David A. Harrison

David A. Harrison
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Department of Management

Ph.D.

About

119
Publications
185,798
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26,660
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2010 - present
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Prothro Chair of Business Administration

Publications

Publications (119)
Chapter
Immigrants are important contributors to workplaces, but HRM scholars have only recently begun to study them systematically. We document the prevalence and cross-national variation in populations of immigrant employees. Going beyond a treatment that considers them as another element of diversity, we propose how gradients of status at each level of...
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In recent years, research from various disciplines, including social psychology, sociology, economics, gender studies, and organizational behavior, has illuminated the importance of considering the various ways in which multiple social categories intersect to shape outcomes for women in the workplace. However, these findings are scattered across di...
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Immigrants have become an important source of talent as well as a flash point for conflict in many countries. Alongside established streams of research on immigrants in other disciplines, we hope to galvanize interest among management scholars, particularly about immigrant employees. We begin by observing the identity and status changes undergone b...
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Perspective taking and empathic concern (empathy) have each been proposed as constructive approaches to social relationships. However, their potential distinctions, limitations, and consequences in task contexts are not well understood. We meta-analytically examined 304 independent samples to uncover unique effects of perspective taking and empathi...
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Entrepreneurial alertness can play a vital role in the identification and creation of opportunities involving early-stage ventures. However, the strategic function of entrepreneurial alertness in more mature organizations has not been explored. In a field study of organizations responding to an environmental disruption, we explore if entrepreneuria...
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We conduct a comprehensive synthesis of the research on how female representation in the upper echelons (i.e., top management teams and CEO positions) might affect firm performance. To help resolve longstanding theoretical, empirical, and substantive debates, we present an integrative conceptual framework based on the overarching concepts of unique...
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We review the practice of building new psychological constructs by combining older constructs (a process we refer to as construct mixology), with a focus on the impact, methodology, and substantive knowledge implications of this practice. Our review suggests that some of the most influential micro-level constructs in the field of management are eit...
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We proposed and investigated the complex roles of higher order personality dimensions and health-related strains in relation to expatriate adjustment and performance using comparable cross-sectional (n = 170) and longitudinal (n = 77) samples of software engineers posted from India to North America, Western Europe and East Asia. Results indicate th...
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We examine changes in work adjustment among 179 expatriates from 3 multinational organizations from predeparture through the first 9 months of a new international assignment. Our 10-wave results challenge classic U-shaped theories of expatriate adjustment (e.g., Torbiorn, 1982). Consistent with uncertainty reduction theory, our results instead sugg...
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The authors investigate the employee features that, alongside overall voice expression, affect supervisors' voice recognition. Drawing primarily from status characteristics and network position theories, the authors propose and find in a study of 693 employees from 89 different credit union units that supervisors are more likely to credit those rep...
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We examine the complex effects of faultlines and network ties on team performance. By using panel data from 672 individuals in 148 research teams at a major U.S. university, we find that informal networks serve as triggers and dampeners of faultline effects. Team performance improved when friendship ties bridged the subgroups that were cleaved by e...
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Most theory and evidence about firm adaptation to major environmental change focuses on the “what” and how of strategic choices: activities, structures, and transactions with their environments. Far less research is devoted to the “when” or intended timing of those strategies: specifically, adaptive responses that seek to regain temporal fit with t...
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Social network theories have increasingly found their application in examining individual, group and organizational level outcomes. However, we argue that in the absence of a clear typology of network ties that accounts for various relational content between individuals, organizational scholars have not been able to synthesize the cumulative findin...
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How does the impact of female representation in strategic leadership positions (top management teams, boards of directors, CEO positions) affect firm performance? Despite research efforts spanning several decades, the answer to this basic question is still elusive, not least due to the inconsistencies in findings reported in the literature, which i...
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Despite their widespread adoption, concerns remain that virtual work arrangements can harm employee job performance and citizenship behavior. Does telecommuting really hamper these critical dimensions of employee effectiveness? To answer this question, we develop a theoretical framework linking telecommuting to task and contextual performance via a...
