David King

David King
Birmingham Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust · Paediatric oncology

BSc (Hons) MBChB (Hons) MRCPCH, PhD

About

40
Publications
40,721
Reads
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612
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
543 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Locum consultant in paediatric oncology. Previously clinical lecturer in paediatrics at the University of Sheffield. I have an interest in how DNA repair is altered in childhood cancer and whether this can be therapeutically exploited.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - July 2018
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
January 2015 - January 2018
The University of Sheffield
Field of study
  • Molecular oncology
August 2012 - July 2014
University of Leeds
Field of study
  • Child Health
July 2011 - July 2011

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Constipation in children is common and is a frequent cause for healthcare attendances in both primary and secondary care. The Bristol Stool Chart has become ubiquitous as an aid in the diagnosis and treatment of constipation, but many clinicians may not be aware of its origins or strengths and weaknesses. In this article, we outline the history and...
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Despite intensive high-dose multimodal therapy, high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) confers a less than 50% survival rate. This study investigates the role of replication stress in sensitivity to inhibition of Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) in pre-clinical models of high-risk NB. Amplification of the oncogene MYCN always imparts high-risk di...
Article
Hodgkin's lymphoma accounts for approximately 40% of all lymphomas presenting in childhood and can be associated with a variety of dermatologic manifestations. Here, we describe a case of Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting with Stevens‐Johnson syndrome. Clinicians should be aware of this association, especially if no alterative trigger for Stevens‐Johns...
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Full-text available
Background In neuroblastoma, genetic alterations in ATRX, define a distinct poor outcome patient subgroup. Despite the need for new therapies, there is a lack of available models and a dearth of pre-clinical research. Methods To evaluate the impact of ATRX loss of function (LoF) in neuroblastoma, we utilized CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to generate ne...
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This study investigates the influence expression of the MYCN oncogene has on the DNA damage response, replication fork progression and sensitivity to PARP inhibition in neuroblastoma. In a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines, MYCN amplification or MYCN expression resulted in increased cell death in response to a range of PARP inhibitors (niraparib, v...
Article
Advances in the treatment of childhood cancer have led to significant numbers of children surviving into adulthood and beyond. There is therefore an increasing focus on reduction of long-term effects of treatment including subfertility. In this article, we give an overview of the different methods of fertility preservation and how to discuss this i...
Article
What you need to know: • Computed tomography (CT) neuroimaging for children with head injury carries a small increased risk of malignancy • There is limited low quality evidence that vomiting following head injury in children, in the absence of other clinical features, is not frequently associated with intracranial complications • In children wi...
Thesis
Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid childhood cancer. Amplification of the oncogene MYCN confers high-risk status and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. MYCN amplification in neuroblastoma may lead to an increased dependency on cellular pathways such as the DNA damage response (DDR) which can be targeted using novel small mo...
Article
Moyamoya syndrome is an unusual cerebrovascular disorder, which has rarely been reported in association with hereditary spherocytosis. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy with hereditary spherocytosis who was diagnosed with Moyamoya syndrome following a stroke. We discuss why these conditions may coexist and briefly outline the management of su...
Article
The teaching and training of doctors-in-training in paediatrics has become increasingly challenging in recent times. All too often there is a perception that training must come second to service provision. In this article, the case of a child with community-acquired pneumonia is considered and used to illustrate how a culture of teaching can be emb...
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Background Suboptimal adherence to inhaled steroids is common in children with asthma and is associated with poor disease control, reduced quality of life and even death. Previous studies using feedback of electronically monitored adherence data have demonstrated improved adherence, but have not demonstrated a significant impact on clinical outcome...
Article
Purpose: This paper presents a statistical approach for the prediction of trabecular bone parameters from low-resolution multisequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children, thus addressing the limitations of high-resolution modalities such as HR-pQCT, including the significant exposure of young patients to radiation and the limited applica...
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Full-text available
Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 is a gene-editing technology causing a major upheaval in biomedical research. It makes it possible to correct errors in the genome and turn on or off genes in cells and organisms quickly, cheaply and with relative ease. It has a number of laboratory applications including rapid gener...
