David B Lank

David B Lank
Simon Fraser University · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD Cornell University

About

206
Publications
36,908
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Introduction
David B Lank currently works at the Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University. David focuses on Behavioural and Population Ecology of shorebirds, including mating systems, breeding and migration biology, and relationships between predator and prey. Most of his current work with with shorebirds, plus the conservation biology of marbled murrelets.
Additional affiliations
August 1993 - present
Simon Fraser University
Position
  • Researcher
May 1983 - July 1993
Queen's University
Position
  • Research Associate
January 1983 - September 1983

Publications

Publications (206)
Article
Full-text available
Chromosomal inversions frequently underlie major phenotypic variation maintained by divergent selection within and between sexes. Here we examine whether and how intralocus conflicts contribute to balancing selection stabilizing an autosomal inversion polymorphism in the ruff Calidris pugnax. In this lekking shorebird, three male mating morphs (Ind...
Article
Full-text available
The Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a small seabird that is currently listed as threatened in Canada. Understanding this species’ marine habitat preferences plays a vital role in our ability to focus conservation planning. We used the longest-running at-sea survey dataset available in British Columbia to examine hotspot persistence a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chromosomal inversions frequently underlie major phenotypic variation maintained by divergent selection within and between sexes. Here we examine whether and how intralocus conflicts contribute to balancing selection stabilizing an autosomal inversion polymorphism in the ruff Calidris pugnax. In this lekking shorebird, three male mating morphs (Ind...
Article
Full-text available
Chromosomal inversions are structural rearrangements that frequently provide genomic substrate for phenotypic diversity. In the ruff Philomachus pugnax , three distinct male reproductive morphs (Independents, Satellites and Faeders) are genetically determined by a 4.5 Mb autosomal inversion. Here we test how this stable inversion polymorphism affec...
Article
Full-text available
Average annual temperatures in the Arctic increased by 2–3 °C during the second half of the twentieth century. Because shorebirds initiate northward migration to Arctic nesting sites based on cues at distant wintering grounds, climate-driven changes in the phenology of Arctic invertebrates may lead to a mismatch between the nutritional demands of s...
Article
The evolution of social behavior depends on genetic changes, yet, how genomic variation manifests itself in behavioral diversity is still largely unresolved. Chromosomal inversions can play a pivotal role in producing distinct behavioral phenotypes, in particular, when inversion genes are functionally associated with hormone synthesis and signaling...
Article
Full-text available
Background Age at maturity and the timing of first breeding are important life history traits. Most small shorebird species mature and breed as ‘yearlings’, but have lower reproductive success than adults. In some species, yearlings may defer northward migration and remain in non-breeding regions (‘oversummering’) until they reach 2 years of age. S...
Article
Full-text available
The evolutionary and behavioural ecology of migratory birds has received much theoretical and empirical attention. We contribute to this field by contrasting the weather at departure and stopover durations of a long‐distance migratory sandpiper prior to initiating lengthy transoceanic vs. transcontinental flights of potentially variable duration. T...
Article
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Many shorebirds (Order: Charadriiformes; Family: Charadriidae, Recurvirostridae, Scolopacidae, Haematopodidae, Jacanidae) are highly migratory, traversing thousands of kilometers between high latitude breeding and low latitude nonbreeding sites. In doing so, they are dependent on networks of coastal and interior wetland ecosystems. To aid in the ef...
Article
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Conservation status and management priorities are often informed by population trends. Trend estimates can be derived from population surveys or models, but both methods are associated with sources of uncertainty. Many Arctic-breeding shorebirds are thought to be declining based on migration and/or overwintering population surveys, but data are lac...
Preprint
Full-text available
The evolution of social behavior depends on genetic changes, yet, how genomic variation manifests itself in behavioral diversity is still largely unresolved. Chromosomal inversions can play a pivotal role in producing distinct behavioral phenotypes, in particular, when inversion genes are functionally associated with hormone synthesis and signaling...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies on sexual size dimorphism address proximate and functional questions related to adults, but sexual size dimorphism usually develops during ontogeny and developmental trajectories of sexual size dimorphism are poorly understood. We studied three bird species with variation in adult sexual size dimorphism: black coucals (females 69% heav...
Article
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Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) have undergone a steady hemisphere-wide recovery since the ban on DDT in 1973, resulting in an ongoing increase in the level of danger posed for migrant birds, such as Arctic-breeding sandpipers. We anticipate that in response migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) have adjusted migratory behavior, i...
Article
Full-text available
