David Lesbarrères

David Lesbarrères
Environment Canada | EC · Science and Technology Branch

PhD

About

112
Publications
25,279
Reads
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2,034
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2004 - present
Laurentian University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2002 - August 2004
University of Helsinki
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2001 - August 2002
University of Angers
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (112)
Article
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To the Editor: Although the relationship between the emergence of zoonotic diseases and human influenced landscapes is accepted, the relationship between human-influenced landscapes and wildlife disease is less so. Evidence does support correlations between human activities and environmental conditions affecting wildlife disease emergence. These st...
Article
Abstract Considerable effort has been invested in studying the relationship between fitness and genetic variability. While evidence exists both for and against positive genetic variability-fitness correlations (GFC), the possible environment and population-dependency of GFCs has seldom been tested. We investigated GFCs in common frog (Rana temporar...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases are a significant threat to global biodiversity. While historically overlooked, a group of iridoviruses in the genus Ranavirus has been responsible for die-offs in captive and wild amphibian, reptile and fish populations around the globe over the past two decades. In order to share contemporary information on ranaviruse...
Article
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Roads impede animal movement, which decreases habitat accessibility and reduces gene flow. Ecopassages have been built to mitigate this but there is little research with which to evaluate their effectiveness, owing to the difficulty in accessing results of existing research; the lack of scientific rigor in these studies; and the low priority of con...
Article
1. Recently habitat degradation, road construction and traffic have all increased with human populations, to the detriment of aquatic habitats and species. While numerous restoration programmes have been carried out, there is an urgent need to follow their success to better understand and compensate for the decline of amphibian populations. To this...
Article
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Environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring is rapidly becoming an established approach for detecting the presence of aquatic organisms and may also be useful for indexing or estimating species abundance. However, the link between eDNA concentration and abundance of individuals (i.e., density or biomass) remains tenuous and may vary widely across species a...
Article
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Despite the documented effects on human and animal health, particles smaller than 0.1 µm in diameter found in soils, sediments, and the atmosphere remain unregulated. Yet, cerium and titanium oxide nanoparticles associated with traffic increase mortality, cause behavioral changes, and inhibit the growth in amphibians. Mites of the genus Hannemania...
Article
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In an era where emerging infectious diseases are a serious threat to biodiversity, epidemiological patterns need to be identified, particularly the complex mechanisms driving the dynamics of multi-host pathogens in natural communities. Many amphibian species have faced unprecedented population declines associated with diseases. Yet, specific proces...
Article
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Chytridiomycosis, a primary disease driving widespread and unprecedented amphibian declines, is caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Tracking Bd through space and time requires monitoring protocols that efficiently and reliably assess pathogen prevalence and intensity, which in turn requires an understanding of environ...
Article
Roads are one of the most prevalent threats to wildlife because they fragment landscapes and increase mortality. In response to the threat of roads to population persistence, road-effect mitigation strategies are increasingly common, typically as a combination of exclusion fencing to reduce mortality and crossing structures to enhance connectivity....
Article
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Dispersal following metamorphosis is critical for sustaining anuran metapopulations. Mink Frog (Lithobates septentrionalis) is a primarily aquatic species that is common in eastern Canada. The species is not well studied, and little is known about the terrestrial dispersal of recently metamorphosed individuals. Here we present our observations on t...
Article
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Animals use color both to conceal and signal their presence, with patterns that match the background, disrupt shape recognition, or highlight features important for communication. The forms that these color patterns take are responses to the visual systems that observe them and the environments within which they are viewed. Increasingly, however, t...
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Mass mortality events (MMEs) can remove up to 90% of individuals in a population, and are especially damaging to population viability of long-lived species with slow life histories. Our goal was to elucidate the cause(s) of a MME of 53 Blanding’s turtles (Emydoidea blandingii (Holbrook, 1838)), a globally endangered species, in a protected area. We...
Article
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Ranaviruses are large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses that infect ectothermic vertebrates. Here we report the results of a scientometric analysis of the field of ranavirology for the last 10 years. Using bibliometric tools we analyse trends, identify top publications and journals, and visualise the ranavirus collaboration landscape. The Web of Scienc...
Article
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Roads are one of the most severe threats to wildlife globally because of their pervasive and linear nature. Despite considerable attention afforded to road-effects on animals generally, little information is available concerning the specific impacts of road widening, also known as twinning or highway expansion. To address this gap, we monitored the...
Article
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Abstract: Ranaviruses have been associated with rising numbers of mass die-offs in amphibian populations around the globe. However, most studies on ranaviruses to date focused on larval amphibians. To assess the role of post-metamorphic amphibians in the epidemiology of ranaviruses and to determine the role of viral immune-suppression genes, we per...
Article
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Pathogen-induced population declines and extinction events have been recognized as main threats to amphibian species around the globe. However, the ecological drivers underlying epidemiological patterns are still poorly understood. In an attempt to assess the current knowledge on the ecological drivers of amphibian diseases, we identified 832 peer-...
Article
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The negative effects of roads on wildlife have been well studied, and their mitigation is considered of critical importance to conservation. Mitigation of these threats commonly incorporates exclusion fencing and landscape connectivity structures, but the mechanics of mitigation success and species-specific responses are poorly understood. Eastern...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases are responsible for declines in wildlife populations around the globe. Mass mortality events associated with emerging infectious diseases are often associated with high number of infected individuals (prevalence) and high pathogen loads within individuals (intensity). At the landscape scale spatial and temporal variatio...
Article
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Significant advances have been made to minimize the detrimental effects of roads on wildlife, but little is known about unintended negative consequences of mitigation strategies. Here, we present observations of adverse effects on herpetofauna of exclusion fencing at Presqu’ile Provincial Park, Ontario. A total of 15 individuals (one salamander, ni...
