David Magleby

David Magleby
Brigham Young University - Provo Main Campus | BYU · Department of Political Science

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49
Publications
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1,106
Citations

Publications

Publications (49)
Book
Cambridge Core - American Studies - Who Donates in Campaigns? - by David B. Magleby
Article
BYU Studies has a long history of publishing the annual lecture given by the recipient of the Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecturer Award, BYU's highest faculty honor. It is with great pleasure that BYU Studies Quarterly publishes this year's lecture by Dr. David B. Magleby, a professor of political science. His speech was delivered as a fo...
Article
The scholarly literature provides mixed guidance on the question of whether DREs or optical scan systems inspire greater confidence. We bring new evidence to bear on the debate using a unique exit poll and a nationally representative survey, both of which examine a wide range of voting experiences. Having detailed information about voting experienc...
Article
Previous research has shown that Independents who lean towards the Democratic or Republican parties exhibit voting behavior similar to outright partisans. Less attention has been paid to the policy positions of Independent leaners. In this article we compare the policy positions of Independent leaners, Strong and not very strong Democrats and Repub...
Chapter
This chapter revisits the findings and conclusions reached in The Myth of the Independent Voter (1992), which shows independents in the electorate from 1952 (the first year in which the ANES asked respondents for their party identification) through 1988. Furthermore, the chapter addresses, where needed, some of the claims and concerns that still ci...
Article
The 2008 election was an extraordinary event that represented change at many levels. The candidates" innovative campaigns changed how funds were raised, how voters were mobilized, and how messages were communicated through advertising and the internet. Parties and interest groups played their own important role in this historic election. In The Cha...
Article
The BCRA soft money ban enacted in 2002 posed a serious challenge to Democrats. Could they compete in fundraising with the Republicans in a hard money only environment? Some even went so far as to suggest that BCRA was a "suicide bill" for the Democrats. Such dire predictions have not proven true. Democrats have exploited good candidates, strong pa...
Article
Full-text available
The experiences in Florida in 2000 and Ohio in 2004 demonstrate that the election process can fall short of voters' expectations. In the wake of reforms, such as the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) of 2002, scholars have attempted to identify ways in which the objective conditions in polling places shape citizens' experiences and overall confidence in...
Article
The dramatic growth in the numbers of individuals contributing to presidential candidates and the surge in total amounts being contributed has generated substantial media attention in the 2008 presidential election. Individuals are giving more, in part, because the 2002 Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) raised contribution limits and encouraged...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The 2004 presidential election cycle witnessed a number of political changes. Perhaps one of the most significant developments was the creation ofAmerica Votes, a coalition of 32 progressive interest groups that sought to “increase voter registration, education and participation in electoral politics” (America Votes 2005). The literature o...
Article
The “Stand by Your Ad” (SBYA) provision of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act requires federal candidates to claim responsibility for their advertising content. Using an experimental survey design to show respondents actual campaign ads with and without the SBYA language, we find that SBYA produces no effect on respondents’ levels of trust in candi...
Article
Although there has been extensive research on campaign spending in general elections, less is known about the effects of campaign spending in primary elections. We use data from 1984-98 in the U.S. House to compare primary and general elections and examine incumbent and challenger spending in different types of primary elections: in-party (challeng...
Article
Using ballot initiatives, voters in several states have recently voted to concentrate more power in their state governments at the expense of local autonomy and experimentation. Whether the issue is gay rights, rent control, regulation of hazardous waste facilities, zoning, or tax policy, initiative activists have frequently sought to reverse local...
Article
Proponents of direct legislation maintain that the initiative and popular referendum empower ordinary citizens to set the agenda of politics. Some argue it shifts “ultimate authority from representatives in state legislatures, city councils, and even Congress to the people themselves” (Schmidt 1989, vii). Such elections, so the argument goes, produ...
Article
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
The amount of money needed to run a competitive congressional campaign is staggering, with special interests playing a central role in raising these funds. Also of concern is the declining competitiveness of House elections. And while recognition of the need to reform campaign financing is widespread, partisan and House/Senate differences over what...
Article
Introduction An Historical and Political Profile of Four States An Overview of Fifteen Elections, 1976-80 Political Context and Issues Campaign Expenditures The Campaign I - Media Intensive Campaigns The Campaign II - Grass Roots Activity Voting Behavior Confusion and Rationality on Ballot Question The 1982 Elections High Spending, Old Issues Revis...
Article
California, Kansas, Oregon, and Washington now permit localities to conduct elections entirely by mail on such matters as tax and spending referendums, approval of school levies, and election of commissioners of special purpose districts. The largest mail ballot elections have been in San Diego, California, and in Portland, Oregon, where together o...
Article
For almost a decade we have taken issue with the prevailing view of independent voters. We showed that Independents, as they were usually defined, had nothing in common, and in fact were more diverse than either Democrats or Republicans. Virtually no generalizations about Independents were correct, except by accident, because they comprise three ve...
Article
The growth of the Internet has introduced a new dynamic to campaign fundraising, both in terms of solicitation and mode of contribution. The Barack Obama campaign was successful in raising large numbers of contributions at all levels online. In contrast, the Republicans with the exception of Ron Paul continue to be a party that relies heavily on ma...
Article
Why do individuals contribute to political campaigns? In this paper we investigate factors that affected whether individuals donated to presidential candidates in the 2008 elections. In particular, we investigate the extent that Obama donors differ from other donors. The Obama campaign reportedly mobilized many new donors, particularly small donors...

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