David J. Pannell

David J. Pannell
University of Western Australia | UWA · UWA School of Agriculture and Environment

BSc, BEc, PhD

About

330
Publications
75,475
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
11,216
Citations
Introduction
Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Western Australia, Director of the Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy, an ARC Federation Fellow (2007-2012) and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. David’s research has won awards in the USA, Australia, Canada and the UK.
Additional affiliations
December 1991 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Head of School
December 1991 - September 2017
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Managing Director

Publications

Publications (330)
Article
Climate change is forcing cities to reassess their water management practices, particularly for water-intensive applications like park irrigation. If water scarcity requires governments to deviate from current park management norms and allocate less water towards parks, it is essential that park managers design spaces that maintain community wellbe...
Article
Full-text available
Transdisciplinary research (TDR) can help generate solutions to environmental challenges and enhance the uptake of research outputs, thus contributing to advance sustainability in social-ecological systems. Our aim is to support investment decisions in TDR; more specifically, to help funders, researchers, and research users to decide when and why i...
Article
Traditional centralized water-management systems have tended to fall short in delivering environmental and amenity benefits in urban areas. Water-sensitive urban design (WSUD) projects have been proposed as an alternative due to their ability to generate multiple benefits, including improving water quality, water supply, aesthetics, urban cooling,...
Article
Full-text available
Participatory scenario planning (PSP) has mainly concerned scenario development and outreach, with less emphasis on scenario assessment. However, eliciting stakeholder responses to scenarios, focusing on subjective wellbeing, can increase the legitimacy, relevance, and applicability of PSP. We developed a PSP exercise with a multi-stakeholder, cros...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Given proposed expansion of developments in northern Australia and current tensions among stakeholders, there is a need to develop new planning approaches that support multiple uses of land and water, while maintaining environmental and cultural values. This project aimed to demonstrate how to operationalise multi-objective catchment planning suppo...
Article
Sugarcane farmers have several options to manage their energy costs of irrigation. One option these farmers are yet to widely adopt is solar photovoltaic (PV) systems for energy generation. The objective of the study was to understand the potential rate and peak level of adoption by Australian sugarcane irrigators of solar PV energy systems for wat...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Given the proposed expansion of developments in northern Australia and current tensions among different interest groups, there is a need to develop new planning approaches that support multiple uses of land and water, while maintaining environmental and cultural values. Our project aimed to demonstrate how to operationalise multi-objective catchmen...
Article
CONTEXT Scholars have argued that empirical studies of adoption in agriculture should consider adoption as a dynamic process rather than a binary choice, but many empirical studies continue to be based on cross-sectional surveys in which adoption is treated binarily. In general, surveys put more emphasis on investigating adoption drivers (i.e. inde...
Article
Soil acidification due to crop removal and the use of acidifying fertilisers reduce land productivity in many agricultural systems worldwide. The most common remedy is to apply lime to the soil surface. An alternative approach is to incorporate lime into the sub‐soil. This is a more expensive option, but it substantially reduces the time required t...
Article
Full-text available
Models can provide a structured way to think about adoption and provide a method to investigate the impacts of different factors in the adoption process. With at least 70 years of research in the adoption of agricultural innovations, there has been a proliferation of adoption models, both conceptual and numerical. This diversity has resulted in a l...
Article
Full-text available
Context Since COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) was first identified in the human population, it has had immediate and significant effects on peoples' health and the worldwide economy. In the absence of a vaccine, control of the virus involved limiting its spread through restrictions in the movement of people, goods and services. This has led to unprecedented...
Preprint
Full-text available
Policymakers make decisions about COVID-19 management in the face of considerable uncertainty. We convened multiple modeling teams to evaluate reopening strategies for a mid-sized county in the United States, in a novel process designed to fully express scientific uncertainty while reducing linguistic uncertainty and cognitive biases. For the scena...
Article
The responses of policy makers, individuals and businesses to COVID‐19 contrast with typical responses to environmental issues. In most countries, governments have been willing to act decisively to implement costly restrictions on work and personal life, to a degree that has never been observed for an environmental issue. A number of possible lesso...
