David Peacock

David Peacock
University of Adelaide · School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences

PhD

About

112
Publications
29,765
Reads
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1,132
Citations
Citations since 2017
34 Research Items
854 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Additional affiliations
April 2005 - July 2019
Biosecurity South Australia
Position
  • Research Officer

Publications

Publications (112)
Article
Introduced predators are a significant threat to global biodiversity and are responsible for most of all modern bird, reptile, and mammal extinctions. In Australia, the introduced feral cat (Felis catus) kills 459 million mammals annually and leaves many species facing extinction. Attempted reintroductions of threatened mammal species often fail du...
Article
To genetically assess the Australian distribution and frequency of Eimeria species in wild rabbits, with a primary focus on Eimeria intestinalis and Eimeria flavescens as possible additional agents of rabbit biocontrol, the distal colon and faecal samples from wild rabbits sourced from 26 Australian locations with mean annual rainfalls of between 2...
Article
Australian quolls are known to scavenge, but little direct data support their propensity to scavenge a corpse. A review of 861 newspapers on the Australian newspaper digitisation website Trove found one hundred and eleven accounts from between 1831 and 1916 where the scavenging of a corpse was attributed partly or entirely to scavenging by quolls....
Article
Full-text available
Landholder support and participation is essential to the success of feral cat management, and landholders in various locations with particular land use types are affected differently by the presence of feral cats and by the management approach applied to control them. We used a landholder questionnaire to assess attitudes towards feral cats and lev...
Article
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Movements that extend beyond the usual space use of an animal have been documented in a range of species and are particularly prevalent in arid areas. We present long-distance movement data on five feral cats (Felis catus) GPS/VHF-collared during two different research projects in arid and semi-arid Australia. We compare these movements with data f...
Article
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Parasite infection pressure is suggested to be a strong driver of transmission within ecosystems. We tested if infection pressure drives seroprevalence in intermediate host species for Toxoplasma gondii. We defined Toxoplasma infection pressure to intermediate host species as the combined influence of cat abundance, environmental conditions, and it...
Article
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Successful fauna reintroductions occur when the original causes of decline are addressed. When these causes are unclear, intensive post-release monitoring could help identify unknown threats and new management actions. We present an Australian case study involving a reintroduction of the threatened western quoll (Dasyurus geoffroii), a species whos...
Article
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Invasive animals, such as feral cats, are considered non-threatening by some social groups due to their similarity to companion animals, and this can pose a threat to the success of invasive species management through lack of support. Feral cat management is undertaken across southern Australia, and it is therefore important to determine the social...
Article
ContextThe introduced house mouse (Mus domesticus) causes significant economic damage to Australia’s agricultural enterprises. As part of the Marna Banggara Rewilding Project on the southern Yorke Peninsula (SYP), the present study focused on the eastern barn owl (Tyto alba delicatula) as a potential bio-controller of mice, by providing nesting spa...
Article
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Since its introduction to control overabundant invasive European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus ), the highly virulent Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) has caused regular annual disease outbreaks in Australian rabbit populations. Although initially reducing rabbit abundance by 60%, continent‐wide, experimental evidence has since indicated i...
Article
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Camera traps are now the most commonly used technique for indexing feral cat (Felis catus) and predator populations. Camera flash-type has been suggested to influence an animal’s behaviour and their redetection by similar cameras, with white-flash cameras being shown to reduce the probability of redetecting some species. We investigated the influen...
Article
Objective The aim of this study was to utilise wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a sentinel species to study levels of environmental contamination with N. caninum and T. gondii in South Australia, and to examine associations with rainfall, climate and land use. Design Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), an apicomplexan parasite, causes the clinic...
Article
Understanding environmental factors influencing the abundance of species is important for developing strategies to manage wildlife effectively. Long‐term studies provide the most reliable information upon which to base management decisions. This is particularly important when considering threatening processes, like drought and climate change, and a...
Article
This review examines the social aspects that influence feral cat management. In particular, it examines definitions and perceptions of feral cats as a species in different countries and across cultures. Using case studies from around the world, we investigate the factors that can influence public perceptions and social acceptance of feral cats and...
Article
Spotted-tailed quolls ( Dasyurus maculatus) – cat-sized, carnivorous marsupials – occupied Kangaroo Island (KI), South Australia, for over 50,000 years but became locally extinct following European settlement of the island in 1836. As the largest mammalian predator on KI when the Europeans colonised it, spotted-tailed quolls would have played a sig...
