David Jandzik

David Jandzik
Comenius University Bratislava

phd

About

190
Publications
36,567
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1,294
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Introduction
David Jandzik currently works at the Department of Zoology, Comenius University in Bratislava. David does research in Evolutionary Developmental Biology, Herpetology, Biogeography, and Zoology.

Publications

Publications (190)
Preprint
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The vertebrate brain emerged more than ~500 million years ago in common evolutionary ancestors. To systematically trace its cellular and molecular origins, we established a spatially resolved cell type atlas of the entire brain of the sea lamprey - a jawless species whose phylogenetic position affords the reconstruction of ancestral vertebrate trai...
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The origin and diversification of appendage types is a central question in vertebrate evolution. Understanding the genetic mechanisms that underlie fin and limb development can reveal relationships between different appendages. Here we demonstrate , using chemical genetics, a mutually agonistic interaction between Fgf and Shh genes in the developin...
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Vertebrates have distinct tissues which are not present in invertebrate chordates nor other metazoans. The rise of these tissues also coincided with at least one round of whole-genome duplication as well as a suite of lineage-specific segmental duplications. Understanding whether novel genes lead to the origin and diversification of novel cell type...
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In the last decade, the CRISPR/Cas9 bacterial virus defense system has been adapted as a user-friendly, efficient, and precise method for targeted mutagenesis in eukaryotes. Though CRISPR/Cas9 has proven effective in a diverse range of organisms, it is still most often used to create mutant lines in lab-reared genetic model systems. However, one ma...
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Background The application of molecular-phylogenetic approaches to taxonomy has had a dramatic effect on our understanding of the diversity of reptiles. These approaches have allowed researchers to reveal previously hidden lineages as well as taxonomic overestimation in morphologically plastic taxa. Slow worms, legless lizards of the genus Anguis (...
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The Mediterranean Basin has experienced extensive change in geology and climate over the past six million years. Yet, the relative importance of key geological events for the distribution and genetic structure of the Mediterranean fauna remains poorly understood. Here, we use population genomic and phylogenomic analyses to establish the evolutionar...
Article
The slow-worm lizards (Anguis) comprise five species occurring throughout most of the Western Palearctic. Although these species are relatively uniform morphologically – with the exception of A. cephallonica, which exhibits a quite unique morphology – they are genetically deeply divergent. Here, we provide detailed distribution maps for each species...
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Jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) have been the dominant lineage of deuterostomes for nearly three hundred fifty million years. Only a few lineages of jawless vertebrates remain in comparison. Composed of lampreys and hagfishes (cyclostomes), these jawless survivors are important systems for understanding the evolution of vertebrates. One focus of c...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Mediterranean Basin has experienced extensive change in geology and climate over the past six million years. Yet, the relative importance of key geological events for the distribution and genetic structure of the Mediterranean fauna remains poorly understood. Here, we use population genomic and phylogenomic analyses to establish the evolutionar...
Article
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The Levant represents one of the most important reptile diversity hotspots and centers of endemism in the Western Palearctic. The region harbored numerous taxa in glacial refugia during the Pleistocene climatic oscillations. Due to the hostile arid conditions in the warmer periods they were not always able to spread or come into contact with popula...
Article
The evolution of vertebrates from an invertebrate chordate ancestor involved the evolution of new organs, tissues, and cell types. It was also marked by the origin and duplication of new gene families. If, and how, these morphological and genetic innovations are related is an unresolved question in vertebrate evolution. Hyaluronan is an extracellul...
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Morphological diversification during adaptive radiation may depend on factors external or internal to the lineage. We provide evidence for the latter in characiform fishes (tetras and piranhas), which exhibit extensive dental diversity. Phylogenetic character mapping supported regain of lost teeth as contributing to this diversity. To test for late...
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No central online repository exists for the collection of animal images; hence it remains unclear how extensively species have been illustrated in the published literature or online. Here we compiled a list of more than 8000 reptile species (out of 11,341) that have photos in one of six popular online repositories, namely iNaturalist (6,349 species...
Preprint
Full-text available
