David F Hill

David F Hill
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Civil and Construction Engineering

PhD

About

98
Publications
24,865
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,399
Citations
Citations since 2017
31 Research Items
1492 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor
January 2010 - August 2016
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (98)
Article
Full-text available
In late spring of 1992, Christopher McCandless crossed the Teklanika River, west of Healy, Alaska (United States). His summer has been well documented both in the book and the movie ‘Into the Wild.’ In early summer of 1992, he attempted to cross back over the river, but was stopped by high waters and he died later that summer. This paper investigat...
Article
Feedback between flow transformation by submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and bed morphodynamics influences the long-term survivability of SAV habitats and the engineering services that SAV provides. We conducted a full-scale wave flume experiment to investigate the mechanisms through which finite patches of mimic SAV produce shoreward depositiona...
Article
Full-text available
Bottom friction is an important process in coastal and estuarine environments because it can reduce wave heights and moderate tidal currents. When modeling large systems with spatially varying hydraulic properties, bottom friction values are commonly derived from land use classification products. However, estimation of bottom friction for vegetated...
Article
Full-text available
A physically based snowpack evolution and redistribution model was used to test the effectiveness of assimilating crowd-sourced snow depth measurements collected by citizen scientists. The Community Snow Observations (CSO; https://communitysnowobs.org/, last access: 11 August 2021) project gathers, stores, and distributes measurements of snow depth...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this study, we examine the effectiveness of incorporating citizen science snow depth measurements into the seasonal snow model chain through data assimilation. We also introduce the Community Snow Observations dataset, a citizen science based snow depth measuring campaign. Improvements to model performance are characterized and evaluated using r...
Article
Full-text available
We demonstrate a linking of moderately high resolution (1 km) terrestrial hydrological models to a 3‐D ocean circulation model having similar resolution in the northern Gulf of Alaska, where a distributed line source of freshwater runoff exerts strong influence over the shelf's hydrographic structure and flow dynamics. The model interfacing is acco...
Article
Full-text available
The coastal ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is especially vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification and climate change. Detection of these long-term trends requires a good understanding of the system’s natural state. The GOA is a highly dynamic system that exhibits large inorganic carbon variability on subseasonal to interannual timesc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The coastal ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is especially vulnerable to the effects of ocean acidification and climate change that can only be understood within the context of the natural variability of physical and chemical conditions. Controlled by its complex bathymetry, iron enriched freshwater discharge, and wind and solar radi...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists and engineers have observed for some time that tidal amplitudes at many locations are shifting considerably due to non-astronomical factors. Here we review comprehensively these important changes in tidal properties, many of which remain poorly understood. Over long geological time-scales, tectonic processes drive variations in basin siz...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change impacts on extreme water levels (WLs) at two United States Pacific Northwest estuaries are investigated using a multicomponent process-based modeling framework. The integrated impact of climate change on estuarine forcing is considered using a series of sub-models that track changes to oceanic, atmospheric, and hydrologic controls on...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme water levels generating flooding in estuarine and coastal environments are often driven by compound events, where many individual processes such as waves, storm surge, streamflow, and tides coincide. Despite this, extreme water levels are typically modeled in isolated open-coast or estuarine environments, potentially mischaracterizing the t...
Article
Full-text available
We present a simple method that allows snow depth measurements to be converted to snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates. These estimates are useful to individuals interested in water resources, ecological function, and avalanche forecasting. They can also be assimilated into models to help improve predictions of total water volumes over large regio...
Article
Full-text available
A high spatial resolution (250 m), distributed snow evolution and ablation model, SnowModel, is used to estimate current and future scenario freshwater runoff into Glacier Bay, Alaska, a fjord estuary that makes up part of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. The watersheds of Glacier Bay contain significant glacier cover (tidewater and land-ter...
Article
Full-text available
A high spatial resolution (250 m), distributed snow evolution and ablation model, SnowModel, is used to estimate current and future freshwater runoff into Glacier Bay, Alaska; a fjord estuary that makes up part of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GBNPP). The watershed of Glacier Bay contains significant glacier cover (tidewater and land-term...