Article
Full-text available
Infection with the cat-borne parasite Toxoplasma gondii has been detected in numerous Australian marsupials and can lead to severe disease (toxoplasmosis) in some cases. The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma on Kangaroo Island, South Australia has been reported to be higher than the South Australian mainland in macropods, cats, and sheep, suggesting an...
Article
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Context. Feral cats threaten wildlife conservation through a range of direct and indirect effects. However, most studies that have evaluated the impacts of feral cats on species of conservation significance have focussed on direct impacts such as predation; few studies have considered the indirect impacts of cat-borne disease. Toxoplasma gondii, a...
Article
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Context. Feral cats (Felis catus) impact the health and welfare of wildlife, livestock and humans worldwide. They are particularly damaging where they have been introduced into island countries such as Australia and New Zealand, where native prey species evolved without feline predators. Kangaroo Island, in South Australia, is Australia's third lar...
Article
Full-text available
Infection with the cat-borne parasite Toxoplasma gondii has been detected in numerous Australian marsupials and can lead to severe disease (toxoplasmosis) in some cases. The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma on Kangaroo Island, South Australia has been reported to be higher than the South Australian mainland in macropods, cats, and sheep, suggesting an...
Article
With ongoing introductions into Australia since the 1700s, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has become one of the most widely distributed and abundant vertebrate pests, adversely impacting Australia's biodiversity and agro‐economy. To better understand the population and range dynamics of the species and its impacts, occurrence and abund...
Article
The coevolution of myxoma virus (MYXV) and European rabbits in Australia is one of the most important natural experiments in evolutionary biology, providing insights into virus adaptation to new hosts and the evolution of virulence. Previous studies of MYXV evolution have also shown that the virus evolves both relatively rapidly and in a strongly c...
Article
Full-text available
The introduced European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is one of Australia’s most damaging invasive alien species, both in terms of ecological and economic impact. Biological control of rabbits using the myxoma and rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses has been undertaken in Australia since the mid-1950s, and locally varying genetic resistance to the...
Article
A new record of an albino marsupial, the northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus), is described and placed in the context of 10 records since 1874 from all four Australian quoll species. Of the 10 previous records, one was D. hallucatus, seven are likely to be D. viverrinus, one D. maculatus and one unknown. The recent record comprises the live capture...
Preprint
Full-text available
Myxoma virus (MYXV) has been evolving in a novel host species – European rabbits – in Australia since 1950. Previous studies of viruses sampled from 1950 to 1999 revealed a remarkably clock-like evolutionary process across all Australian lineages of MYXV. Through an analysis of 49 newly generated MYXV genome sequences isolated in Australia between...
Article
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Predators are critical components of ecosystems, but large marsupial carnivores have suffered major declines and extinctions in Australia. To inform predator restoration efforts on Kangaroo Island (South Australia) we examined the survival histories and potential extirpation factors of large marsupial carnivores that previously occurred on Kangaroo...
Article
1. Exploiting synergies among diseases or parasites could increase the efficacy of biological control of invasive species. In Australia, two viruses were introduced to control European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus: myxoma virus in 1950 and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in 1995. While these biological controls caused initial declines of > 95% i...
Article
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Digital media and digital search tools offer simple and effective means to monitor for pathogens and disease outbreaks in target organisms. Using tools such as Rich Site Summary feeds, and Google News and Google Scholar specific key word searches, international digital media were actively monitored from 2012 to 2016 for pathogens and disease outbre...
Article
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Lagovirus europaeus GI.2, also commonly known as rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2, was first detected at two long-term monitoring sites for European rabbits,Oryctolagus cuniculus, in South Australia, in mid-2016. Numbers of rabbits in the following 12-18 months were reduced to approximately 20 per cent of average numbers in the preceding 10 year...
Article
Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2; Lagovirus GI.2) is a pathogenic calicivirus that affects European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and various hare (Lepus) species. GI.2 was first detected in France in 2010 and subsequently caused epidemics in wild and domestic lagomorph populations throughout Europe. In May 2015, GI.2 was detected in Aus...
Article
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Lagoviruses belong to the Caliciviridae family. They were first recognized as highly pathogenic viruses of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) that emerged in the 1970-1980s, namely, rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV), according to the host specie...
Article