The evolution of vertebrates from an invertebrate chordate ancestor involved the evolution of new organs, tissues, and cell types. It was also marked by the origin and duplication of new gene families. If, and how, these morphological and genetic innovations are related is an unresolved question in vertebrate evolution. Hyaluronan is an extracellul...
Article
Full-text available
Neural crest cells (NCCs) are migratory, multipotent embryonic cells that are unique to vertebrates and form an array of clade-defining adult features. The evolution of NCCs has been linked to various genomic events, including the evolution of new gene-regulatory networks1,2, the de novo evolution of genes³ and the proliferation of paralogous genes...
Article
Significance The evolution of jaws in early vertebrates provided such a predatory advantage that 99% of vertebrate species living today are jawed. What is often overlooked, however, is another structural innovation that happened concurrently and may have been equally critical to the lineage’s success: the evolution of musculoskeletal gill covers to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Morphological diversification during adaptive radiation may depend on factors external or internal to the lineage. We provide evidence for the latter in characiform fishes (tetras and piranhas), which exhibit extensive dental diversity. Phylogenetic character mapping supported regain of lost teeth as contributing to this diversity. To test for late...
Preprint
Full-text available
Whereas the gill chambers of extant jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfish) open directly into the environment, jawed vertebrates evolved skeletal appendages that promote the unidirectional flow of oxygenated water over the gills. A major anatomical difference between the two jawed vertebrate lineages is the presence of a single large gill cover...
Preprint
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The neural crest (NC) is a vertebrate-specific embryonic tissue that forms an array of clade-defining adult features. A key step in the formation of these diverse derivatives is the partitioning of NC cells into subpopulations with distinct migration routes and potencies. The evolution of these developmental modules is poorly understood. Endothelin...
Book
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Bibliographies provide basic scientific information, illustrate quality and intensity of research in a particular topic, area, or time, and thus help build a cultural-historical perspective of society’s appreciation of knowledge and education. Here we provide a bibliography of herpetological research in the region of Slovakia between the years 1791...
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Background: The rat snake genus Elaphe once comprised several dozens of species distributed in temperate through tropical zones of the New and Old World. Based on molecular-genetic analyses in early 2000s, the genus was split into several separate genera, leaving only 15 Palearctic and Oriental species as its members. One of the three species also...
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The smooth snake, Coronella austriaca, is a common snake species widespread in the Western Palearctic region. It does not form conspicuous morphological variants and, although several evolutionary lineages have been distinguished based on the analyses of the mitochondrial DNA sequences, only two subspecies with very limited distribution have been t...
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The maternal origin of isolated populations of the common wall lizard (Podracis muralis) in the Czech Republic, representing the northeastern range border of the species, was addressed. We compared mitochondrial DNA sequences of the cytochrome b gene of samples from these populations with those from within the continuous range in Slovakia, the nort...
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In most vertebrates, pharyngeal arches form in a stereotypic anterior-to-posterior progression. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying evolutionary changes in pharyngeal arch development, here we investigate embryos and larvae of bichirs. Bichirs represent the earliest diverged living group of ray-finned fishes, and possess intriguing trait...
Article
Climatic changes during the Pleistocene played an instrumental role in the shaping recent distribution and diversity of the Western Palearctic biota. Range oscillations often lead to allopatric differentiation followed by the establishment of secondary contact zones. As a result, many species are composed of complex networks of phylogenetic lineage...
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Despite the wide variety of adaptive modifications in the oral and facial regions of vertebrates, their early oropharyngeal development is considered strictly uniform. It involves sequential formation of the mouth and pharyngeal pouches, with ectoderm outlining the outer surface and endoderm the inner surface, as a rule. At the extreme anterior dom...
Article
The apparent evolvability of the vertebrate head skeleton has allowed a diverse array of shapes, sizes, and compositions of the head in order to better adapt species to their environments. This encompasses feeding, breathing, sensing, and communicating: the head skeleton somehow participated in the evolution of all these critical processes for the...
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Neural crest cells (NCCs) are highly patterned embryonic cells that migrate along stereotyped routes to give rise to a diverse array of adult tissues and cell types. Modern NCCs are thought to have evolved from migratory neural precursors with limited developmental potential and patterning. How this occurred is poorly understood. Endothelin signali...
