David Instone-Brewer

David Instone-Brewer
University of Cambridge | Cam · Tyndale House

Doctor of Theology

About

26
Publications
8,177
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
130
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
37 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
The Munich Talmud manuscript of b.San.43a preserves passages censored out of the printed editions, including the controversial trial of 'Yeshu NotzrV. Chronological analysis of the layers in this tradition suggests that the oldest words are: 'On the Eve of Passover they hung Jesus of Nazareth for sorcery and leading Israel astray. ' This paper argu...
Article
Full-text available
Review of James Dunn's collected essays. The first chapter has not been published previously, and is a masterly summary of his views on Works of the Law etc.
Article
The wording of one version of the Eighteen Benedictions, which is preserved in a Geniza fragment (T‐S K27.33b), appears to assume that the Temple is still standing, in two lines which are usually not printed. Other features of this version also suggest that it preserves wording which originates from the Second Temple period. It also includes...
Article
Jewish Women Divorcing Their Husbands in Early Judaism: The Background to Papyrus Ṣeʾelim 13 - Volume 92 Issue 3 - David Instone Brewer
Article
Deuteronome 24 : 1-4 est devenu la base de la loi du divorce juif. Pour l'A. le propos de ce passage est de decourager les divorces hâtifs et de permettre aux femmes divorcees de pouvoir se remarier plus facilement. Le consensus general, comme c'est le cas dans la plupart des traductions modernes, veut comprendre ce texte comme une serie de clauses...
Article
When Paul interprets ‘Do not muzzle the ox while threshing’ as ‘do not neglect to pay Christian ministers’, commentators have quite naturally assumed that his exegesis was allegorical. However, comparisons with contemporary rabbinic exegesis suggest that this would have been regarded as a literal interpretation of the plain meaning of the text.
Article
Full-text available
The writing on the wall interpreted by Daniel continues to present problems, 1 despite much work done in the past. One particular problem is why the Babylonians could not read these Aramaic words when Aramaic was an official court language. This paper will propose that the inscription was a number written in cuneiform, which was translated into Ara...
Article
Full-text available
The first half of this study explored 1 Corinthians 7 in the light of the Graeco-Roman Greek and Latin marriage and divorce papyri. 1 These papyri showed that much of 1 Corinthians 7 has its basis in Graeco-Roman vocabulary and social structures. The believers at Corinth were facing the problem that divorce under Graeco-Roman law was legally comple...
Article
The language and social background of 1 Corinthians 7 are compared with that of the Greek and Latin marriage and divorce papyri. These papyri are found to be particularly useful for illuminating the issue of divorce-by-separation, which Paul appears to be combating in vv. 10-15. They also give insights into Paul's unusual use of ἀφίημι for 'divorce...
Article
Matthew chapter 2 appears to pull proof texts out of the Hebrew Scriptures in an almost random way. However, when it is read in the light of the ancient additions to the story of Balaam, the texts form the structure of a sermon based on Balaam's star. Early Jewish sources allude to a story about Balaam who, in the identity of Laban, tried to kill R...
Article
Full-text available
God is described in the Old Testament as married to Israel and Judah, and in the New Testament the church is described as the Bride of Christ. The marriage to Israel ended in divorce and the marriage to Judah suffered a period of separation. Paul suggests that this marriage ended when Christ died, in order that Christ would be free to marry the Chu...

Network

Cited By