David Edwin Naugle

David Edwin Naugle
University of Montana | UMT · Wildlife Biology Program

PhD South Dakota Statre University 1998

About

190
Publications
33,876
Reads
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6,092
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - present
University of Montana
Position
  • Professor (Full)
July 1998 - July 2001
University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (190)
Article
Full-text available
Spatial and temporal dynamics of rangeland fuels is a primary factor driving large wildfires. Yet detailed information capturing variation in fine fuels has largely been missing from rangeland fire planning and fuels management. New fuels-based maps of Great Basin rangeland fire probability help bridge this gap by coupling dynamic vegetation cover...
Article
Full-text available
Wildfires are a growing management concern in western US rangelands, where invasive annual grasses have altered fire regimes and contributed to an increased incidence of catastrophic large wildfires. Fire activity in arid, nonforested ecosystems is thought to be largely controlled by interannual variation in fuel amount, which in turn is controlled...
Preprint
Contemporary restoration and management of sagebrush-dominated (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems across the intermountain west of the United States increasingly involves the removal of expanding conifer, particularly juniper (Juniperus spp.) and pinyon pine (Pinus edulis, P. monophylla). The impetus behind much of this management has been the demonstrate...
Preprint
Tree expansion among historic grassland and shrubland systems is a global phenomenon, which results in dramatic influences on ecosystem processes and wildlife populations. In the western US, pinyon-juniper woodlands have expanded by as much as six-fold among sagebrush steppe landscapes since the late nineteenth century, with demonstrated negative i...
Article
Full-text available
Aim In the western United States, sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) and salt desert shrublands are rapidly transitioning to communities dominated by exotic annual grasses, a novel and self‐reinforcing state that threatens the economic sustainability and conservation value of rangelands. Climate change is predicted to favour annual grasses, potentially pus...
Article
Full-text available
In this era of global environmental change and rapid regime shifts, managing for core areas that species require to survive and persist is a grand challenge for conservation. Because wildlife monitoring data are often limited or local in scale, the emerging ability to map and track spatial regimes (i.e., the spatial manifestation of state transitio...
Article
Full-text available
In the Great Basin, coniferous trees are expanding their range at a rate higher than any other time during the Holocene. Approximately 90% of the expansion has occurred in ecosystems previously dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.). Transitions from open, sagebrush steppe to woodlands are considered a threat to the greater sage‐grouse (Centrocerc...
Article
Full-text available
On the Ground •Rangeland management has entered a new era with the accessibility and advancement of satellite-derived maps. •Maps provide a comprehensive view of rangelands in space and time, and challenge us to think critically about natural variability. •Here, we advance the practice of using satellite-derived maps with four guiding principles d...
Article
Full-text available
Woodland expansion is a global challenge documented under varying degrees of disturbance, climate, and land ownership patterns. In North American rangelands, mechanical and chemical brush management practices and prescribed fire are frequently promoted by agencies and used by private landowners to reduce woody plant cover. We assess the distributio...
Article
Rangeland production is a foundational ecosystem service and resource on which livestock, wildlife, and people depend. Capitalizing on recent advancements in the use of remote sensing data across rangelands, we provide estimates of herbaceous rangeland production from 1986 to 2019 at 16-d and annual time steps and 30-m resolution across the western...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wildfires are a growing management concern in western US rangelands, where invasive annual grasses have altered fire regimes and contributed to an increased incidence of catastrophic large wildfires. Fire activity in arid, non-forested ecosystems is thought to be largely controlled by interannual variation in fuel amount, which in turn is controlle...
Article
Full-text available
Woody plant expansion into shrub and grasslands is a global and vexing ecological problem. In the Great Basin of North America, the expansion of pinyon–juniper (Pinus spp.–Juniperus spp.) woodlands is threatening the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) biome. The Greater Sage‐grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; sage‐grouse), a sagebrush obligate species, is...
