David Hamilton

David Hamilton
Griffith University · Australian Rivers Institute

B.Sc., Ph.D.

About

395
Publications
134,023
Reads
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13,725
Citations
Citations since 2016
142 Research Items
9261 Citations
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Introduction
David Hamilton is the Interim Director in the Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane. His research interests are in lake water quality modelling, cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms and sensors for measuring lake parameters.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - March 2017
Environmental Research Institute, University of Waikato
Position
  • Professor
July 2002 - March 2017
The University of Waikato
Position
  • Chair
January 1993 - December 2002
University of Western Australia

Publications

Publications (395)
Article
Full-text available
Ammonium (NH 4-N) produces a paradoxical effect on submersed macrophytes because it is not only the preferred nitrogen source for the growth of plants but also threatens the growth of plants at high concentration. Whether short-term and small-scale physiological toxicity experiments at an individual level can reflect the effects of high ammonium on...
Article
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Understanding the spatiotemporal trend of land cover (LC) change and its impact on humans and the environment is essential for decision making and ecosystem conservation. Land degradation generally accelerates overland flow, reducing soil moisture and base flow recharge, and increasing sediment erosion and transport, thereby affecting the entire ba...
Article
Full-text available
Harmful algal blooms of the freshwater cyanobacteria genus Microcystis are a global problem and are expected to intensify with climate change. In studies of climate change impacts on Microcystis blooms, atmospheric stilling has not been considered. Stilling is expected to occur in some regions of the world with climate warming, and it will affect l...
Article
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David Schindler and his colleagues pioneered studies in the 1970s on the role of phosphorus in stimulating cyanobacterial blooms in North American lakes. Our understanding of the nuances of phosphorus utilization by cyanobacteria has evolved since that time. We review the phosphorus utilization strategies used by cyanobacteria, such as use of organ...
Article
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Nutrient enrichment of lakes from anthropogenic activities is a significant and increasing issue globally, impairing the health, biodiversity and service provisioning from lakes, with impacts on cultural, recreational, economic and aesthetic values. Internal nutrient loads from lakebed sediment releases are a primary cause of lake eutrophication an...
Article
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Background Aggregations of cyanobacteria in lakes and reservoirs are commonly associated with surface blooms, but may also occur in the metalimnion as subsurface or deep chlorophyll maxima. Metalimnetic cyanobacteria blooms are of great concern when potentially toxic species, such as Planktothrix rubescens, are involved. Metalimnetic blooms of P. r...
Article
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The recent rise of red tide harmful algal blooms has induced ecosystem degradation, economic losses, and aquaculture damage, yet little is known on prevention and mitigation of red tides. Actual control methods involve physical, chemical, and biological processes, with varying success. Here, we review physical, chemical, and biological control meth...
Article
High-frequency cyanobacteria monitoring often uses in-situ fluorescence of phycocyanin (f-PC). However, f-PC must be calibrated for the dominant cyanobacteria species, and it cannot distinguish cyanobacteria taxa, which relies on conventional time-consuming cyanobacteria identification methods. This study proposes a framework to automate f-PC speci...
Article
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Green Lake is the deepest natural inland lake in Wisconsin, with a maximum depth of about 72 meters. In the early 1900s, the lake was believed to have very good water quality (low nutrient concentrations and good water clarity) with low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations occurring in only the deepest part of the lake. Because of increased phospho...
Article
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Loss of submerged macrophytes resulting from high turbidity has become a global environmental problem in shallow lakes, associated with eutrophication. To help macrophyte recovery, application of artificial light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been proposed to complement nutrient load reductions. We set up a mesocosm experiment to test if LEDs could co...
Article
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The objective of this study was to identify correlations between environmental variables and cyanobacterial diversity, succession and dominance in three Australian water supply reservoirs. We assessed up to 15 years of in-lake water quality monitoring data from Lake Wivenhoe and Lake Tingalpa (Queensland), and Lake Myponga (South Australia). Lakes...
Article
Gully erosion is a significant environmental concern globally. It reduces agricultural productivity, damages urban and rural infrastructure, degrades the quality of receiving waters, and can cause loss of life. In this review we synthesise contemporary models for the erosion of classical gullies An overview of erosion processes provides a context f...
