David Perry

David Perry
University of California, San Francisco | UCSF · Department of Neurological Surgery

PhD

About

23
Publications
3,787
Reads
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1,957
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 1987 - February 1996
McGill University
Position
  • McDonnel-Pew Cognitive Neuroscience Fellow
Description
  • PET studies of auditory-tonal working memory, singing, absolute pitch, covert singing, hemisphere anesthetization

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Human language is organized along two main processing streams connecting posterior temporal cortex and inferior frontal cortex in the left hemisphere, travelling dorsal and ventral to the Sylvian fissure. Some views propose a dorsal motor versus ventral semantic division. Others propose division by combinatorial mechanism, with the dorsal stream re...
Article
OBJECTIVE The dominant inferior parietal lobule (IPL) contains cortical and subcortical regions essential for language. Although resection of IPL tumors could result in language deficits, little is known about the likelihood of postoperative language morbidity or the risk factors predisposing to this outcome. METHODS The authors retrospectively ex...
Article
Objective To avoid iatrogenic injury during the removal of intrinsic cerebral neoplasms such as gliomas, direct electrical stimulation (DES) is used to identify cortical and subcortical white matter pathways critical for language, motor, and sensory function. When a patient undergoes more than 1 brain tumor resection as in the case of tumor recurre...
Article
Object: Transient aphasias are often observed in the first few days after a patient has undergone resection in the language-dominant hemisphere. The aims of this prospective study were to characterize the incidence and nature of these aphasias and to determine whether there are relationships between location of the surgical site and deficits in sp...
Article
Full-text available
OBJECT Awake craniotomy is currently a useful surgical approach to help identify and preserve functional areas during cortical and subcortical tumor resections. Methodologies have evolved over time to maximize patient safety and minimize morbidity using this technique. The goal of this study is to analyze a single surgeon's experience and the evolv...
Article
We compare noninvasive preoperative mapping with magnetic source imaging to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping. These techniques were directly compared in 17 patients who underwent preoperative and postoperative somatosensory mapping of a total of 22 comparable anatomic sites (digits, face). Our findings are presented in the context of pre...
Article
Language dominance in the right hemisphere is rare. Therefore, the organization of essential language sites in the dominant right hemisphere is unclear, especially compared with cases involving the more prevalent left dominant hemisphere. The authors reviewed the medical records of 15 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for tumor or epilepsy su...
Article
To investigate mechanisms of audio-vocal interactions in the human brain, we studied the effect of speech output on modulation of neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. The modulation was assessed indirectly by measuring changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during unvoiced speech (whispering). Using positron emission tomography (PET), CBF was me...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this study was to determine whether the late neuromagnetic field elicited by simple speech sounds, which is detected by magnetoencephalography, may be used to estimate hemispheric dominance for language and to guide or constrain the intraoperative search for essential language sites. If sufficiently robust, a noninvasive method for asse...
Article
Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with PET during rudimentary singing of a single pitch and vowel, contrasted to passive listening to complex tones. CBF increases in cortical areas related to motor control were seen in the supplementary motor area, anterior cingulate cortex, precentral gyri, anterior insula (and the adjacent inner face of the...
Article
Discusses the neurology and neuropsychology of music perception and performance. Topics include: amusias (amusia with aphasia, aphasia without amusia, amusia without aphasia); auditory agnosias and verbal deafness; progress in the classification of auditory disorders (auditory agnosias, amusias); cerebral hemisphere asymmetry in music perception...
Article
Full-text available
We used both structural and functional brain imaging techniques to investigate the neural basis of absolute pitch (AP), a specialized skill present in some musicians. By using positron emission tomography, we measured cerebral blood flow during the presentation of musical tones to AP possessors and to control musicians without AP. Listening to musi...
Article
Full-text available
To investigate mechanisms of audio-vocal interactions in the human brain, we studied the effect of speech output on modulation of neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. The modulation was assessed indirectly by measuring changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during unvoiced speech (whispering). Using positron emission tomography (PET), CBF was me...
Article
Full-text available
Neuropsychological studies have suggested that imagery processes may be mediated by neuronal mechanisms similar to those used in perception. To test this hypothesis, and to explore the neural basis for song imagery, 12 normal subjects were scanned using the water bolus method to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) during the performance of three task...
Article
Although much is known about the auditory nervous system, in both man and nonhuman primates, and about the neural substrates for vocal production, particularly in nonhuman primates, relatively little is known about how these two systems are integrated in vocal behavior. The present study used positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance ima...
Article
Studies in which recognition performance is compared for melodies presented to each ear, although most frequently indicating a left ear asymmetry (LEA), have generated a complex set of results in which EA appears to be fundamentally determined by the mode of processing engaged. In a melody recall experiment, experienced pianists were presented with...
Article
Recall of monaurally presented diatonic melodies by experienced pianists was recorded with a computer‐interfaced keyboard. Responses were analyzed by computer in terms of pitch accuracy and in terms of the timing of keystrokes (response latency, keyboard rehearsal time, final recall speed, and temporal segregation). For right‐handed pianists (N = 1...
Article
Subjects from a broad range of musical experience were presented with inversions of the major triad, and asked to sing the most salient pitch, and the pitch that would best follow the chord. Responses were recorded by computer via voltage‐to‐music instrument digital interface conversion. Responses for salience did not differ significantly with musi...

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