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Paediatric sepsis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. However, in a primary care setting it remains uncommon. This is a review of the current understanding of paediatric sepsis together with evidence-based advice about its recognition and management in primary care.
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Poor inhaler technique is common in children with asthma. It has been estimated that at least 50% of patients do not use their inhalers properly.1 This is associated with asthma instability, an increase in hospital attendances and a reduced quality of life.2 The media can encourage safe health practices but can also have negative effects on health...
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Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a congenital growth disorder characterised by abdominal wall defects, macroglossia and somatic gigantism. A number of associated features, including gastrointestinal and urinary tract polyps, have been described, but there are no previous reports of oral polyps occurring in this syndrome. We describe the first c...
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Plunkett and Tong advocate using the “paediatric sepsis six” in the management of children with sepsis.1 This is stated to be an operational tool designed to improve adherence to national guidelines. However, given that it includes advice on diagnosis and recognition of sepsis it is also likely to …
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Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial cancer in childhood. High-risk neuroblastoma continues to have a poor prognosis and there is an urgent need to design biologically based therapies that specifically target the pathways responsible for malignant transformation and progression. One such pathway is the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In this articl...
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Context: Bone mass is low and fracture risk is higher in obese children. Hormonal changes in relation to skeletal microstructure and biomechanics have not been studied in obese children. Objective: The objective of the study was to ascertain the relationships of obesity-related changes in hormones with skeletal microstructure and biomechanics....
Article
Background: Bone mass is low and fracture risk is higher in obese children. We wished to ascertain the relationships of obesity-related changes in hormones with skeletal microstructure. Method: Children aged 8–15 years matched by gender and pubertal stage were recruited into lean and obese groups (18 pairs). We used high resolution peripheral quant...
Article
In his article about the supposed cognitive benefits of reading printed books, Tobin neglects an important issue.1 The possible environmental cost of doctors reading printed media is significant. Worldwide the paper industry is the fifth …
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Full-text available
You are a senior house officer working in a busy district general hospital in the UK. A 2-year-old child presents following a generalised tonic-clonic seizure that lasted around 1 min. He had recently been unwell with a cough and runny nose and was febrile at the time of the seizure. He now appears well and is running around the ward. You diagnose...
Article
Introduction Obese children have a greater fracture risk. Studies utilising DXA and pQCT have demonstrated that bone mass and size relative to body size is reduced in obese children. However, these imaging modalities cannot quantify alterations in bone microstructure and strength in obese children. The advent of High Resolution peripheral Quantitat...
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Fareed, a 15-year-old British boy of Pakistani origin, was brought to his general practitioner (GP). His parents had become concerned about a ‘lump’ which had recently appeared on his neck and had now been present for approximately 2 weeks. Fareed had been unwell in the last fortnight with a history of a mild fever, coryzal symptoms and a sore thro...
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Capillary refill time (CRT) is defined as the time taken for colour to return to an external capillary bed after pressure is applied to cause blanching.1 It was first described in 19472 and has since become widely adopted as part of the rapid structured circulatory assessment of ill children. Its use has been incorporated into advanced paediatric l...
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You are a senior house officer (SHO) working in a busy district general hospital. A 9-month-old boy is brought in by his parents with a fever of 2 days duration. There is no obvious focus but the child appears well. A urine dipstick is negative. When reviewing the child, the registrar is concerned to learn that the fever has not responded to parace...
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Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an increasingly used treatment modality in adults, but its use and effectiveness in pediatric brain tumors is still uncertain. We describe 3 patients with metastatic relapse of medulloblastoma, who were treated with SRS, and achieved prolonged, progression-free survival. Tolerability of the treatment was excellent...
Article
Crohn's disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory bowel disorder, often associated with cutaneous manifestations, termed metastatic Crohn's. Here we present two cases of paediatric metastatic Crohn's disease involving the penis, focusing on clinical presentation, histological diagnosis and treatment.
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Full-text available

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am currently using SHEP-1 neuroblastoma cells. I have been advised to use EMEM:DMEM in a ratio of 50:50 with 10% FCS. Our lab mainly stocks DMEM so we are having to buy in the EMEM separately which is a bit of pain. Has anyone used DMEM with 10% FCS alone to grow these cells?

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