David M P Jacoby

David M P Jacoby
Lancaster University | LU · Lancaster Environment Centre

B.Sc, M.Res, Ph.D

About

68
Publications
32,405
Reads
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1,652
Citations
Citations since 2017
50 Research Items
1405 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300
20172018201920202021202220230100200300
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - present
Lancaster University
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2019 - August 2021
Institute of Zoology
Position
  • Research Associate
March 2013 - August 2019
Institute of Zoology
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
Full-text available
Analyses of animal social networks have frequently benefited from techniques derived from other disciplines. Recently, machine learning algorithms have been adopted to infer social associations from time-series data gathered using remote, telemetry systems situated at provisioning sites. We adapt and modify existing inference methods to reveal the...
Article
New technologies have vastly increased the available data on animal movement and behaviour. Consequently, new methods deciphering the spatial and temporal interactions between individuals and their environments are vital. Network analyses offer a powerful suite of tools to disentangle the complexity within these dynamic systems and we review these...
Article
Full-text available
Interest in animal personalities has generated a burgeoning literature on repeatability in individual traits such as boldness or exploration through time or across different contexts. Yet, repeatability can be influenced by the interac-tive social strategies of individuals, for example, consistent inter-individual variation in aggression is well do...
Article
Full-text available
1. Determining how animals move within their environment is a fundamental knowledge that contributes to effective management and conservation. Continuous ‘round-the-clock’ animal movement data are frequently gathered using biotelemetry technology, providing discrete data packages on the presence–absence of animals at known locations through time. C...
Article
Full-text available
Anguillid eels are near globally distributed catadromous fishes with marine spawning areas and inshore and inland growth areas in both lotic (rivers, estuaries) and lentic (lakes, ponds, lagoons) water bodies. As predators, anguillid eels play an important ecological role in both marine and freshwater systems, and several species are harvested comm...
Article
The behaviour of the tompot blenny Parablennius gattorugine was studied by underwater observation and photography on the south‐west coast of the U.K. over an 11 year period, with more than 50 individuals identified at two locations by their distinctive skin markings. Observations showed males engaging in rapid swimming behaviour when approached by...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the three-dimensional movement patterns of elasmobranchs is vital to understand their ecological roles and exposure to anthropogenic pressures. To date, comparative studies among species at global scales have mostly focused on horizontal movements. Our study addresses the knowledge gap of vertical movements by compiling the first globa...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the three-dimensional movement patterns of elasmobranchs is vital to understand their ecological roles and exposure to anthropogenic pressures. To date, comparative studies among species at global scales have mostly focused on horizontal movements. Our study addresses the knowledge gap of vertical movements by compiling the first globa...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Northwestern Pacific is a data-poor region for studies into the movements and habitat use of open ocean and pelagic sharks. However, this region experiences considerable pressure from commercial fishing. Therefore, shark movement data from this region carry significant implications for conservation and management, particularly for th...
Article
Movement of fishes in the aquatic realm is fundamental to their ecology and survival. Movement can be driven by a variety of biological, physiological, and environmental factors occurring across all spatial and temporal scales. The intrinsic capacity of movement to impact fish individually (e.g., foraging) with potential knock‐on effects throughout...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are significantly threatened by multiple environmental stressors associated with climate change. While there is growing recognition of the importance of interacting stressors on coral reefs, so far this has been primarily limited to in situ studies. Satellite remote sensing has potential for investigating coral reef exposure to multiple...
Article
Full-text available
Despite our critical dependence on aquatic wildlife, we lack a complete understanding of the drivers of population stability and structure for most fish species. Social network analysis has been increasingly used to investigate animal societies as it explicitly links individual decision-making to population-level processes and demography. While the...
Article
Full-text available
Natural history documentary films can be a powerful tool for wildlife conservation, providing an accessible means to increase public knowledge of the natural world. There has been an increasing focus in documentary films on the threats to biodiversity in recent years that has positively aided conservation efforts. However, potential ethical and wel...