Article
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has triggered efforts by multiple modeling groups to forecast disease trajectory, assess interventions, and improve understanding of the pathogen. Such models can often differ substantially in their projections and recommendations, reflecting different policy assumptions and objectives, as well as sc...
Article
Western Australia's Swan River is a complex asset providing environmental, recreational and commercial benefits. Agencies responsible for its management rely extensively on advice from experts, whose preferences may or may not align with those of the community. Using a choice experiment, we compared public and expert preferences for managing the ri...
Article
Research on the adoption of new practices and new behaviors in agriculture continues to grow and evolve, and its relevance to policy remains high. This special issue presents 10 papers that provide overviews of important aspects of the recent adoption literature, or identify gaps and opportunities in the literature. Adoption research has been innov...
Article
This paper provides a selective overview of the linkages and complementary topics in behavioral economics and agricultural adoption literatures. The goal of the paper is to identify likely directions for future research at the intersection of behavioral economics and agricultural adoption. This research agenda has potential for providing valuable i...
Article
Much of agricultural and agri‐environmental policy is concerned with influencing the behavior of farmers in adopting new practices. An ability to understand and predict adoption of practices is useful for agricultural policy in several ways, including assessing additionality, selecting policy mechanisms, targeting policy to practices, farmer types...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Restoring degraded landscapes for conservation purposes can involve transaction costs to acquire the land in the first place. Zunyi and colleagues propose a framework for prioritizing uncontested lands that can provide ecosystem services without those costs.
Article
Many agricultural soils are naturally acidic, and agricultural production can acidify soil through processes such as nitrogen (N) fixation by legumes and application of N fertiliser. This means that decisions about mitigation of soil acidity (e.g. through application of lime), crop rotation and N fertiliser application are interdependent. This pape...
Article
Full-text available
Competition for land resources is intense, with growing demand for food and resources to support humanity. Despite this, global agricultural area has significantly declined over the past two decades due to socio–political trends, market changes and environmental degradation. Although expensive, restoring degraded lands that are no longer contested...
Article
Full-text available
Soil acidity is a major limiting factor for crop production in many farming systems worldwide. Lime application is the most common practice to mitigate soil acidity. There are complex economic interactions between application of lime and nitrogen fertilizer, with the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the use of these inputs adding further co...
Article
Full-text available
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular, but debated, management strategy to conserve marine biodiversity and ensure sustainable human use of the oceans. Economic studies can contribute to the debate about MPAs as a management option by evaluating their benefits and costs to society. In this paper, we outline how to evaluate the e...
Article
Full-text available
In various countries, offset policies allow economic developments to proceed on condition that proponents undertake agreed actions that offset the resulting losses of environmental values. Although ecological and environmental benefits are the main concern of a conservation agency when assessing an offset proposal, it is also important to be aware...
Article
Agricultural research on climate change generally follows two themes: (i) impact and adaptation or (ii) mitigation and emissions. Despite both being simultaneously relevant to future agricultural systems, the two are usually studied separately. By contrast, this study jointly compares the potential impacts of climate change and the effects of mitig...
Article
Full-text available
Prioritising investments to minimise or mitigate natural hazards such as wildfires and storms is of increasing importance to hazard managers. Prioritisation of this type can be strengthened by considering benefit and cost impacts. To evaluate benefits and costs, managers require an understanding of both the tangible economic benefits and costs of m...
Article
In Australian sugarcane production, 90% of irrigation pumps are connected to the national electricity grid. In regional Queensland, where irrigated sugarcane is grown, both the retailer and distribution network service providers are government owned and highly regulated. This study investigates options for on-farm embedded generation from a range o...
Article
Clustered robust meta-regression analysis is applied to 109 willingness to pay (WTP) estimates for threatened species from 47 stated-preference studies in 19 countries. Our study updates previous meta-analyses on the topic and tests the effect of important variables not previously considered-species' threat status, use of coloured photographs of sp...