Article
Full-text available
We present a simple method that allows snow depth measurements to be converted to snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates. These estimates are useful to individuals interested in water resources, ecological function, and avalanche forecasting. They can also be assimilated into models to help improve predictions of total water volumes over large regio...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme water levels driving flooding in estuarine and coastal environments are often compound events, generated by many individual processes like waves, storm surge, streamflow, and tides. Despite this, extreme water levels are typically modeled in isolated open coast or estuarine environments, potentially mischaracterizing the true risk to floodi...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change impacts to extreme water levels (WLs) at two United States Pacific Northwest estuaries are investigated using a multi-component process-based modeling framework. The integrated impact of climate change on estuarine forcing is considered using a series of sub-models that track changes to oceanic, atmospheric, and hydrologic controls o...
Article
Full-text available
Combined tidal and wave events are simulated over an idealized marsh environment to quantifiably characterize the cross-shore attenuation of wave height as a function of bottom roughness and submergence depth. Dissipation calculated by the numerical model is compared with existing analytically derived parametric wave height decay models. We propose...
Article
A new project harnesses the power of the winter backcountry recreation community to gather data that are vital to understanding snow, from winter hazards to water resources.
Article
Full-text available
Approximately 14% of the world's population-1.1 billion people-live without access to electricity, and countless more lack access to reliable electricity. This article looks at electrification opportunities via small hydropower strategically placed within rural communities. We approach the challenge through a unique blend of technical feasibility a...
Research
Full-text available
This is an errata for our 2007 paper. The Journal could not find a reviewer so I have put it up here for future researcher to use it and it also gives ideas for future work.
Article
Full-text available
High-resolution regional-scale hydrologic models were used to quantify the response of late 21st century runoff from the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) watershed to changes in regional climate and glacier extent. NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data were combined with five Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 General Circulation Models (GCM)...
Article
Full-text available
While global climate models (GCMs) are useful for simulating climatic responses to perturbations in the Earth's climate system, there are many instances where higher spatial resolution information is necessary. In all instances, interpretation of interpolated or downscaled GCMs must be done cautiously because each method has its own set of assumpti...
Article
Full-text available
Sea-level rise is a global problem, yet to forecast future changes, we must understand how and why relative sea level (RSL) varied in the past, on local to global scales. In East and Southeast Asia, details of Holocene RSL are poorly understood. Here we present two independent high-resolution RSL proxy records from Belitung Island on the Sunda Shel...
Data
Supplementary Figures, Supplementary Tables, Supplementary Note and Supplementary References
Article
Models that seek to predict environmental variables invariably demonstrate bias when compared to observations. Bias correction (BC) techniques are common in the climate and hydrological modeling communities, but have seen fewer applications to the field of wave modeling. In particular there has been no investigation as to which BC methodology perfo...
Article
In support of efforts to reconstruct relative sea level (RSL), we investigated the utility of foraminifera, diatoms and bulk-sediment geochemistry (δ13C, C:N and parameters measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis) as sea-level indicators in Eurasian sub-Arctic salt marshes. At three salt marshes (<15 km apart) in Dvina Bay (White Sea, Russia), we collected...
Article
We present a Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) database for the Caribbean region (5°N to 25°N and 55°W to 90°W) that consists of 499 sea-level index points and 238 limiting dates. The database was compiled from multiple sea-level indicators (mangrove peat, microbial mats, beach rock and acroporid and massive corals). We subdivided the database into...
Article
Full-text available
Tidal range is one factor in determining the vertical location of local mean sea level, and it is also a contributor to total water levels and coastal flooding. It is therefore important to understand both the spatial distribution of tidal range and the temporal variation in tidal range, over a wide range of scales. Knowledge of historic tidal rang...
Article
Small-scale hydropower systems are popular both in the United States and much of the developing world due to the emphasis on renewable energy and the general cost-competitiveness of hydroelectric power generation. We present a novel modeling package, referred to as the Hydropower Potential Assessment Tool (HPAT), to assess historic and projected fu...