Article
Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, and these declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic factors, including disease. Among the pathogens associated with amphibian mortality, ranaviruses have caused massive die-offs across continents. In North America, frog virus 3 (FV3) is a widespread ranavirus that can infect wild and capti...
Article
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Frog virus 3 (FV3) and FV3-like ranaviruses can infect a variety of cold-blooded aquatic species and present a primary threat to amphibians across the globe. Previous studies of FV3-like viruses have largely investigated higher-level phylogenetic distinctions of these pathogens via portions of the conserved major protein (MCP), and the putative vir...
Preprint
Ranaviruses have been associated with rising numbers of mass die-offs in amphibian populations globally. With life-stages occupying different environments and presenting distinct physiologies, amphibian of different ages are likely to play an important role in pathogen persistence. To assess the potential role of post-metamorphic amphibians as a Ra...
Article
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Investigation of mortalities in isolated wild amphibian populations presents diagnostic difficulties that can hinder reaching a definitive diagnosis for the cause of death. Disease can only be diagnosed when pathogen presence (e.g. PCR) is linked to tissue lesions (histopathology) in the host. We report a two-site outbreak of ranavirosis in wild an...
Article
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Research on the amphibian skin microbiota has focused on identifying bacterial taxa that deter a pathogenic chytrid fungus, and on describing patterns of microbiota variation. However, it remains unclear how environmental variation affects amphibian skin bacterial communities, and whether the overall functional diversity of the amphibian skin micro...
Article
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Freshwater turtles are one of the most imperilled groups of vertebrates globally, and roads have been associated with their decline. Although roads are typically viewed as an imminent threat to population persistence, because of direct mortality and increased landscape fragmentation, we argue that they are an important sampling tool for collecting...
Article
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The mitigation of road-effects on wildlife, especially road mortality and habitat fragmentation, has become increasingly common in the last 20 years. However, exclusion fencing and habitat connectivity structures can be very costly and several questions remain regarding how to best determine locations that will optimize mitigation success. Based on...
Article
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Context: Amphibians are particularly susceptible to the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation. The construction and use of roads is among the most common sources of habitat fragmentation and can lead to serious population declines. Unused resource access roads, such as those formerly used for logging, can still negatively impact salamanders and...
Article
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Pollution can affect wildlife directly through toxicity and indirectly through changes in biotic and abiotic factors, however, how these mechanisms interact in affecting free-ranging animals remains poorly understood. By examining effects on individual fitness proxies, we aimed to determine the mechanisms behind documented amphibian and reptile dec...
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Pollinating insects are vital to the survival of many primary producers in terrestrial ecosystems, as up to 80–85 % of the world’s flowering plants require pollinators for reproduction. Over the last few decades however, numerous pollinating insect populations have declined substantially. The causes of these declines are multifaceted and synergisti...
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Transmission is a central feature of pathogen fitness and influences host population dynamics. The form and magnitude of transmission rates determine whether a pathogen establishes itself in a host population and the proportion of a population that becomes infected. While the effects of environmental variation on pathogen transmission dynamics have...
Article
Trace metals can have subtle, yet chronic impacts on organisms by inducing physiological stress that reduces their survival or impedes their ability to tolerate additional environmental stressors. However, toxicity literature indicates that aquatic organisms react differently to trace metals depending on the environments in which they reside. The o...
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Where post‐glacial colonization and founder events are numerous, peripheral populations tend to have reduced genetic diversity as compared to their centrally located counterparts. Such decrease in genetic variability can limit their potential to adapt to changes in their environment. At northern latitudes for instance, populations are often living...
Chapter
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Amphibian populations are at risk of adverse impacts from roads and traffic. Roads constructed in the vicinity of wetlands and streams often interrupt amphibian movement pathways and can prevent individuals from accessing critical habitats. High numbers of amphibians are either deterred from crossing or killed by traffic, contributing to population...
Article
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Emissions from smelting not only contaminate water and soil with metals, but also induce extensive forest dieback and changes in resource availability and microclimate. The relative effects of such co-occurring stressors are often unknown, but this information is imperative in developing targeted restoration strategies. We assessed the role and rel...
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Roadways pose serious threats to animal populations. The installation of roadway mitigation measures is becoming increasingly common, yet studies that rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of these conservation tools remain rare. A highway expansion project in Ontario, Canada included exclusion fencing and ecopassages as mitigation measures designe...
Article
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Infections by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and members of the genus Ranavirus (Rv) are increasingly reported as significant determinants of amphibian population die-offs. The complexity associated with their transmission and spatial distribution leads to an increase in demand for comprehensive reporting systems and global...
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The context-dependent investigations of host–pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of...
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Frog virus 3 (FV3) is the type species of the genus Ranavirus, and in the past few decades, FV3 infections have resulted in considerable morbidity and mortality in a range of wild and cultivated amphibian species in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. The reasons for the pathogenicity of FV3 are not well understood. We investigated three FV3 isolates d...
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Conservation biology integrates multiple disciplines to expand the ability to identify threats to populations and develop mitigation for these threats. Road ecology is a branch of conservation biology that examines interactions between wildlife and roadways. Although the direct threats of road mortality and habitat fragmentation posed by roads have...
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Population level response to hypoxia has become an issue of global significance because of increased frequency and intensity of hypoxic events worldwide, and the potential for global warming to exacerbate hypoxic stress. In this study, we sequenced two nuclear intronic regions and a single mitochondrial region across seven populations of the Africa...