David Hemprich-Bennett

David Hemprich-Bennett
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Zoology

PhD in Molecular Ecology

About

14
Publications
2,472
Reads
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79
Citations
Introduction
I'm a Postdoc at the University of Oxford interested in using DNA metabarcoding to answer questions in applied ecology, especially those related to conservation and/or human health. Most of my research to date has been studying ecological interactions, especially how these interactions are altered by anthropogenic habitat modification. Predator-prey interactions have been the main focus, often in bats. My current role focuses on the ecology of the malarial mosquito species Anopheles gambiae.
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
University of Oxford
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Researching the network ecology of the malarial vector species Anopholes gambiae using DNA metabarcoding.
Education
September 2014 - September 2018
September 2012 - September 2013
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2008 - May 2012
University of Plymouth
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Variation in the diet of generalist insectivores can be affected by site-specific traits including weather, habitat, and season, as well as demographic traits such as reproductive status and age. We used molecular methods to compare diets of three distinct New Zealand populations of lesser short-tailed bats, Mystacina tuberculata. Summer diets were...
Article
Full-text available
Logging and habitat fragmentation impact tropical forest ecosystems in numerous ways, perhaps the most striking of which is by altering the temperature, humidity, and light environment of the forest—its microclimate. Because local-scale microclimatic conditions directly influence the physiology, demography and behavior of most species, many of the...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological variation between individuals can increase niche segregation and decrease intraspecific competition when heterogeneous individuals explore their environment in different ways. Among bat species, wing shape correlates with flight maneuverability and habitat use, with species that possess broader wings typically foraging in more clutter...
Article
Full-text available
Constructing ecological networks has become an indispensable approach in understanding how different taxa interact. However, the methods used to generate data in network research varies widely among studies, potentially limiting our ability to compare results meaningfully. In particular, methods of classifying nodes vary in their precision, likely...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat degradation is pervasive across the tropics and is particularly acute in Southeast Asia, with major implications for biodiversity. Much research has addressed the impact of degradation on species diversity; however, little is known about how ecological interactions are altered, including those that constitute important ecosystem functions s...
Article
Full-text available
Dietary metabarcoding has vastly improved our ability to analyse the diets of animals, but it is hampered by a plethora of technical limitations including potentially reduced data output due to the disproportionate amplification of the DNA of the focal predator, here termed ‘the predator problem’. We review the various methods commonly used to over...
Preprint
Full-text available
Dietary metabarcoding has vastly improved our ability to analyse the diets of animals, but it is hampered by a plethora of technical limitations including potentially reduced data output due to the disproportionate amplification of the DNA of the focal predator, here termed ‘the predator problem’. We review the various methods commonly used to over...
Article
Full-text available
Logging activities degrade forest habitats across large areas of the tropics, but the impacts on trophic interactions that underpin forest ecosystems are poorly understood. DNA metabarcoding provides an invaluable tool to investigate such interactions, allowing analysis at a far greater scale and resolution than has previously been possible. We ana...
Article
Full-text available
Baited pitfall traps (BPTs) and flight intercept traps (FITs) are the most common methods employed for sampling dung beetle communities. These methods vary in their efficacy and are affected by factors such as the bait types used and the dispersal abilities of different dung beetle species. We present the first quantitative comparison of the commun...
Article
Full-text available
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Preprint
Full-text available
Logging activities degrade forest habitats across large areas of the tropics, but the impacts on trophic interactions that underpin forest ecosystems are poorly understood. DNA metabarcoding provides an invaluable tool to investigate such interactions, allowing analysis at a far greater scale and resolution than has previously been possible. We ana...
Preprint
Full-text available
Agricultural expansion across the tropics is the primary driver of biodiversity declines and ecosystem service degradation. However, efforts to mitigate these negative impacts may reduce commodity production. We quantify trade-offs between oil palm cultivation and ecological outcomes (biodiversity, above-ground carbon storage and dung nutrient cycl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Habitat degradation is pervasive across the tropics and is particularly acute in Southeast Asia, with major implications for biodiversity. Much research has addressed the impact of degradation on species diversity; however, little is known about how ecological interactions are altered, including those that constitute important ecosystem functions s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Constructing networks has become an indispensable approach in understanding how different taxa interact. However, methodologies vary widely among studies, potentially limiting our ability to meaningfully compare results. In particular, how network architecture is influenced by the extent to which nodes are resolved to either taxa or taxonomic units...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Using DNA metabarcoding to assess the effects of various environmental impacts on bat-arthropod systems.