Chewing lice often appear benign; however, they can also negatively impact their hosts. We know little about seasonal and spatial variation in the exposure, acquisition, or loss of these putative ectoparasites by shorebirds. Here we provide the first description of chewing lice richness and occurrence from seven shorebird species captured in the Pa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Peregrine falcons ( Falco peregrinus ) have undergone a steady hemisphere-wide recovery since the ban on DDT in 1973, resulting in an ongoing increase in the level of danger posed for migrant birds, such as Arctic-breeding sandpipers. We anticipate that in response migrant semipalmated sandpipers ( Calidris pusilla ) have adjusted migratory behavio...
Article
Full-text available
Responses to climate change can vary across functional groups and trophic levels, leading to a temporal decoupling of trophic interactions or ‘phenological mismatches.’ Despite a growing number of single‐species studies that identified phenological mismatches as a nearly universal consequence of climate change, we have a limited understanding of th...
Article
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Supernormal clutches are found across bird species. Such clutches often result from more than one female laying eggs in the same nest and can reflect different behaviours from parasitism to laying mistakes. Enlarged clutches are readily visible among waders due to a maximum maternal clutch size of four eggs, yet surprisingly little is known about t...
Article
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Marking wild birds is an integral part of many field studies. However, if marks affect the vital rates or behavior of marked individuals, any conclusions reached by a study might be biased relative to the general population. Leg bands have rarely been found to have negative effects on birds and are frequently used to mark individuals. Leg flags, wh...
Article
Full-text available
Telomeres are highly conserved regions of DNA that protect the ends of linear chromosomes. The loss of telomeres can signal an irreversible change to a cell's state, including cellular senescence. Senescent cells no longer divide and can damage nearby healthy cells, thus potentially placing them at the crossroads of cancer and ageing. While the epi...
Article
Full-text available
Seasonal declines in breeding performance are widespread in wild animals, resulting from temporal changes in environmental conditions or from individual variation. Seasonal declines might drive selection for early breeding, with implications for other stages of the annual cycle. Alternatively, selection on the phenology of nonbreeding stages could...
Article
Full-text available
Many Arctic shorebird populations are declining, and quantifying adult survival and the effects of anthropogenic factors is a crucial step toward a better understanding of population dynamics. We used a recently developed, spatially explicit Cormack-Jolly-Seber model in a Bayesian framework to obtain broad-scale estimates of true annual survival ra...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is experiencing rapidly warming temperatures, increasing predator abundance, and diminishing population cycles of keystone species such as lemmings. However, it is still not known how many Arctic animals will respond to a changing climate with altered trophic interactions. We studied clutch size, incubation duration, and nest survival of...
Article
Full-text available
Biological impacts of climate change are exemplified by shifts in phenology. As the timing of breeding advances, the within-season relationships between timing of breeding and reproductive traits may change and cause long-term changes in the population mean value of reproductive traits. We investigated long-term changes in the timing of breeding an...
Article
Full-text available
Seasonal declines in breeding performance are widespread in wild animals, resulting from temporal changes in environmental conditions or from individual variation. Seasonal declines might drive selection for early breeding, with implications for other stages of the annual cycle. Alternatively, selection on the phenology of nonbreeding stages could...
Article
Full-text available
Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) populations have undergone significant declines at core nonbreeding sites in northeastern South America. Breeding populations have also declined in the eastern North American Arctic, but appear to be stable or increasing in the central and western Arctic. To identify vulnerable populations and sites, we doc...
Article
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Large-scale changes in predator populations are occurring worldwide due to (re-)introductions, over-exploitation, or recovery after decimation by pesticides and persecution. These widespread changes may affect the distribution of their prey. We studied the continental-scale distributions of non-breeding Calidris alpina pacifica and C. a. hudsonia (...
Article
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We compiled a >50-year record of morphometrics for semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla), a shorebird species with a Nearctic breeding distribution and intercontinental migration to South America. Our data included >57,000 individuals captured 1972–2015 at five breeding locations and three major stopover sites, plus 139 museum specimens collec...
Article
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We placed wire mesh predator exclosures around the nests of Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus at a tundra site outside of Nome, Alaska, in 2011 and 2012. Exclosures were made of 2.5 cm × 5.1 cm wire mesh and were approximately 0.8 m high, 0.8 m in diameter, with a flat top, and were secured to the ground with three metal stakes. We compared...
Article
Full-text available
The behavioural rhythms of organisms are thought to be under strong selection, influenced by the rhythmicity of the environment. Such behavioural rhythms are well studied in isolated individuals under laboratory conditions, but free-living individuals have to temporally synchronize their activities with those of others, including potential mates, c...
Article
Full-text available