Article
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Cyanobacteria harmful blooms can represent a major risk for public health due to potential release of toxins and other noxious compounds in the water. A continuous and high-resolution monitoring of the cyanobacteria population is required due to their rapid dynamics, which has been increasingly done using in-situ fluorescence of phycocyanin (f-PC)...
Article
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Numerical models of lakes and reservoirs have been widely applied to provide quantitative forecasts of pathogen occurrence and persistence in source water to inform quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). There is an emerging need in the water supply industry for a set of best practice modelling guidelines, supporting consistent and repeatab...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Gully erosion is a significant safety, economic, and environmental issue which affects agricultural productivity, infrastructure stability, and water quality of receiving waters. Hot spots of gully erosion have been identified across every continent and control and mitigation methods are sought. Despite a variety of interventions available to preve...
Article
Nitrogen (N) from anthropogenic sources has been identified as a major pollutant of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. We developed a conceptual framework to synthesise and visualise the fate and transport of N from the catchments to the sea from a literature review. The framework was created to fit managers and policymakers' requirements to...
Article
Urban lakes are important natural assets but are exposed to multiple stressors from human activities. Submersed macrophytes, a key plant group that helps to maintain clear-water conditions in lakes, tend to be scarce in urban lakes, particularly when they are eutrophic or hypertrophic, and their loss is linked, in part, to impaired underwater light...
Article
Lakes and their catchments have been subjected to centuries to millennia of exploitation by humans. Efficient monitoring methods are required to promote proactive protection and management. Traditional monitoring is time consuming and expensive, which limits the number of lakes monitored. Lake surface sediments provide a temporally integrated repre...
Article
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China has made a concerted effort to successfully improve water quality of rivers, but lake water quality has not improved. Lakes require controls on both catchment external nutrient loads and in-lake internal loads, where nature-based solutions are coupled with engineered systems to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
Article
Agriculture is a major contributor to marine nitrogen pollution, and treatment wetlands can be a strategy to reduce it. However, few studies have assessed the potential of treatment wetlands to mitigate nitrogen pollution in tropical regions. We quantify the nitrogen removal rates of four recently constructed treatment wetlands in tropical Australi...
Article
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Estuaries host unique biodiversity and deliver a range of ecosystem services at the interface between catchment and the ocean. They are also among the most degraded ecosystems on Earth. Freshwater flow regimes drive ecological processes contributing to their biodiversity and economic value, but have been modified extensively in many systems by upst...
Article
Full-text available
Loss of submerged macrophytes resulting from high turbidity has become a global environmental problem in shallow lakes, associated with eutrophication. To help macrophyte recovery, application of artificial light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been proposed to complement nutrient load reductions. We set up a mesocosm experiment to test if LEDs could co...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have led to long-term changes in the thermal structure, including surface temperatures, deepwater temperatures, and vertical thermal gradients, in many lakes around the world. Though many studies highlight warming of surface water temperatures in lakes worldwide, less is known about long-term trends...
Article
Global warming and eutrophication contribute to the worldwide increase in cyanobacterial blooms, and the level of cyanobacterial biomass is strongly associated with rises in methane emissions from surface lake waters. Hence, methane metabolizing microorganisms may be important for modulating carbon flow in cyanobacterial blooms. Here, we surveyed m...
Article
Microcystis is a bloom-forming genus of cyanobacteria with some genotypes that produce highly toxic microcystin hepatotoxins. In waterbodies where biological and physical factors are relatively homogenous, toxin quotas (the average amount of toxin per cell), at a single point in time, are expected to be relatively constant. In this study we challen...
Article
Globally, anthropogenic actions of land use change and intensification and deliberate or unintentional species invasions have adversely affected lakes, resulting in widespread loss of benefits to society. In recognition of these impacts, restoration efforts have increased in recent years. Restoration is a challenging and expensive process, however,...
Article
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Lakes and reservoirs throughout the world are increasingly adversely affected by cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs). The development and spatiotemporal distributions of blooms are governed by complex physical mixing and transport processes that interact with physiological processes affecting the growth and loss of bloom-forming species...
Article
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Wetlands play a key role in regulating global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions but anthropogenic impacts on nutrients may severely alter this balance. Recent assessments indicate that almost 22% of the global wetland area may be affected by agricultural runoff. In this work, we developed and applied a dynamic mechanistic reaction network model of soi...