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Interdependence among team members is critical for transactive memory system (TMS) development. When members perceive that they are interdependent, they are likely to cooperate with one another by sharing their expertise. However, research suggests that members may not always perceive their goals to be aligned with those of others. What are implica...
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In two studies, we develop and test theory about the relationship between speaking up, one type of organizational citizenship behavior, and unit performance by accounting for where employee voice is flowing. Results from a qualitative study of managers and professionals across a variety of industries suggest that voice to targets at different forma...
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Temporal individual differences are an under-explored, but research-worthy form of diversity in teams. Although persistent differences in how members think about and value time can profoundly influence team performance, the compositional impact of time-based individual differences is regularly overlooked. Optimal or suboptimal team performance can...
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Even when shocks in a firm's environment are predictable, their consequences are not. Using the relocation of the Dallas Cowboys Stadium as a rich case of such a disruption, we investigate how combinations of strategic interpretation and spatial distance influence incumbent business owners' decisions to pursue temporal adaptation as a response. Tem...
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The dominant perspective on expatriation characterizes the process as a continuing adaptation to existing job demands on an international assignment. Another, less studied perspective, emphasizes that expatriates can initiate tactics to acquire task, interpersonal, and affective resources for shaping their assignment experiences. Adopting a positiv...
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We draw on identity theory to explain why employees returning from international assignments may leave their organizations. We tested our predictions over a 12-month period with a sample of 112 repatriated employees from a broad cross-section of firms. Prior job embeddedness during expatriation positively relates to the strength of an individual's...
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When leaders interact in teams with their subordinates, they build social capital that can have positive effects on team performance. Does this social capital affect team performance because subordinates come to see the leader as charismatic? We answered this question by examining 2 models. First, we tested the charisma-to-centrality model accordin...
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Despite a massive empirical effort, there has been no consensus on appropriate solutions to lateness, absence, or withdrawal problems (Johns, 1997). A vigorous debate about the meaning and measurement of these behaviors has continued for decades (Blau, 1998; Hanisch & Hulin, 1990, Hanisch & Hulin, 1991; Hanisch, Hulin, & Roznowski, 1998; Harrison &...
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As corporate scandals proliferate, practitioners and researchers alike need a cumulative, quantitative understanding of the antecedents associated with unethical decisions in organizations. In this meta-analysis, the authors draw from over 30 years of research and multiple literatures to examine individual ("bad apple"), moral issue ("bad case"), a...
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The authors propose that broad aspects of lateral relationships, conceptualized as coworker support and coworker antagonism, are linked to important individual employee outcomes (role perceptions, work attitudes, withdrawal, and effectiveness) in a framework that synthesizes several theoretical predictions. From meta-analytic tests based on 161 ind...
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What are the positive and negative consequences of telecommuting? How do these consequences come about? When are these consequences more or less potent? The authors answer these questions through construction of a theoretical framework and meta-analysis of 46 studies in natural settings involving 12,883 employees. Telecommuting had small but mainly...
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The article is a response to the article “Making the Difference: Applying a Logic of Diversity,” by Scott Page in this issue of the journal. The authors focus their critique on the simplicity of Page's arguments and frameworks, contending that the reality of the workplace is not so simply organized. The authors also critique Page for a too narrow c...
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Research on organizational diversity, heterogeneity, and related concepts has prolif- erated in the past decade, but few consistent findings have emerged. We argue that the construct of diversity requires closer examination. We describe three distinctive types of diversity: separation, variety, and disparity. Failure to recognize the meaning, maxim...
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The article examines business ethics by using a meta-analysis approach. It is suggested that a clearer understanding of the individual, situational and environmental factors that impact individual-level unethical choices is established by bringing together emperical research on ethical decision making from multiple resources and disparate literatur...
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We compared the speed and quality of performance for familiar, initially unfamiliar but continuing, and one-shot (single session) teams. We also proposed and observed entrainment effects for task time limits. Over the course of weekly sessions with changing tasks, continuing teams reached speed levels of the initially familiar teams, but the one-sh...