The behavioural rhythms of organisms are thought to be under strong selection, influenced by the rhythmicity of the environment1-4. Such behavioural rhythms are well studied in isolated individuals under laboratory conditions1,5, but free-living individuals have to temporally synchronize their activities with those of others, including potential ma...
Article
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Migration distances of shorebird species correlate with life history strategies. To assess age-specific migratory preparation and adult wing-molt strategies, we studied Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) and Semipalmated Sandpipers (C. pusilla) with different migration routes at the Paracas National Reserve in Perú, one of the most austral non-bre...
Article
Full-text available
Background Geolocators are useful for tracking movements of long-distance migrants, but potential negative effects on birds have not been well studied. We tested for effects of geolocators (0.8–2.0 g total, representing 0.1–3.9 % of mean body mass) on 16 species of migratory shorebirds, including five species with 2–4 subspecies each for a total of...
Article
Full-text available
Three strikingly different alternative male mating morphs (aggressive 'independents', semicooperative 'satellites' and female-mimic 'faeders') coexist as a balanced polymorphism in the ruff, Philomachus pugnax, a lek-breeding wading bird. Major differences in body size, ornamentation, and aggressive and mating behaviors are inherited as an autosoma...
Article
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In mark-recapture studies conducted on fixed-area study sites, apparent (or "local") survival (φ) is the product of the probabilities of true survival (S) and site fidelity to the sampling area (F). If marked individuals permanently emigrate from the study site, apparent survival will be biased low relative to true survival. Similarly, estimates of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Shorebirds have wide variation in life history strategies. Among and within species, greater migration distances relate to slow “oversummering” versus fast strategies, assessed by juveniles’ propensity to migrate and breed during the first spring. As indices of age-specific migratory preparation from one of the most austral non-breeding areas, we c...
Article
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Understanding the forces driving population dynamics is critical for species conservation and population management. For migratory birds, factors that regulate population abundance could come from effects experienced on breeding areas, wintering grounds, or during migration. We compiled survey data for Pacific and Atlantic subspecies of dunlins (Ca...
Article
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Sequence variation in the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene explains color morph variation in several species of birds and mammals. Ruffs (Philomachus pugnax) exhibit major dark/light color differences in melanin-based male breeding plumage which is closely associated with alternative reproductive behavior. A previous study identified a microsate...
Article
Full-text available
Fisher's sex ratio theory predicts that on average parents should allocate resources equally to the production of males and females. However, when the cost/benefit ratio for producing males versus females differs, the theory predicts that parents may bias production, typically through underproduction of the sex with greater variation in fitness. We...
Article
Full-text available
Sex differences in skews of vertebrate lifetime reproductive success are difficult to measure directly. Evolutionary histories of differential skew should be detectable in the genome. For example, male-biased skew should reduce variation in the biparentally inherited genome relative to the maternally inherited genome. We tested this approach in lek...
Article
Full-text available
Males of many species theoretically face a fitness tradeoff between mating and parental effort, but quantification of this is rare. We estimated the magnitude of the mating opportunity cost paid by incubating male Temminck’s stints (Calidris temminckii), taking advantage of uniparental care provided by both sexes in this species. “Incubating males”...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological theory for long-distance avian migration considers time-, energy-, and mortality-minimizing tactics, but predictions about the latter have proven elusive. Migrants must make behavioral decisions that can favor either migratory speed or safety from predators, but often not both. We compare the behavior of adult and juvenile western sandpi...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts that if extending parental care delays migratory departure, and if later migration is more dangerous, then parental care should be curtailed to make an earlier departure. Adult western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) depart Alaska in July, and the presence of peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) along their route rises steeply during th...
Chapter
With a population estimate of approximately 3.5 million individuals (Bishop et al. 2000), the Western Sandpiper is one of the most abundant shorebirds in the Western Hemisphere, despite its restricted breeding range in coastal tundra regions of western Alaska and far-eastern Siberia. The majority of the global population spends the boreal winter i...
Article
Full-text available
Ruffs (Aves: Philomachus pugnax) possess a genetic polymorphism for male mating behaviour resulting in three permanent alternative male reproductive morphs: (i) territorial 'Independents', (ii) non-territorial 'Satellites', and (iii) female-mimicking 'Faeders'. Development into independent or satellite morphs has previously been shown to be due to...
Article
Full-text available
Many bird species show spatial or habitat segregation of the sexes during the non-breeding season. One potential ecological explanation is that differences in bill morphology favour foraging niche specialisation and segregation. Western sandpipers Calidris mauri have pronounced bill size dimorphism, with female bills averaging 15% longer than those...