Article
Full-text available
Working lands are an attractive solution for conservation in the conterminous United States where 76% of area is privately owned. Conservation of private lands often relies on participation in temporary incentive-based programs. As incentives expire landowners make decisions that determine whether environmental benefits continue. In the U.S., the C...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Coniferous trees, principally juniper (Juniperus spp.) and pinyon pine (Pinus spp.), have increased considerably in cover and density in the western United States since European settlement with wide ranging consequences for sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems. A continuum of vegetation types exists across the region, from conifer-encroached shrub...
Preprint
Full-text available
Rangelands of the United States provide ecosystem services that benefit society and rural economies. Native tree encroachment is often overlooked as a primary threat to rangelands due to the slow pace of tree cover expansion and the positive public perception of trees. Still, tree encroachment fragments these landscapes and reduces herbaceous produ...
Article
Full-text available
Long‐term population declines have elevated recovery of grassland avifauna to among the highest conservation priorities in North America. Because most of the Great Plains is privately owned, recovery of grassland bird populations depends on voluntary approaches to conservation with strong partnerships between private landowners and resource profess...
Article
Full-text available
Operational satellite remote sensing products are transforming rangeland management and science. Advancements in computation, data storage, and processing have removed barriers that previously blocked or hindered the development and use of remote sensing products. When combined with local data and knowledge, remote sensing products can inform decis...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim In the western US, sagebrush ( Artemisia spp.) and salt desert shrublands are rapidly transitioning to communities dominated by exotic annual grasses, a novel and often self-reinforcing state that threatens the economic sustainability and conservation value of rangelands. Climate change is predicted to directly and indirectly favor annual grass...
Preprint
Full-text available
Rangeland production is a foundational ecosystem service and resource upon which livestock, wildlife, and people depend. Capitalizing on recent advancements in the use of remote sensing data across rangelands we provide estimates of herbaceous rangeland production from 1986-2019 at 16-day and annual time steps and 30m resolution across the western...
Article
Full-text available
Woody encroachment is a global driver of grassland loss and management to counteract encroachment represents one of the most expensive conservation practices implemented in grasslands. Yet, outcomes of these practices are often unknown at large scales and this constrains practitioner's ability to advance conservation. Here, we use new monitoring da...
Article
Full-text available
In the absence of technology-driven monitoring platforms, US rangeland policies, management practices, and outcome assessments have been primarily informed by the extrapolation of local information from national-scale rangeland inventories. A persistent monitoring gap between plot-level inventories and the scale at which rangeland assessments are c...
Article
Full-text available
Wildfires are ecosystem-level drivers of structure and function in many vegetated biomes. While numerous studies have emphasized the benefits of fire to ecosystems, large wildfires have also been associated with the loss of ecosystem services and shifts in vegetation abundance. The size and number of wildfires are increasing across a number of regi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Operational satellite remote sensing products are transforming rangeland management and science. Advancements in computation, data storage, and processing have removed barriers that previously blocked or hindered the development and use of remote sensing products. When combined with local data and knowledge, remote sensing products can inform decis...
Presentation
Full-text available
Summary of conifer expansion threat in sagebrush ecosystems as described in chapter for WAFWA's Sagebrush Conservation Strategy. Video replay: https://youtu.be/m1eHscKU6f8
Article
Full-text available
One of the primary conservation threats surrounding sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems in the Intermountain West of the United States is the expansion and infilling of pinyon pine (Pinus edulis, P. monophylla) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands. Woodland expansion into sagebrush ecosystems has demonstrated impacts on sagebrush-associated flo...
Article
Full-text available
Sage‐grouse (Centrocercus spp.) are influencing rapidly evolving land management policy in the western United States. Management objectives for fine‐scale vegetation characteristics (e.g., grass height >18 cm) have been adopted by land management agencies based on resource selection or relationships with fitness proxies reported among numerous habi...
Article
Full-text available
Conservationists are increasingly convinced that coproduction of science enhances its utility in policy, decision-making, and practice. Concomitant is a renewed reliance on privately owned working lands to sustain nature and people. We propose a coupling of these emerging trends as a better recipe for conservation. To illustrate this, we present fi...
