David Nance

David Nance
University of Aberdeen | ABDN · Department of Geography and Environment

About

6
Publications
1,171
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13
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
13 Citations
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Introduction
David Nance currently studies at the Department of Geography and Environment, University of Aberdeen. David does research in landscape archaeology and prehistoric religion. His most recent publication is 'A Calanais myth and an alignment of the east stone-row with both the rising of the Pleiades and crossovers of Venus at sunrise on the summer solstices'.

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Sacred kings of Late Iron Age northern Britain are thought to have symbolised fertility and considered responsible for the wellbeing of the lands and people; components of a system of governance maintained by conservative religious beliefs and champions of a local goddess of sovereignty, also associated with the cuckoo and the planet Venus. Their r...
Article
Full-text available
A group of intervisible prehistoric monuments delineate a ritual landscape of 10² kilometres near Hatton of Fintray, Aberdeenshire. They act as back and foresights on solar and lunar horizon rising and setting extremes when viewed one from another. The identities of the local deities, syncretised as parish saints, an ethnographic analogy with pre-C...
Article
Full-text available
A myth asserts that at sunrise on the summer solstice ‘something’ came to the Calanais Stones’ central ring heralded by the cuckoo’s call. This paper investigates which of the three celestial objects easily visible at sunrise, the Sun, Moon and Venus, might be referred to. The stones have no obvious orientation with the Sun and, while a ‘window’ of...
Article
Full-text available
The Gundestrup “cauldron” is a late Iron-Age silver ceremonial vessel found in Denmark in 1891. The busts depicted on the seven outer-plates – one is missing – are thought to represent deities but have not been confidently identified. This paper identifies the species of the birds on plate f and its symbolism allowing identification of the deity, t...
Article
Full-text available
The common cuckoo was a pre-Christian symbol of male fertility across Eurasia, associated with several European fertility goddesses. Some standing-stones are named after it as cuckoo (coucou is Old-French) or gowk (Anglo-Saxon). Gouk and cuckoo stones can only have been so named from the fifth and eleventh centuries respectively but at least one st...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
To identify which mounds currently labelled as mottes are Neolithic in origin. Coring of mounds to obtain dating material.