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Hypotheses are proposed about relations among “building block” components of the motivation to attain exercise goals in an organizational fitness program, as well as about health-related individual differences in those components. The hypotheses are tested in a longitudinal field study involving questionnaire, physiological, and behavioral data fro...
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Social loafing was observed as a naturally occurring process in project teams of students working together for 3-4 months. The authors assessed the contributions that member composition (i.e., relational dissimilarity and knowledge, skills, and abilities; KSAs), perceptions of the team's interaction processes (i.e., dispensability and the fairness...
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Affirmative action programs (AAPs) are controversial employment policies in the United States and elsewhere. A large body of evidence about attitudinal reactions to AAPs in employment has accumulated over 35 years: at least 126 independent samples involving 29,000 people. However, findings are not firmly established or integrated. In the current ar...
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What knowledge do we have about the reliable positive and negative consequences of telecommuting? How do these consequences come about? What actions can we recommend based on research evidence? We answer these questions through a meta-analysis of 38 studies involving 10711 employees working in natural contexts. Telecommuting has small but favorable...
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Drawing on the compatibility principle in attitude theory, we propose that overall job attitude (job satisfaction and organizational commitment) provides increasingly powerful prediction of more integrative behavioral criteria (focal performance, contextual performance, lateness, absence, and turnover combined). The principle was sustained by a com...
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How do members' and leaders' social network structures help or hinder team effectiveness? A meta-analysis of 37 studies of teams in natural contexts suggests that teams with densely configured interpersonal ties attain their goals better and are more committed to staying together; that is, team task performance and viability are both higher. Furthe...
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The authors report the collaborative efforts of 2 research teams that independently investigated the effects of stable personality traits (the Big Five) and specific behavioral competencies (cultural flexibility, task and people orientations, and ethnocentrism) on key dimensions of expatriate effectiveness: psychological adjustment, assignment with...
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The authors developed hypotheses about the effectiveness of response rate techniques for organizational researchers surveying executives. Using meta-analytic procedures to test those hypotheses, the authors analyzed response rate data from 231 studies that surveyed executives and appeared in top management journals from 1992 to 2003. They found mea...
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The paper presents an explicit consideration of the criterion space for expatriate success. Expatriate performance is conceptualized in terms of task completion, relationship building and overall performance. These three dimensions are determined by various features of effort regulation: the amount and pattern of personal resources the expatriate s...
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This study examines the adjustment of self-initiated foreign employees (SFEs). We consider the effects of proactive socialization tactics on expatriate adjustment, which we conceptualize in terms of organizational fit and community fit. We then examine turnover (intentions and actual) which is a potentially important outcome of (mis)fit for expatri...
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Leaders should be a key source of ethical guidance for employees. Yet, little empirical research focuses on an ethical dimension of leadership. We propose social learning theory as a theoretical basis for understanding ethical leadership and offer a constitutive definition of the ethical leadership construct. In seven interlocking studies, we inves...
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Integrating work on international assignments and domestic stress, we conducted meta-analyses of over 50 determinants and consequences of expatriate adjustment using data from 8,474 expatriates in 66 studies. We also examined the trajectory of adjustment over time, and time as a moderator of adjustment effects. Results emphasize the centrality, cri...
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With the recent spate of scandals resulting from the questionable behavior of corporate leaders, there have been calls for various governance mechanisms including ethics codes to guide executive decision-making. However, the extent to which ethics codes are actually used by executives when making strategic choices as opposed to being merely symboli...
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ABSTRACT The evolving legal environment surrounding intellectual property (IP) and its impact on information systems, especially involving electronic commerce, and the type of education and training provided by management information systems (MIS) faculty to MIS students is a relationship that has not been investigated. Although organizations are c...
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This article discusses a study that looks at the effects of social network structures of leaders and members on team effectiveness by studying how important leader advice is in facilitating team social integration and task completion. The article discusses the network density and node centrality aspects of social network structure as well as time a...
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Integrating work on international assignments and domestic stress, we conducted meta-analyses of over 50 determinants and consequences of expatriate adjustment using data from 8,474 expatriates in 66 studies. We also examined the trajectory of adjustment over time, and time as a moderator of adjustment effects. Results emphasize the centrality, cri...