Article
Full-text available
Screening is a strategy for detecting undesirable change prior to manifestation of symptoms or adverse effects. Although the well-recognized utility of screening makes it commonplace in medicine, it has yet to be implemented in ecosystem management. Ecosystem management is in an era of diagnosis and treatment of undesirable change, and as a result,...
Article
Full-text available
On the Ground •Maximizing efficiency and effectiveness of limited resources to conserve America's vast western grazing lands requires a science-based approach. •Working Lands for Wildlife, USDA's approach for conserving America's working lands, co-produces scientific tools and quantifies outcomes that help guide future implementation and improve d...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial arthropods are a critical component of rangeland ecosystems that convert primary production into resources for higher trophic levels. During spring and summer, select arthropod taxa are the primary food of breeding prairie birds, of which many are imperiled in North America. Livestock grazing is globally the most widespread rangeland us...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding and monitoring the dynamics of rangeland heterogeneity through time and across space is critical for the effective management and conservation of rangeland systems and the sustained supply of the ecosystem goods and services they provide. Conventional approaches (both field-based and remote sensing) to monitoring rangeland productivit...
Article
Full-text available
In semi-arid ecosystems, timing and availability of water is a key uncertainty associated with conservation planning for wetland-dependent wildlife. Wetlands compose only 1-3% of these landscapes; however, large populations of migratory waterbirds rely on these wetlands to support energetically demanding life history events such as breeding and mig...
Article
Full-text available
A recent paper by Coe et al. (2018) calls into question juniper removal for sagebrush obligate species based on results from a correlative study of mule deer habitat use. Our rebuttal clarifies limitations of inference in their study regarding mule deer habitat quality, highlights the importance of winter forage on demography with omitted literatur...
Article
Migration is a critical strategy in maintaining populations, and pathways used by individuals lend insight into habitat quality and connectivity. Yet sustaining migration among large-ranging wildlife poses a challenge for conservation, particularly among landscapes that include a diverse matrix of land tenure. Such is the case in the Northern Great...
Article
Full-text available
Rangelands cover 40‐50% of the earth's terrestrial surface. While often characterized by limited, yet variable resource availability, rangelands are vital for humans, providing numerous ecosystem goods and services. In the conterminous United States (CONUS) the dominant component of rangeland conservation is a network of public rangelands, concentr...
Article
Full-text available
Single species conservation unites disparate partners for the conservation of one species. However, there are widespread concerns that single species conservation biases conservation efforts towards charismatic species at the expense of others. Here we investigate the extent to which sage grouse (Centrocercus sp.) conservation, the largest public-p...
Data
Proportion of species distributions held within PACs. (PDF)
Data
Proportional coverage under Zonation scenarios, by species. (PDF)
Data
Proportion of species distributions held within PACs, by taxon. (PDF)
Data
Proportion of species distribution falling outside study region. (PDF)
Data
Species-area curves for the four Zonation scenarios. (PDF)
Data
Proportion of distribution at risk, by species. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
The North American semi-arid sagebrush, Artemisia spp., biome exhibits considerable climatic complexity driving dynamic spatiotemporal shifts in primary productivity. Greater and Gunnison sage-grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus and C. minimus, are adapted to patterns of resource intermittence and rely on stable adult survival supplemented by occasio...
Article
Full-text available
Innovations in machine learning and cloud‐based computing were merged with historical remote sensing and field data to provide the first moderate resolution, annual, percent cover maps of plant functional types across rangeland ecosystems to effectively and efficiently respond to pressing challenges facing conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
Management of public lands, and who should have access to them, is often contentious. Most ranches in the western US rely upon seasonal grazing access to public lands, and conflict over biodiversity management has led to proposals to restrict grazing access on public lands. We evaluate whether grazing restrictions on public rangelands could have th...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration of riparian and wet meadow ecosystems in semi‐arid rangelands of the western U.S. is a high priority given their ecological and hydrological importance in the region. However, traditional restoration approaches are often intensive and costly, limiting the extent over which they can be applied. Practitioners are increasingly trying new r...