Article
Full-text available
We are in the midst of a revolution in satellite technology, with the rapid development and advancement of small satellites (or SmallSats, i.e., satellites <180 kg). Here, we review the opportunities and challenges that such technology might afford in the field of conservation and ecology. SmallSat constellations may yield higher resolutions than t...
Article
Full-text available
Shark dive ecotourism is a lucrative industry in many regions around the globe. In some cases, sharks are provisioned using bait, prompting increased research on how baited dives influence shark behavior and yielding mixed results. Effects on patterns of habitat use and movement seemly vary across species and locations. It is unknown, however, whet...
Article
• As an increasingly important resource in ecological research, citizen scientists have proven dynamic and cost-effective in the supply of data for use within habitat suitability models. With predictions critical to the provision of effective conservation measures in cryptic marine species, this study delivers baseline ecological data for the Criti...
Article
Full-text available
106,107 ✉ replying to A. V. Harry & J. M. Braccini Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03463-w (2021) Our global analysis 1 estimated the overlap and fishing exposure risk (FEI) using the space use of satellite-tracked sharks and longline fishing effort monitored by the automatic identification system (AIS). In the accompanying Comment, Harry...
Article
This article is a response to Murua et al.'s Matters Arising article in Nature, "Shark mortality cannot be assessed by fishery overlap alone," which arose from arising from N. Queiroz et al. Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1444-4 (2019).
Preprint
Full-text available
Coral reefs are critical ecosystems globally for marine fauna, biodiversity and through the services they provide to humanity. However, they are significantly threatened by anthropogenic stressors, such as climate change. By combining 9 environmental variables and ecological and health-based thresholds obtained from the available literature, we dev...
Article
Full-text available
Area coverage of large-scale marine protected areas (MPAs) (LSMPAs, > 100,000 km2) is rapidly increasing globally. Their effectiveness largely depends on successful detection and management of non-compliance. However, for LSMPAs this can be difficult due to their large size, often remote locations and a lack of understanding of the social drivers o...
Article
Full-text available
• A wide array of technologies are available for gaining insight into the movement of wild aquatic animals. Although acoustic telemetry can lack the fine‐scale spatial resolution of some satellite tracking technologies, the substantially longer battery life can yield important long‐term data on individual behavior and movement for low per‐unit cost...
Article
Full-text available
Silky sharks (Carcharhinus falciformis) represent a major component of global shark catch, both directly and as bycatch, and populations are declining as a result. An improved understanding of their movement ecology is needed to support conservation efforts. We deployed satellite and acoustic tags (2013-2018) and analyzed historical fisheries recor...
Article
Full-text available
Given the recent trend towards establishing very large marine protected areas (MPAs) and the high potential of these to contribute to global conservation targets, we review outcomes of the last decade of marine conservation research in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT), one of the largest MPAs in the world. The BIOT MPA consists of the atol...
Article
Animals across vertebrate taxa form social communities and often exist as fission–fusion groups. Central place foragers (CPF) may form groups from which they will predictably disperse to forage, either individually or in smaller groups, before returning to fuse with the larger group. However, the function and stability of social associations in pre...
Article
Full-text available
Large, remote marine protected areas (MPAs) containing both reef and pelagic habitats, have been shown to offer considerable refuge to populations of reef‐associated sharks. Many large MPAs are, however, impacted by illegal fishing activity conducted by unlicensed vessels. While enforcement of these reserves is often expensive, it would likely bene...
Article
Mobulid populations are declining on a global scale as a result of both targeted fisheries and indirect anthropogenic threats. In order to implement effective conservation strategies for species of this taxa, it is crucial that movement patterns at a range of spatiotemporal scales are defined. To gain insight into such patterns, we deployed a combi...
Article
Full-text available
The U.S. Congress is currently discussing the Shark Fin Sales Elimination Act to eliminate shark fin trade at the federal level. This bill was introduced in 2017 and has been proceeding very slowly in Congress because of mixed reviews from the scientific community. Debate exists on whether shark conservation and management are effectively addressed...