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We review 25 years of research on expatriate experiences concentrating on expatriate adjustment as a central construct, and relying on a general stressor-stress-strain framework. First, we consider who expatriates are, why their experiences differ from domestic employees, and what adjustment is. Conceptualizing (mal)adjustment in terms of stress, w...
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We examine the merits of studying absence and attendance behaviors across multiple settings. In this approach, we connect consistent, between-person variance to dispositional influences and contextual, within-person variance to social influences. Using definitions of absence and lateness that focus on how these behaviors violate social expectations...
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Using a “combine and conquer” strategy with the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM), we applied a series of loosely to tightly integrated models to the IT adoption decisions of small business executives regarding a web site. With application of structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques, we found that there...
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Time serves as a medium for collaboration in teams, allowing members to exchange personal and task-related information. We propose that stronger team reward contingencies stimulate collaboration. As time passes, increasing collaboration weakens the effects of surface-level (demographic) diversity on team outcomes but strengthens those of deep-level...
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The inclusion of social subsystem costs and benefits in information technology (IT) investment choices has been a difficult problem for IT decision-makers. Past research has shown that although some organizations adequately and consistently consider social subsystem issues when making IT investment decisions, many do not. This demonstrates a discre...
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Obtaining primary data from executives is vital for answering many questions in management research, especially those about firm-level processes. Mailed surveys are the most popular method for doing so. We try to answer two questions about how executives respond to this form of data collection. First, what are the "normal" response rates to mailed...
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Firm-level data from executives are necessary for testing many theories in organizational science. To date, researchers who have used survey methods to get data from executives have relied on response-rate techniques that were validated in general public, customer-, or employee-level populations. In a factorial field experiment, we manipulated the...
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The authors developed and tested a model of spouse adjustment to international assignments in a sequence of qualitative and quantitative investigations. From in-depth interviews with expatriate spouses, half of whom had either positive or negative experiences living abroad, the authors identified several potentially important sources of adjustment....
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The authors developed and tested a model of spouse adjustment to international assignments in a sequence of qualitative and quantitative investigations. From in-depth interviews with expatriate spouses, half of whom had either positive or negative experiences living abroad, the authors identified several potentially important sources of adjustment....
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Using human capital theory, we develop hypotheses about the impact of perceived organizational support and two forms of work–family conflict on the psychological withdrawal of expatriates. We also consider the exacerbating effects of commitment to either domain. To test these hypotheses, we collected multisource data from 324 expatriates in 46 coun...
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A model of attitude toward affirmative action programs (AAPs) was applied in 4 studies involving 1,622 participants. In Study 1, attributes people tacitly associate with AAPs were identified by open-ended elicitation. Using those attributes, an instrument was developed and administered in Studies 2, 3, and 4. In those studies, a multiplicative comp...
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We conducted qualitative and quantitative reviews of the medical literature to develop an understanding of the linkages between nonspecific lower back pain (LBP) and employee absenteeism, and the efficacy of lower back pain interventions (LBPI) in reducing absenteeism. First, we offered a general time-based framework to clarify the causal flows bet...
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Conceptual data modeling has been defined as a complex task for designers. This study draws from educational and psychological research in examining the training of novices in conceptual data modeling. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to determine the effects of self-efficacy and cooperative, team-based participation on complex data modeli...
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We hypothesize that as time passes and allows for greater collaboration among team members,the negative effects of surface-level (demographic) diversity are weakened, but the negative effects of deep-level (psychological) diversity are strengthened. We also propose that perceived diversity mediates the impact of "actual" demographic and psychologic...
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We developed and tested hypotheses describing the psychological process invoked when managers receive requests for accommodations from employees with disabilities. In two scenario-based experiments, obligation and attitude had consistent effects on managers' intentions to comply, mediating the influence of performance instrumentality and perceived...
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Information technology (IT) investment decisions have traditionally focused on financial or technological issues. Responding to what appears to be a lack of payoff in IT investments, researchers as well as practitioners recently have suggested that traditional valuation analyses are incomplete and have called for additional work to identify "hidden...