David A. Gold

David A. Gold
University of California, Davis | UCD · Earth and Planetary Sciences

PhD

About

65
Publications
10,059
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
649
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
June 2014 - July 2016
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Position
  • Agouron Postdoctoral Fellow
September 2007 - June 2014
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (65)
Article
Full-text available
The phylum Cyanobacteria includes free-living bacteria and plastids, the descendants of cyanobacteria that were engulfed by the ancestral lineage of the major photosynthetic eukaryotic group Archaeplastida. Endosymbiotic events that followed this primary endosymbiosis spread plastids across diverse eukaryotic groups. The remnants of the ancestral c...
Article
Full-text available
We present the genome of the moon jellyfish Aurelia, a genome from a cnidarian with a medusa life stage. Our analyses suggest that gene gain and loss in Aurelia is comparable to what has been found in its morphologically simpler relatives—the anthozoan corals and sea anemones. RNA sequencing analysis does not support the hypothesis that taxonomical...
Article
Organic molecules preserved in ancient rocks can function as ‘biomarkers’, providing a unique window into the evolution of life. While biomarkers demonstrate intriguing patterns through the Neoproterozoic, it can be difficult to constrain particular biomarkers to specific organisms. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the utility of bio...
Article
Molecular and fossil data place the initial diversification of animals in the Neoproterozoic, though there remains too much enough uncertainty to produce an exact chronology. This is unfortunate, as the Neoproterozoic represents a period of intense climate change, including multiple global glaciation events as well changes to ocean chemistry and ox...
Article
Full-text available
Chendytes lawi, an extinct flightless diving anseriform from coastal California, was traditionally classified as a sea duck, tribe Mergini, based on similarities in osteological characters. We recover and analyze mitochondrial genomes of C. lawi and five additional Mergini species, including the extinct Labrador Duck, Camptorhyncus labradorius. Des...
Article
Full-text available
Natural products preserved in the geological record can function as 'molecular fossils', providing insight into organisms and physiologies that existed in the deep past. One important group of molecular fossils is the steroidal hydrocarbons (steranes), which are the diagenetic remains of sterol lipids. Complex sterols with modified side chains are...
Article
Full-text available
The moon jellyfish Aurelia exhibits a dramatic reorganization of tissue during its metamorphosis from planula larva to polyp. There are currently two competing hypotheses regarding the fate of embryonic germ layers during this metamorphosis. In one scenario, the original endoderm undergoes apoptosis and is replaced by a secondary endoderm derived f...
Article
Full-text available
The sponge biomarker hypothesis argues that 24-isopropylcholestanes preserved in Neoproterozoic-age rocks are "molecular fossils" left behind by marine sponges. Despite genetic and geologic support for this hypothesis, 24-isopropylcholestane has never been reported from a sponge body fossil. This lack of direct evidence regarding the source of spon...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650-540 million y ol...
Article
Full-text available
Despite numerous attempts, classification of the Precambrian fossil Dickinsonia has eluded scientific consensus. This is largely because Dickinsonia and its relatives are structurally simple, lacking morphological synapomorphies to clarify their relationship to modern taxa. However, there is increasing precedence for using ontogeny to constrain eni...
Article
Full-text available
Tentacles armed with stinging cells (cnidocytes) are a defining trait of the cnidarians, a phy-lum that includes sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydras. While cnidarian tentacles are generally characterized as structures evolved for feeding and defense, significant variation exists between the tentacles of different species, and within the sam...
Article
Full-text available
In Bilateria, Pax6, Six, Eya and Dach families of transcription factors underlie the development and evolution of morphologically and phyletically distinct eyes, including the compound eyes in Drosophila and the camera-type eyes in vertebrates, indicating that bilaterian eyes evolved under the strong influence of ancestral developmental gene regula...
Article
Full-text available
The POU genes represent a diverse class of animal-specific transcription factors that play important roles in neurogenesis, pluripotency, and cell-type specification. Although previous attempts have been made to reconstruct the evolution of the POU class, these studies have been limited by a small number of representative taxa, and a lack of sequen...
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Assembly Method :: Trinity v. trinityrnaseq_r2013_08_14. Sequencing Technology :: Illumina ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Assembly Method :: Trinity v. trinityrnaseq_r2013_08_14. Sequencing Technology :: Illumina ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Assembly Method :: Trinity v. trinityrnaseq_r2013_08_14. Sequencing Technology :: Illumina ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Assembly Method :: Trinity v. trinityrnaseq_r2013_08_14. Sequencing Technology :: Illumina ##Assembly-Data-END##
Article
Full-text available
Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphal...
Article
Full-text available
Video abstract: At Mistaken Point, Newfoundland, Canada, rangeomorph "fronds" dominate the earliest (579-565 million years ago) fossil communities of large (0.1 to 2 m height) multicellular benthic eukaryotes. They lived in low-flow environments, fueled by uptake [1-3] of dissolved reactants (osmotrophy). However, prokaryotes are effective osmotro...
Data
Data S1. Nucleotide alignment of partial proboscidean and human cytochrome b sequences, highlighting the primers designed.
Article
The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition,...
Article
Full-text available
The study of stem cells in cnidarians has a history spanning hundreds of years, but it has primarily focused on the hydrozoan genus Hydra. While Hydra has a number of self-renewing cell types that act much like stem cells-in particular the interstitial cell line-finding cellular homologues outside of the Hydrozoa has been complicated by the morphol...
Conference Paper
The moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita belongs to the phyla Cnidaria, which includes animals such as sea anemones, corals, and jellyfish. While generally thought to be morphologically simple, some members of this phylum, such as Aurelia, have sophisticated sensory structures, including simple eyes. Recent phylogenetic studies have grouped cnidarians as...
Article
The Ediacaran rangeomorphs represent some of the first attempts at complex life. We use a variety of tools to test the idea that rangeomorphs were osmotrophic, and that their morphology helped them compete for dissolved organic carbon with bacteria.

Network

Cited By