Article
Full-text available
Making meaningful projections of the impacts that possible future climates would have on water resources in mountain regions requires understanding how cryosphere hydrology model performance changes under altered climate conditions and when the model is applied to ungaged catchments. Further, if we are to develop better models, we must understand w...
Poster
Analysis of Gravity Recovery Data to determine the trends of terrestrial water mass in Indus Watershed over 10 years of time
Article
Full-text available
A comprehensive study of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) drainage basin was carried out to improve understanding of the coastal freshwater discharge (FWD) and glacier volume loss (GVL). Hydrologic processes during the period 1980-2014 were modeled using a suite of physically based, spatially distributed weather, energy-balance snow/ice melt, soil water ba...
Article
Full-text available
Robustly understanding connections between the climate, cryosphere, and streamflow is necessary to make informed decisions regarding water resources in mountainous regions. Conceptual models, for instance variations on simple degree-index (SDI) or enhanced temperature index (ETI) formulations of cryosphere heat transfer and melt, are often applied...
Article
Full-text available
The December 2007 storm, otherwise known as the Great Coastal Gale of 2007, was a series of extratropical cyclones that brought highly unprecedented wind speeds and precipitation to the Oregon and Washington coasts of the United States. A storm hindcast using the coupled Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) and Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) models was...
Chapter
Numerical tidal models are used to gain information about tides in the present, past, and future. However, modeling strategies are highly dependent on the spatial extent and type of information sought. Physical and numerical issues related to both global and regional tidal modeling are reviewed, including fundamental dynamics, forcing and damping,...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter presents a protocol for synthesizing sea-level data by means of a comprehensive database. A rigorous, objective error assessment assures that all conceivable sources of uncertainty are accounted for, thereby allowing direct comparison of data from different regions and environments. New developments in the methodology presented here in...
Article
A study of the freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) has been carried out. Using available streamgage data, regression equations were developed for monthly flows. These equations express discharge as a function of basin physical characteristics such as area, mean elevation, and land cover, and of basin meteorological characteristics su...
Article
Total water levels (TWLs) within estuaries are influenced by tides, wind, offshore waves and streamflow, all of which are uniquely affected by climate change. The magnitude of TWL associated with various return periods is relevant to understanding how the hydrodynamics of a bay or estuary may evolve under distinct climate scenarios. A methodology f...
Article
Full-text available
Monthly total precipitation and mean temperature climate surfaces, gridded to 30-arcseconds (≈1 km at the equator) and available for all global land areas, are presented. These datasets are generated with a Delta downscaling method, using the 30-arcsecond WorldClim climatologies to scale monthly anomaly grids. For monthly mean temperature, the anom...
Article
Full-text available
To better understand the effects of river flow and tidal stage on the propagation of realistic tsunami waves up large rivers, simulations of the Columbia River (United States) were carried out. The two-dimensional depth-averaged version of the advanced circulation model was used. The model was forced with open boundary tides, tidal potential, and r...
Article
Full-text available
A simple theoretical model is presented in order to predict the recirculation velocity in river embayments, also commonly referred to as eddies, gyres, cavities, and dead zones. This velocity is important as it sets the fundamental timescale of the motion in these ecologically important regions. Using only an equilibrium torque balance, basic geome...
Article
Full-text available
We present a high-resolution Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mascon solution for Gulf of Alaska (GOA) glaciers and compare this with in situ glaciological, climate and other remote-sensing observations. Our GRACE solution yields a GOA glacier mass balance of –65 AE AE 11 Gt a –1 for the period December 2003 to December 2010, with su...
Article
Full-text available
Areas with high species richness have become focal points in the establishment of marine protected areas, but an understanding of the factors that support this diversity is still incomplete. In coastal areas, tidal currents—modulated by bathymetry and manifested in variable speeds—are a dominant physical feature of the environment. However, difficu...