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Full-text available
Background Genetic architecture of a species is a result of historical changes in population size and extent of distribution related to climatic and environmental factors and contemporary processes of dispersal and gene flow. Population-size and range contractions, expansions and shifts have a substantial effect on genetic diversity and intraspecif...
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Complete mitochondrial genome of the Peloponnese endemic lizard species Anguis cephallonica is pre- sented in this study. The complete sequence is 17 208 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and one control region. The gene order is same as in the relative spe- cies Anguis fragilis. Length of the 22 tRNA ge...
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Lamprey is one of only two living jawless vertebrates, a group that includes the first vertebrates. Comparisons between lamprey and jawed vertebrates have yielded important insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate physiology, morphology, and development. Despite its key phylogenetic position, studies of lamprey have been limited by thei...
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Background Retinoic acid (RA) signaling controls many developmental processes in chordates, from early axis specification to late organogenesis. The functions of RA are chiefly mediated by a subfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. While RARs have been extensivel...
Article
A defining feature of vertebrates (craniates) is a pronounced head that is supported and protected by a robust cellular endoskeleton. In the first vertebrates, this skeleton probably consisted of collagenous cellular cartilage, which forms the embryonic skeleton of all vertebrates and the adult skeleton of modern jawless and cartilaginous fish. In...
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Axanthism in amphibians is a relatively rare color aberration reported less often than leucism or albinism. It is caused by lack of specific types of pigment cells in the skin, namely xanthophores, erythrophores, and iridophores. Here, we present the first case of occurrence of this aberration in a widely distributed toad of the green toad (Bufote...
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The morphology of the vertebrate head skeleton is highly plastic, with the number, size, shape, and position of its components varying dramatically between groups. While this evolutionary flexibility has been key to vertebrate success, its developmental and genetic bases are poorly understood. The larval head skeleton of the frog Xenopus laevis pos...
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The apparent irreversibility of the loss of complex traits in evolution (Dollo's Law) has been explained either by constraints on generating the lost traits or the complexity of selection required for their return. Distinguishing between these explanations is challenging, however, and little is known about the specific nature of potential constrain...
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It is the first time that Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), causing potentially lethal disease of humans, has been reported from the Middle East region and from the tortoise tick Hyalomma aegyptium from a tortoise host, whose epidemiological significance may have remained almost completely overlooked so far. We used RT-PCR to screen f...
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A defining feature of vertebrates (craniates) is a pronounced head supported and protected by a cellularized endoskeleton. In jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), the head skeleton is made of rigid three-dimensional elements connected by joints. By contrast, the head skeleton of modern jawless vertebrates (agnathans) consists of thin rods of flexible...
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Temperature and precipitation are amongst the most important characteristics of local climatic conditions affecting the breeding biology of birds. Many bird species experiencing higher temperatures lay their eggs earlier and/or have bigger clutches. Higher precipitation can lead to a decrease in food availability and/or an increase of the costs of...
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Understanding the factors that drive geographic variation in life history is an important challenge in evolutionary ecology. Here, we analyze what predicts geographic variation in life-history traits of the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara, which has the globally largest distribution range of all terrestrial reptile species. Variation in body size w...
Article
Four species of legless anguid lizard genus Anguis have been currently recognized: A. fragilis from western and central Europe, A. colchica from eastern Europe and western Asia, A. graeca from southern Balkans, and A. cephallonica from the Peloponnese. Slow worms from the Italian Peninsula have been considered conspecific with A. fragilis, despite...
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Grass snakes (Natrix natrix) represent one of the most widely distributed snake species of the Palaearctic region, ranging from the North African Maghreb region and the Iberian Peninsula through most of Europe and western Asia eastward to the region of Lake Baikal in Central Asia. Within N. natrix, up to 14 distinct subspecies are regarded as valid...