Article
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Optical sensors for fluorescence of chlorophyll a (f-Chl a) and phycocyanin (f-PC) are increasingly used as a proxy for biomass of algae and cyanobacteria, respectively. They provide measurements at high-frequency and modest cost. These sensors require site-specific calibration due to a range of interferences. Light intensity affects the fluorescen...
Article
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Australian ecosystems, particularly wetlands, are facing new and extreme threats due to climate change, land use, and other human interventions. However, more fundamental knowledge is required to understand how nutrient turnover in wetlands is affected. In this study, we deployed a mechanistic biogeochemical model of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and s...
Article
Shallow lake ecosystems are widely impaired by eutrophication. Lake restoration projects frequently fail or are only partially successful, reflecting that environmental managers face difficult challenges in addressing this complex problem. Key uncertainties relate to selecting appropriate methods and predicting the resulting response trajectory, th...
Article
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Climate change is expected to significantly alter river hydrological regimes throughout the world, affecting water resources and the frequency of floods and droughts. The objectives of this study were to determine the impacts of climate change and sea level rise on streamflow and floodplain inundation in the subtropical Logan-Albert catchment, Aust...
Article
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Globally, lake surface water temperatures have warmed rapidly relative to air temperature, but changes in deepwater temperatures and vertical thermal structure are still largely unknown. We have compiled the most comprehensive data set to date of long-term (1970-2009) summertime vertical temperature profiles in lakes across the world to examine tre...
Article
The Logan-Albert estuary in southeast Queensland, Australia, has high biodiversity and supports multiple economic and recreational services. Elevated nutrient and sediment loads have been a longstanding management issue for the estuary. We investigated the spatial and seasonal patterns of nutrients and turbidity along the Logan-Albert estuary and a...
Article
Lakes are 'hotspots' for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, primarily carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4). Understanding the processes regulating GHG emissions from lakes, and their temporal variability, is essential for more accurately quantifying the role of lakes in global GHG cycles. In this study, we identified the processes that affect CO 2...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper provides estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from a eutrophic monomictic New Zealand lake, Okaro. Monthly monitoring of dissolved CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the lake is used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions at annual time scales. The combination of field research and process-based mathematical modelling in this manuscript provid...
Article
Lakes are ‘hotspots’ for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, primarily carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Understanding the processes regulating GHG emissions from lakes, and their temporal variability, is essential for more accurately quantifying the role of lakes in global GHG cycles. In this study, we identified the processes that affect CO2 an...
Article
Several cyanobacteria, including diazotrophic Raphidiopsis raciborskii, can form harmful blooms when dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations are very low. We hypothesized that R. raciborskii strains would vary in P allocations to cell growth and storage, providing resilience of populations to continuously low or variable P supplies. We...
Article
Full-text available
Cyanobacteria harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) in lakes and reservoirs represent a major risk for water authorities globally due to their toxicity and economic impacts. Anticipating bloom occurrence and understanding the main drivers of CyanoHABs are needed to optimize water resources management. An extensive review of the application of CyanoHABs foreca...
Article
Knowledge of trophic status is fundamental to understanding the condition and function of lake ecosystems. We developed regression models to predict chlorophyll a concentrations (chl a) in New Zealand lakes for reference and current states, based on an existing dataset of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations for 1031 lakes....
Article
Predicting algal population dynamics using models informed by experimental data has been used as a strategy to inform the management and control of harmful cyanobacterial blooms. We selected toxic bloom-forming species Microcystis spp. and Raphidiopsis raciborskii (basionym Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii) for further examination as they dominate in...
Article
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Understanding topography effects on soil properties is vital to modelling landscape hydrology and establishing sustainable on-field management practices. This research focuses on an arable area (117 km2) in Southwestern Ethiopia where agricultural fields and bush cover are the dominant land uses. We postulate that adapting either of the soil data r...
Article
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Bacteria play key roles in the function and diversity of aquatic systems, but aside from study of specific bloom systems, little is known about the diversity or biogeography of bacteria associated with harmful cyanobacterial blooms (cyanoHABs). CyanoHAB species are known to shape bacterial community composition and to rely on functions provided by...