Article
We investigated the effect of tidal‐range change and sediment compaction on reconstructions of Holocene relative sea level (RSL) in New Jersey, USA. We updated a published sea‐level database to generate 50 sea‐level index points and ten limiting dates that define continuously rising RSL in New Jersey during the Holocene. There is scatter among the...
Article
Full-text available
Tides in the Delaware Bay (USA) have been modeled from 7000 years before present (7 ka) to the present day and for selected future sea-level rise scenarios (100 years, 300 years). Historic bathymetries were constructed through use of glacial isostatic adjustment models and a very high spatial resolution (< 100 m) was used at the shoreline. Future b...
Conference Paper
A hydrologic model for basins draining through Pakistan is developed with the specific intent of identifying microhydro sites and assessing their quality. The model outputs runoff which is used to estimate flow rate through each geographic cell. These flow rates are scaled by topographic slope using a relationship for potential power to approximate...
Article
Full-text available
Alaska is vast geographically, is located at high latitudes, is surrounded on three sides by oceans and has complex topography, encompassing several climate regions. While climate zones exist, there has not been an objective analysis to identify regions of homogeneous climate. In this study we use cluster analysis on a robust set of weather observa...
Article
Full-text available
Tidal constituents and datums are computed on a high resolution grid of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. A global model is used to determine tidal parameters on a grid with a nominal resolution of 800 × 800. The global model includes self-attraction and loading, drag in shallow marginal seas, and...
Conference Paper
Mass variations of glaciers in Alaska/northwestern Canada must be quantified in order to assess impacts on ecosystems, human infrastructure, and global sea level. Here we combine Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations with a wide range of satellite and field data to investigate drivers of these recent changes, with a focus on...
Article
The interpretation of present-day sea-level change, as well as the prediction of future relative sea-level (RSL) rise and its spatial variability, depend increasingly on the ability of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models to reveal non-eustatic components of RSL change. GIA results from the redistribution of mass due to the growth and decay of...
Article
Full-text available
This paper develops an analytical two-part covariance kernel from velocity correlations across a two-dimensional (vertical and flow directions) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) flow field. This will form the basis of a model of wave action in flood water that includes the underlying turbulence velocity field using Karhunen–Loéve (KL) expansion. The...
Article
The physical and structural characteristics of instream wood were examined within five streams that represented 200years of stream development following glacial recession within Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska. Wood characteristics altered with watershed age as terrestrial succession progressed and wood was recruited into the riverine environment...
Article
The measurement of water wave characteristics, such as wavelength and wave height, in the surf zone is important for monitoring, prediction of erosion, and numerical model calibration. Traditional methods of measuring wave heights have either been limited to a small number of points or have required contact with the water. An experimental study of...
Article
Full-text available
In order to design marine protected areas that are ecologically meaningful, it would be useful to improve our understanding of headland wake foraging systems, which are commonly exploited by baleen whales and other mobile marine predators. We used humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae sighting data from 1997 to 2008 in combination with tidal predic...
Article
Changes in species assemblages of intertidal foraminifera can be used to estimate the amount of earthquake-related subsidence during plate-boundary earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone. The accuracy and precision of foraminiferal methods in paleoenvironmental reconstruction is underpinned by the relations between contemporary taxa and their...
Article
Full-text available
The natural accumulation of logs, branches and other woody vegetation into the stream environment (coarse woody debris (CWD) accumulations) from adjacent stream banks plays an important role in altering the physical and ecological behaviour of rivers. CWD is often used as a tool in restoration projects to create or enhance instream habitat for biot...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes a video uploaded to the APS DFD Annual Meeting 2009 Gallery of Fluid Motion. The video contains both animations and still images from a three-dimensional volumetric velocimetry measurement set acquired in the flow around a Rushton turbine. Comment: Description of a fluid dynamics video uploaded for the APS DFD Annual Meeting...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional methods of measuring the profile of a scour hole or bed form have poor temporal resolution and may require the temporary cessation of the flow in order to be executed. These are undesirable characteristics since many hydraulic flows have unsteady water-sediment interfaces that can display considerable differences between their "dynamic"...