Article
Globally, the area of agricultural land is shrinking in part due to environmental degradation. Acquisition and restoration of degraded lands no longer used for agriculture may present a major conservation opportunity with minimal social and political opposition. The ability to efficiently and accurately identify these lands from regional to global...
Article
Full-text available
Determining how best to manage an infectious disease outbreak may be hindered by both epidemiological uncertainty (i.e. about epidemiological processes) and operational uncertainty (i.e. about the effectiveness of candidate interventions). However, these two uncertainties are rarely addressed concurrently in epidemic studies. We present an approach...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Maintaining mammal populations on havens – whether they are naturally occurring or translocated – has helped to prevent further mammal extinctions, and consolidated protection for other species. These havens fall under the management of many organisations, ranging from local councils, community groups and small private organisations to large non-go...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Many Australian mammal species are highly susceptible to predation by introduced cats and foxes. At least 34 Australian endemic mammal species have been made extinct since 1788, about 10% of Australia's terrestrial fauna, and predation by cats and foxes was a major contribution to most of those extinctions. Maintaining mammal populations on havens...
Poster
Full-text available
Poor river health creates ecological problems, poses a public health risk and becomes a nuisance to the residents. Making decisions about management actions to restore ecosystem health, for example through reduction of nutrients runoff, requires information about the value of the healthy ecosystem, and in particular the value of water quality. Impo...
Article
Prescribed burning is used in Australia as a tool to manage fire risk and protect assets. A key challenge is deciding how to arrange the burns to generate the highest benefits to society. Studies have shown that prescribed burning in the wildland–urban interface (WUI) can reduce the risk of house loss due to wildfires, but the costs and benefits of...
Article
There is growing recognition that coastal water quality is interdependent with agricultural management in coastal catchments. Economic-incentive-based instruments can be used to internalize the negative externalities from coastal water pollution. Bio-physical and socio-economic heterogeneity across farms is expected to be an important factor in exp...
Article
Agriculture stands on the cusp of a digital revolution, and the same technologies that created the Internet and are transforming medicine are now being applied in our farms and on our fields. Overall, this digital agricultural revolution is being driven by the low cost of collecting data on everything from soil conditions to animal health and crop...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Soil acidification due to crop removal and the use of acidifying fertilizers reduces land productivity across agricultural systems worldwide. The standard remedy is to periodically apply lime to the soil surface which, over a number of years, is assimilated into the soil profile and raises soil pH. However, an alternative approach is to incorporate...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental and conservation scientists are increasingly being asked to justify their work in terms of benefits to society. This article describes economic theory for conceptualizing the benefits from environmental research, and provides a framework for estimating those benefits. In particular we discuss the evaluation of environmental science th...
Article
Full-text available
Shark-diving tourism provides important economic benefits to the Maldives. We examine the link between shark conservation actions and economic returns from diving tourism. A combined travel cost and contingent behaviour approach is used to estimate the dive trip demand under different management scenarios. Our results show that increasing shark pop...
Poster
Full-text available
The primary causes of biodiversity decline worldwide are habitat destruction, alteration and fragmentation resulting from human economic activities such as agriculture or property development. Public- and private-sector organizations allocate considerable resources to slow down biodiversity decline by developing conservation networks that preserve...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Many Australian mammal species are highly susceptible to predation by introduced domestic cats (Felis catus) and European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). These predators have caused many extinctions and have driven large distributional and population declines for many more species. The serendipitous occurrence of, and deliberate translocations...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate assessment of the cost of carbon sequestration is important for the development of mitigation policies globally. Given that sequestration in soils or vegetation is a lengthy process, such assessment requires financial discounting and making realistic assumptions about changes over time in the rate of sequestration, the price of carbon, and...
Article
Full-text available
There is much existing knowledge about the factors that influence adoption of new practices in agriculture but few attempts have been made to construct predictive quantitative models of adoption for use by those planning agricultural research, development, extension and policy. ADOPT (Adoption and Diffusion Outcome Prediction Tool) is the result of...
