David Gordon

David Gordon
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Politics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

25
Publications
5,574
Reads
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636
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
University of Toronto
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2016 - present
Earth Systems Governance Network
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Research Fellows are early to mid-level career scientists who seek to link their own research projects with the broader themes and questions of earth system governance.
July 2014 - April 2016
University of Manitoba
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Taught Introduction to Comparative Politics and Introduction to International Relations at the University of Manitoba, Department of Political Studies
Education
August 2008 - June 2016
University of Toronto
Field of study
  • Political Science
August 2006 - June 2008
University of Manitoba
Field of study
  • Political Studies

Publications

Publications (25)
Book
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Environmental Policy, Economics and Law - Cities on the World Stage - by David J. Gordon ***** Print: https://tinyurl.com/y7t3lo57 ******* eBook: https://tinyurl.com/y8bqq4lw ******* ## Cities, and the transnational city-networks in which they participate, are increasingly acknowledged as leaders in the global response to climate...
Article
Cities both large and small, more and less economically advanced, are deeply involved in efforts to address the most challenging and complex issues of contemporary global governance, ranging from climate change and conditions of insecurity to human migration and public health. Yet this puzzling phenomenon is largely ignored within International Rel...
Article
Full-text available
Cities have come to play an important role in the global governance of climate change, and are increasingly recognized as a crucial component of the post-Paris climate regime. Based in part on their jurisdictional authority, shared commitment to action and disdain for negotiations, there is considerable optimism that cities can meaningfully contrib...
Chapter
The increasing number and broadening functions of transnational city networks suggests a need to rethink prevailing conceptualizations of city networks. This chapter focuses on one under-theorized dimension of city network agency: the role and impact of city network secretariats (CNSs). It examines the sources of CNS authority and the conditions un...
Article
Full-text available
The synthesis provided by Davidson et al. offers a welcome contribution to the study of cities and city‐networks, providing an agenda and an analytical framework that may be used for understanding and addressing critical questions of political economy, knowledge dynamics and local/institutional dimensions of urban climate governance.
Book
Cambridge Core - Environmental Policy, Economics and Law - Urban Climate Politics - edited by Jeroen van der Heijden
Article
Non-state and subnational climate actors have become central to global climate change governance. Quantitatively assessing climate mitigation undertaken by these entities is critical to understand the credibility of this trend. In this Perspective, we make recommendations regarding five main areas of research and methodological development related...
Article
SDGs and IPCC Cities offer an unprecedented opportunity for a transformative urban agenda. This also requires bold, integrated action to address constraints imposed by economic, cultural, and political dynamics. In our commentary, we move beyond a narrow, techno-centric view and identify five key knowledge pathways needed to catalyze urban transfor...
Article
Cities are increasingly central to the global governance of climate change, and much of their activity takes place within city‐networks operating at national, regional, and global scales. As the scope and ambition of city activities have been augmented over the past decade, so the scholarship has evolved as well. I set out in this review article to...
Article
This article reviews existing scholarship on the ability of transnational city-networks to contribute to achieving a global 1.5 C target. Its principal observation is that city-networks have become increasingly involved in pooling resources, setting agendas, sharing policies, and reporting emissions reductions, but more needs to be known about how...
Chapter
This chapter aims to chart the principal dynamics of climate change – how it got onto the global agenda, what the principal attempts to govern it have been, and what plausible futures it has over the coming decades. But to start, we ask the question: what type of issue is climate change? Or rather, how has it been and how can it be framed as an iss...
Article
Cities are increasingly seen as essential components of the global response to climate change: setting targets, taking action, and rendering themselves accountable to global audiences for their efforts. Why cities are making themselves globally accountable in the absence of compulsion or obligation, and what it means for cities to operate simultane...
Article
There is substantial evidence that the global governance of climate change must pass through cities. While formal networks offer cities a means of generating effects that extend beyond their own borders, it remains unclear as to whether such networks can address collective action barriers and implementation gaps. City-networks, after all, are limit...
Thesis
Full-text available
Cities are increasingly included in discussions of climate governance and lauded as sources of innovation, leadership, and experimentation. But can they succeed where states have failed in producing meaningful collective actions and effects? To respond to this pressing question requires understanding whether cities can achieve more than rhetorical...
Article
Full-text available
With the prospects for reaching a binding international treaty on emissions mitigation seemingly remote, global climate governance in the near to mid-term future is likely to rely on bottom-up accretion of domestic efforts and initiatives. This opens up new possibilities but also raises questions about the ability of states to produce collective ac...
Chapter
The nature of climate change is such that no one state can solve the problem by itself, nor is any one state likely to incur the costs of emission mitigation without some assurance of comparable action by others (Olson 1965; Hardin 1968). This same dynamic is replicated in federal states: How can one attain joint objectives and coordinated actions...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate governance conducted in settings such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Major Economies Forum, and Group of Twenty (G20) has proven incapable, to date, of generating an effective response. Greenhouse gas emissions have steadily increased since the issue was added to the global agenda in the early...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report draws lessons from experience in the European Union, Australia and Germany and uses them to provide recommendations for how Canadian federal and provincial governments can put in place co-ordinated, effective climate-change policy.

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