David Quinto-Pozos

David Quinto-Pozos
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Department of Linguistics

Ph.D. Linguistics

About

47
Publications
32,145
Reads
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654
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2009 - present
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
August 1996 - December 1998
University of Texas at Austin
Field of study
  • Linguistics
August 1987 - May 1992
University of New Mexico
Field of study
  • Signed Language Interpretation/Religious Studies

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Users of signed and spoken languages regularly engage bodily enactment (commonly referred to as constructed action [CA] for signers and character viewpoint gestures [CVPT] for speakers) for the creation of meaning, but comparatively few studies have addressed how linguistic grammar interfaces with such gestural depictive devices across language mod...
Article
Studies have shown that iconicity can provide a benefit to non-signers during the learning of single signs, but other aspects of signed messages that might also be beneficial have received less attention. In particular, do other features of signed languages help support comprehension of a message during the process of language learning? The followi...
Article
Full-text available
Human languages contain a variety of tools for referencing agents, locations, arguments of predicates, and other entities that are introduced, described, and attributed actions within sentences. While there are similarities across modalities, there also exist notable differences. For example, signed languages are articulated with two hands, and som...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence for a Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) could surface with language processing/comprehension, language production, or a combination of both. Whereas, various studies have described cases of DLD in signing deaf children, there exist few detailed examples of deaf children who exhibit production issues in the absence of processing or comp...
Poster
Full-text available
This research is both a methodological exploration applying the comparative method in historical linguistics to putatively-related signed languages; and a theoretical inquiry into whether there is a parallel to regular sound change in signed language change.
Chapter
Instructors of foreign languages in secondary and higher education often encounter diversity in learning abilities among their learners. Setting aside motivation and other academic factors, what makes one learner better at L1 or L2/Ln learning over another? Might some learners have a stronger aptitude for a signed language over a spoken language? A...
Article
This study investigates the ways in which trilingual (American Sign Language, English, and Spanish) interpreters pronounce names that commonly appear with either English or Spanish phonology. Twenty trilingual interpreters interpreted an ASL mock videophone call into English of a Deaf caller attempting to leave a message for the Social Security Adm...
Article
Full-text available
This commentary on Mayberry and Kluender (2017) considers the geometry of the function relating Age of Acquisition (AoA) to L2 attainment, the effects of multilingual exposure on one's native language(s) and, briefly, the role of education in language learning.
Article
This article describes the case of a deaf native signer of American Sign Language (ASL) with a specific language impairment (SLI). School records documented normal cognitive development but atypical language development. Data include school records; interviews with the child, his mother, and school professionals; ASL and English evaluations; and a...
Article
Multimodal narrative can help us understand how conceptualizers schematize information when they create mental representations of films and may shed light on why some cinematic conventions are easier or harder for viewers to integrate. This study compares descriptions of a shot/reverse shot sequence (a sequence of camera shots from the viewpoints o...
Article
Full-text available
A study was conducted to examine production variability in American Sign Language (ASL) in order to gain insight into the development of motor control in a language produced in another modality. Production variability was characterized through the spatiotemporal index (STI), which represents production stability in whole utterances and is a functio...
Chapter
This chapter provides a clinical neuropsychological assessment approach for assisting with the identification of language disorders in signers. The areas covered include documenting the signers' history and background and testing their general cognitive ability, receptive and expressive language skills. It also include facial processing abilities,...
Chapter
Full-text available
A signed language that is acquired naturally by a deaf or hearing child, for instance within a family or a Deaf school setting, can typically be described as a first language (L1) for the child; such a language could be labeled as signed language L1, or SL1. The acquisition of a signed language can also consist in learning that takes place after a...
Chapter
This volume collects for the first time various accounts of contact between sign languages throughout the world, presenting an exciting opportunity to further understand the structural and social factors of this linguistic component in Deaf communities. Editor David Quinto-Pozos has divided Sign Languages in Contact into four parts, starting with C...
Book