Article
Full-text available
Shark-diving is part of a rapidly growing industry focused on marine wildlife tourism. Our study aimed to provide an estimate of the economic value of shark-diving tourism across Australia by comprehensively surveying the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), grey nurse shark (Carcharias taurus), and reef shark (mostl...
Article
Full-text available
Over-fishing is a global problem that damages the marine environment and compromises the long-term sustainability of fisheries. This damage can be mitigated by restricting catch or other activities which can occur in marine areas. However, such management is only effective when restrictions are enforced to ensure compliance. We expect fishers to he...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The primary causes of biodiversity decline worldwide are habitat destruction, alteration and fragmentation resulting from human economic activities such as agriculture or property development. Public-and private-sector organizations allocate considerable resources to slow down biodiversity decline by developing conservation networks that preserve r...
Article
There are many examples of decision support tools used to analyse information with the intention of assisting conservation managers and policy makers in their decision making. We used structured interviews to collect information on seven case studies from Australia and New Zealand to identify the factors that led to the use (or non-use) of decision...
Technical Report
Recovery plans are considered an important policy instrument for threatened species recovery efforts.This report presents the results of the first institutional gap analysis for threatened species conservation, employing two native Australian species listed as ‘endangered’ under the EPBC Act (1999) as case studies; the bridled nailtail wallaby (Ony...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of climate change on agricultural profitability depend not just on changes in production, but also on how farming systems are adapted to suit the new climatic conditions. We investigated the interaction between production changes, adaptation and farm profits for a mixed livestock–cropping farming system in the Western Australian Wheatbe...
Article
The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is seeking to prepare for losses arising from climate change. This is an emerging issue that challenges climate science and policy to engage more deeply with values, places, and people’s experiences. We first provide insight into the UNFCCC framing of loss and damage and current app...
Article
Full-text available
Many urban streams have been cleared of native vegetation and converted to open drains resulting in a loss of ecological and aesthetic function. There is a growing recognition of the importance of these functions and work is being done to restore urban drains and create fully functioning wetland ecosystems (“living streams”). Such restoration work...
Article
Full-text available
We analyze the dynamic process of invasive-species control in a spatially explicit and stochastic setting. An integer optimization model is applied to identify optimal strategies to deal with invasive species at a steady state. Optimal strategies depend on the spatial location of invasion as well as on stochastic characteristics of spread and contr...
Article
Economic insights are crucial for making sound decisions about farm-level management of nitrogen and also about regional or national policy such as for water pollution. In the present review, key insights are presented from a large and diverse literature on the economics of nitrogen in agriculture and the economics of the consequences of nitrogen f...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Executive Summary There is much interest in ‘developing’ Northern Australia with a parallel commitment to “caring for the unique Australian landscape” (Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet 2014). However, trying to decide how to ‘develop’ and ‘protect’ simultaneously is a non-trivial task. There are many modelling tools: integrated models, fram...
Article
Full-text available
If carbon sequestration is to be a cost-effective substitute for reducing emissions then it must occur under a framework that ensures that the sequestration is additional to what would otherwise have occurred, the carbon is stored permanently, and any leakage is properly accounted for. We discuss significant challenges in meeting these requirements...
Article
Australian and New Zealand research on the economics of natural resource management (NRM) has a relatively short history. Defining NRM as including water, fisheries, agricultural land, nature conservation and forestry, 65 per cent of all Australasian journal articles in the area have been published since 2005. The most researched NRM issue is water...
Article
Full-text available
This study presents results of an analysis of 1060 academic articles published in the Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics and the Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics from 1957 to 2015. A number of trends in research topics over time identified by the study include a decline in research on agricultural topics; growth i...
Chapter
Full-text available
Selecting an effective ecological restoration project requires information about the levels of public and private net benefits that are likely to result from project implementation. Environmental assets on private land in agricultural landscapes may provide benefits that are valued by the landholders. The value of these benefits could be reflected...