Article
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Chlorophyll a (Chl-a) is an important indicator of algal biomass in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, monthly monitoring data for Chl-a concentration were collected between 2005 and 2015 at four stations in Meiliang Bay, a eutrophic bay in Lake Taihu, China. The spatiotemporal distribution of Chl-a in the bay was investigated, and a statistical mo...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands can increase resilience to extreme climatic events and have a key role in protection and water quality improvement in coastal ecosystems. Studies in tropical coastal wetlands at a catchment scale are scarce, and most work has been undertaken on small, temperate wetlands. In this study, we tested whether natural coastal wetlands in a tropic...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Submerged plants make an important contribution to nitrogen cycling in lakes including in the rhizosphere microenvironment through microbial activities. The main objective of this study was to investigate the abundance of functional genes for nitrogen cycling and the ecological relationship between these genes in the rhizosphere sediment of...
Article
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The formation of ice cover on lakes alters heat and energy transfer with the water column. The fraction of surface area covered by ice and the timing of ice‐on and ice‐off therefore affects hydrodynamics and the seasonal development of stratification and related ecosystem processes. Multi‐year model simulations of temperate lake ecosystems that fre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cyanobacteria blooms can be a threat to human health. Drastic changes in cyanobacteria concentrations are often rapid; thus high frequency sampling is required for effective bloom detection and control. Traditional monitoring methods are unsuited to such analysis and can be onerous. On the other hand, in-situ fluorescence probes are currently emplo...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical and subtropical regions can be particularly severely affected by flooding. Climate change is expected to lead to more intense precipitation in many regions of the world, increasing the frequency and magnitude of flood events. This paper presents a review of studies assessing the impacts of climate change on riverine flooding in the world's...
Article
Quantifying environmental changes relative to ecosystem reference conditions (baseline or natural states) can inform assessment of anthropogenic impacts and the development of restoration objectives and targets. We developed statistical models to predict current and reference concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in surfac...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding of colony specific properties of cyanobacteria in the natural environment has been challenging because sampling methods disaggregate colonies and there are often delays before they can be isolated and preserved. Microcystis is a ubiquitous cyanobacteria that forms large colonies in situ and often produces microcystins, a potent hepato...
Article
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In recent years, in-situ fluorometers have been extensively deployed to monitor cyanobacteria in near real-time. Acceptable accuracy can be achieved between measured pigments and cyanobacteria biovolume provided the cyanobacteria species are known. However, cellular photosynthetic pigment content and measurement interferences are site and species s...
Article
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Cyanobacterial blooms pose health risks to recreational water users. In New Zealand, cyanobacteria biovolumes are used to assess risk, but analyses can be time-consuming and costly. In this study, measurements from a handheld phycocyanin sensor (Cyclops-7, Turner Designs, USA) were compared with biovolumes from five lakes and a river in the Rotorua...
Article
Harmful cyanobacterial blooms (=cyanoHABs) are an increasing feature of many waterbodies throughout the world. Many bloom-forming species produce toxins, making them of particular concern for drinking water supplies, recreation and fisheries in waterbodies along the freshwater to marine continuum. Global changes resulting from human impacts, such a...
Article
This study examined long-term stability in water quality of Lake Okataina, North Island, New Zealand, inferred from sediments deposited from 1836 to 2009, during which time there was a pyroclastic volcanic eruption (Tarawera 1886) and successive introductions of invasive mammals. Multiple geochemical proxies were analysed stratigraphically for orga...
Article
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The General Lake Model (GLM) is a one-dimensional open-source code designed to simulate the hydrodynamics of lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands. GLM was developed to support the science needs of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), a network of researchers using sensors to understand lake functioning and address questions about how...
Article
Phosphorus (P) is a key driver of phytoplankton growth in lentic systems. During summer-stratified periods when dissolved inorganic P (DIP) is low, the phytoplankton assemblage often has elevated P uptake rates. Under these conditions, dissolved organic P (DOP) can become an important source of P for phytoplankton and a driver of phytoplankton succ...
Article
Full-text available
Dissolved reactive phosphorous (DRP) in lake systems is conventionally considered to predominate over other dissolved P species, however, this view neglects an important set of interactions that occurs between P and reactive iron hydroxide surfaces. This study addresses the coupling of P with dispersed iron nanoparticles in lakes, an interaction th...
Article
A significant challenge in resource management is addressed: the perceived trade-off between economic growth and ecosystem restoration and conservation. Traditional approaches to management regard restoration as a potential cost to economic productivity. In this study we show that by considering a broader range of economic values, including ecosyst...