Inquiry into signed languages has added to what is known about structural variation and language, language learning, and cognitive processing of language. However, comparatively little research has focused on communication disorders in signed language users. For some deaf children, atypicality is viewed as a phase that they will outgrow, and this r...
Article
In signed languages, the articulatory space in front of the signer is used grammatically, topographically, and to depict a real or imagined space around a signer and thus is an important consideration in signed language acquisition. It has been suggested that children who acquire signed languages rely on concomitant visual-spatial development to su...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we compare so-called ‘‘classifier’’ constructions in signed languages (which we refer to as ‘‘depicting constructions’’) with comparable iconic gestures produced by non-signers. We show clear correspondences between entity constructions and observer viewpoint gestures on the one hand, and handling constructions and character viewpoin...
Article
Full-text available
This study focused on whether developmental communication disorders exist in American Sign Language (ASL) and how they might be characterized. ASL studies is an emerging field; educators and clinicians have minimal access to descriptions of communication disorders of the signed modality. Additionally, there are limited resources for assessing ASL a...
Article
American Sign Language (ASL) has become a very popular language in high schools, colleges, and universities throughout the U.S., due, in part, to the growing number of schools that allow students to take the language in order to fulfill a foreign or general language requirement. Within the past couple decades, the number of students enrolled in ASL...
Article
This study takes advantage of a novel methodology—the use of a single culturally-meaningful text written in English and presented to different audiences in ASL—to examine the ways in which Deaf native signers utilize contextualization strategies in order to match the perceived linguistic and informational needs of an audience. We demonstrate, t...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: This study focused on whether developmental communication disorders exist in American Sign Language (ASL) and how they might be characterized. ASL studies is an emerging field; educators and clinicians have minimal access to descriptions of communication disorders of the signed modality. Additionally, there are limited resources for assess...
Article
Communication commonly occurs with both linguistic and gestural signals. In spoken languages the gestural signal can be manual (e.g., meaningful hand gestures) or vocal (e.g., meaningful uses of pauses, volume, and intonation), but in signed languages non-linguistic gesture and language occupy the same visual–gestural channel. One type of gesture,...
Chapter
Introduction Language transmission is a natural and hence nearly invisible phenomenon for many of the world's language communities. Typically, and without noticeable difficulty, infants acquire the spoken languages of their families and caregivers. Transmission attracts notice when family languages are not national languages, when children must lea...
Chapter
In the United States, the demand for a new type of interpreting-one that involves the use of three (or more) languages-is increasing rapidly. Sometimes, English is not used in these interpreted events at all-apart from its phonological, lexical, and grammatical influence on Spanish, ASL, or another signed language. The interpreting is often referre...
Article
This chapter highlights some areas that are particularly important to address at the present time-both in language instruction and research on the adult acquisition of American Sign Language (ASL). It focuses on polycomponential signs (PSs), referential shift (RS), and constructed action (CA). It argues that the time has come for the creation of re...
Article
Full-text available
This work concerns structural outcomes of contact between Mexican Sign Language (LSM) and American Sign Language (ASL). A brief description of the social environment that leads to contact between LSM and ASL along the U.S.–Mexico border is provided, and two claims are advanced: (i) Contact between sign languages can exhibit characteristics of conta...
Article
A communicative device that a signer can take advantage of in the visual–gestural modality is the use of the signer's body to depict the actions and movements of an object—whether that object be animate or inanimate. This communicative device (referred to within this abstract as becoming the object) is used frequently in signed narratives, but it a...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores constructed action (a signer's use of various parts of their body—such as the head, torso, and eyegaze—to depict the actions of a character) and why it appears to be an obligatory accompaniment to some so-called "classifier" (or polycomponential) signs. It is posited that constructed action is used to depict aspects of animate...
Article
To my knowledge, this volume represents the first book-length collection of various accounts of contact between sign languages, and this brings with it excitement as well as the realization of challenges that lie ahead.1 As many researchers who are interested in language contact might suggest, it is exciting because these chapters contribute to our...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2002. Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Requires PDF file reader.

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