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The Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) was imported into Australia in 1995 as a biocontrol agent to manage one of the most successful and devastating invasive species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). During the first disease outbreaks, RHDV caused mortality rates of up to 97% and reduced Australian rabbit numbers to very low leve...
Article
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After domestication, wild progenitors, such as the aurochs and the wild horse, became extinct. For the European rabbit, however, ancestral, domestic, and feral populations exist. During domestication of the rabbit, very few alleles have been fixed for selective traits, and thus, the ancestral genotypes have been preserved in lowered frequencies. Th...
Article
The emergence of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) in Europe (Le Gall-Reculé and others 2011) has been associated with declines in wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) populations (Delibes-Mateos and others 2014; Guerrero-Casado and others 2016; Monterroso and others 2016) previously exposed to RHDV. All RHDV genotypes of the G1-G6 genogro...
Article
RABBIT haemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) belongs to the family Caliciviridae, genus Lagovirus , along with RHDV , European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV) and other unassigned rabbit caliciviruses (RCVs). RHDV2 was first detected in European rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ) in France in 2010 (Le Gall-Recule and others 2011). It spread rapidly...
Article
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The effectiveness of invasive species control can be influenced by seasonal fluctuations in reproduction in response to environmental conditions. However, it is difficult to determine how demography and environmental conditions affect the efficacy of different control efforts from field trials alone. We incorporated an ontogenetic growth model into...
Article
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Predation, along with competition and disease transmission from feral domestic cats (Felis catus), poses the key threat to many in situ and reintroduced populations of threatened species globally. Feral cats are more challenging to control than pest canids because cats seldom consume poison baits or enter baited traps when live prey are readily ava...
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We conducted a search of the historical records for any mention of hairy-nosed wombats in order to establish their likely distribution at the time of European settlement. The evidence suggests that there were two main groups of southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) that were separated by Spencer Gulf in South Australia. The western g...
Article
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Introduced predators have been implicated in the decline of many fauna populations around the world and are the main factor responsible for the failure of numerous fauna reintroduction programs. As a result, control of introduced predators is a significant management action implemented in wildlife protection programs, particularly in Australia, New...
Article
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Context: Recovery of Australian rabbit populations from the impact of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) contrasts with more prolonged suppression of wild rabbits in Europe, and has been widely discussed in the scientific community but not yet documented in formal scientific literature. The underlying causes of recovery remain unclear but res...
Article
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Infectious diseases can exert a strong influence on the dynamics of host populations, but it remains unclear why such disease-mediated control only occurs under particular environmental conditions.We used 16 years of detailed field data on invasive European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Australia, linked to individual-based stochastic models a...
Article
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Since the European settlement of Australia in 1788, 25 mainland terrestrial mammal species have become extinct, more than on any other continent during this period. To determine if the causal factors are still active, it is necessary to better understand the species and their status preceding these regional extirpations or extinctions, and examine...
Article
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The invasion of northern Australia by the poisonous cane toad is well recognised, as is its devastating impacts on numerous local native species. However, there is little recognition that the toads are spreading into south-western Queensland. Utilising local knowledge, a limited survey was undertaken within the Cooper Creek catchment to locate the...
Article
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In Australia, the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been used since 1996 to reduce numbers of introduced European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) which have a devastating impact on the native Australian environment. RHDV causes regular, short disease outbreaks, but little is known about how the virus persists and survives between epidemi...
Article
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The frequency and timing of rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) epizootics and their impact on different age groups of rabbits were studied for 15 years in a recovering rabbit population in South Australia. We recorded the number and body size of rabbits dying during RHD epizootics, collected tissue for genetic analysis of rabbit haemorrhagic disease...
Article
Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) was introduced into Australia in 1995 as a biological control agent against the wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). We evaluated its evolution over a 16 year period (1995-2011) by examining 50 isolates collected throughout Australia, as well as the original inoculum strains. Phylogenetic analysis o...
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