Preprint
Background There are now a wide array of field and laboratory techniques available for gaining insight into the movement and behaviour of sharks. Although acoustic telemetry may lack the fine-scale resolution of some satellite technologies, the low cost and longer battery life make it a powerful tool for investigating elasmobranch behaviour. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
There is no shortage of opinions on the impact of artificial intelligence and deep learning. We invited authors of Comment and Perspective articles that we published in roughly the first half of 2019 to look back at the year and give their thoughts on how the issue they wrote about developed.
Preprint
Full-text available
Background There are now a wide array of field and laboratory techniques available for gaining insight into the movement and behaviour of sharks. Although acoustic telemetry may lack the fine-scale resolution of satellite telemetry, the low cost and longer battery life make it a powerful tool for investigating elasmobranch behaviour. Here, in the a...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Animal movement patterns are increasingly analysed as spatial networks. Currently, structures of complex movements are typically represented as a single-layer (or monoplex) network. However, aggregating individual movements, to generate population-level inferences, considerably reduces information on how individual or species variability influen...
Article
Full-text available
Effective ocean management and conservation of highly migratory species depends on resolving overlap between animal movements and distributions and fishing effort. Yet, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach combining satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of...
Article
Full-text available
While movements of organisms have been studied across a myriad of environments, information is often lacking regarding spatio-seasonal patterning in complex temperate coastal systems. Highly mobile fish form an integral part of marine food webs providing linkages within and among habitats, between patches of habitats, and at different life stages....
Article
Full-text available
Global elasmobranch populations have declined dramatically over the past 50 years, and continued research into the drivers of their habitats and distributions is vital for improved conservation and management. How environmental factors influence elasmobranch behavior, habitat use, and movement patterns is still relatively poorly understood, in part...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
https://methodsblog.com/2019/03/26/research-gaps-in-animal-social-network-analysis/ Here at Methods in Ecology & Evolution and the Journal of Animal Ecology we are excited by the new directions that the next decade of research into animal social networks will bring. We hope to encourage new advances in the study of animal social networks by callin...
Article
Full-text available
Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to be an invaluable tool for nature conservation, but its misuse could have severe real-world consequences for people and wildlife. Conservation scientists discuss how improved metrics and ethical oversight can mitigate these risks.
Chapter
Full-text available
In recent decades, network analyses have become ubiquitous in ecology, facilitating our understanding of linkages between paired entities, whether it be genes, proteins, individuals, species, or habitats (Blüthgen et al., 2008; Croft et al., 2008; Krause et al., 2007; Proulx et al., 2005; Wey et al., 2008). Network theory (also known as graph theor...
Article
Full-text available
Animal movements can facilitate important ecological processes, and wide-ranging marine predators, such as sharks, potentially contribute significantly towards nutrient transfer between habitats. We applied network theory to 4 years of acoustic telemetry data for grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) at Palmyra, an unfished atoll, to assess...
Article
New technologies have vastly increased the available data on animal movement and behaviour. Consequently, new methods deciphering the spatial and temporal interactions between individuals and their environments are vital. Network analyses offer a powerful suite of tools to disentangle the complexity within these dynamic systems, and we review these...
Article
Full-text available
The behaviour of the tompot blenny Parablennius gattorugine was studied from a long-term underwater photographic record from two sites on the south-west coast of the U.K. Repeated observations of individually identifiable P. gattorugine during 112 dives revealed that male P. gattorugine may guard eggs in a particular crevice over subsequent breedin...
Article
Full-text available
The movement rates of sharks are intrinsically linked to foraging ecology, pred- ator–prey dynamics and wider ecosystem functioning in marine systems. During ram ventilation, however, shark movement rates are linked not only to ecological parameters, but also to physiology, as minimum speeds are required to provide sufficient water flow across the...
Article
Full-text available
With broad distributions, diadromous fishes can be exposed to multiple threats at different stages of development. For the primarily catadromous eels of the family Anguillidae, there is growing international concern for the population abundance and escapement trends of some of these species and yet incomplete knowledge of their remarkable life-hist...
Conference Paper
From 1st - 5th July 2013, a workshop was convened in London by the IUCN Anguillid Specialist Sub-Group (ASSG), where global eel experts assessed 13 of the 16 anguillid species under the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. Prior to the workshop only five anguillids had been globally assessed and it was widely agreed that a full assessment of thes...
Article
This study was designed to address whether juvenile small spotted catsharks Scyliorhinus canicula aggregate and to determine whether potential aggregation is underpinned by social preferences for conspecifics. Using controlled and replicated experiments, the role of familiarity as a potential mechanism driving aggregation and social behaviour in th...
Article
Full-text available
The role of relatedness in structuring animal societies has attracted considerable interest. Whilst a significant number of studies have documented kin recognition in shoaling fish under laboratory conditions, there is little evidence that relatedness plays a significant role in structuring social interactions in wild populations that are character...
Article
Full-text available
Studying the complex relationships and structure of the feral goat on Lundy facilitates the understanding of sociality. Vigilance behaviour and behaviour repertoires were assessed using continuous and instantaneous focal sampling. Correlations and regression models found that vigilance behaviour was associated with grazing and mobility and dependan...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple paternity (MP) has been demonstrated in a variety of sharks, although its prevalence and the number of sires per litter vary considerably among species. To date, such analyses have focused on viviparous species that possess only part of the wide spectrum of reproductive strategies developed in elasmobranchs. We analyzed MP in an oviparous...
Article
There are widespread records of grouping behaviour in both adult and juvenile sharks and rays (Class Chondrichthyes, Subclass Elasmobranchii). Yet despite burgeoning descriptions of these events, many of the proximate and ultimate causes of group living in these top predators remain elusive. Given the documented negative anthropogenic effects on ma...
Article
Full-text available
Marine predators such as sharks often form single-sex aggregations as part of their diel behavioral cycle. Such aggregations are potentially driven by contrasting reproductive and behavioral strategies between the sexes, leading to distinct sexual segregation. There is, however, no experimental evidence that such predator aggregations are governed...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Working in conjunction with government bodies and water companies, this project aims to use high resolution acoustic telemetry systems and network analyses to investigate European eel moment around reservoirs, combined with abiotic datasets to develop predictive models to enable forecasting of eel movement and behaviour under a range of management scenarios, thus providing an evidence-driven tool to inform protection and passage strategies for this critically endangered species.
Project
This Special Feature in Methods in Ecology and Evolution and Journal of Animal Ecology is meant to be a continuation of the Animal Social Network Symposium that took place at the XXXVIII Sunbelt 2018, with the presentation of new concepts and tools for Social Network Analysis (SNA) applied in different topics of animal research. With this joint special feature, Sebastian Sosa, Mathieu Lihoreau, David Jacoby and Cédric Sueur are willing to promote the multidisciplinary approach of SNA in animal research, bringing together researchers from different fields and working with a large variety of biological models (plants, insects, primates) to showcase the latest developments in SNA techniques and integrate them into a general analytical framework. It is intended to provide the readership with a cross-disciplinary overview of state-of-the-art of SNA tools in animal research and delineate hot topics for the decade to come. We are soliciting original research capturing novel methodological developments or applications of social network theory to new empirical questions. These papers should be addressing outstanding questions in fields that include (but not restricted to) evolutionary ecology, behavioural ecology, disease and parasite biology, wildlife conservation, and theory. Manuscripts should be submitted in the usual way through the Journal of Animal Ecology or Methods in Ecology and Evolution websites. Submissions should clearly state in the cover letter accompanying the submission that you wish to be considered for publication as part of this Special Feature. Pre-submission enquiries are not necessary, but any questions can be directed to : admin@journalofanimalecology.org or coordinator@methodsinecologyandevolution.org The deadline for submission is: Monday 5 August.