David R Godschalk

David R Godschalk
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | UNC · Department of City and Regional Planning

About

79
Publications
44,654
Reads
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4,135
Citations

Publications

Publications (79)
Article
Looking back at a life as a planner–educator, the author sees many positive signs that three main concepts not only continue to shape the field of planning in fundamental ways, but are gaining steam. First, the primary product of city and regional planning is the creation of good places for people—not only physically, but also socially, economicall...
Article
The article describes how to assess project feasibility with design, development, and regulation in mind. The trade-offs between design and development feasibility are exemplified by the notion of balancing project quality and profit. The competing goals are degrees of aesthetic and functional quality versus rate and amount of financial return. The...
Chapter
This chapter describes the university campus as a central feature in urban development. While driven by its educational mission, campus growth reflects many of the precepts of private real estate development in its quest for additional space. At the same time, the economic importance of the university casts it into a quasi-public role as community...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the creation of the award-winning 2001 Campus Master Plan that was spurred by the need to update the 1988 Campus Framework Plan prepared by Johnson, Johnson, and Roy (1991) and by announcement of significant enrollment increases for the 16-campus University of North Carolina system. The three-year planning process began in 19...
Chapter
This chapter describes the July 3, 2001 Development Plan as an institutional innovation generated during the master planning process to replace the existing building-by-building review under Town zoning. Basically, the University's Development Plan said to the Town, “this is our ten-year list of expected projects that we would like you to review an...
Chapter
This chapter describes the way that decisions were made about the sites where campus buildings and facilities were to be located and about how the design elements of the buildings and landscapes themselves were determined. It unpacks the project design process and its contribution to the goal of a sustainable campus. Project design took the stage a...
Chapter
This chapter argues that the secret to the charm and beauty of the UNC North Campus is its seamless integration of new buildings into the existing landscape. Tree-shaded commons areas are defined by low stone walls and flanked by historic buildings, whose scale and architectural features define a design palette used to ensure the compatibility of n...
Chapter
This chapter presents the sustainability challenge for design of new projects on the North Campus, which was to expand and modernize its traditional arts, sciences, and student living facilities without running rampant over its historic architecture and landscapes. This was demanding because many of these functions were housed in older, sometimes o...
Chapter
This chapter describes how Carolina North represents the next half-century of UNC's campus development potential. Located a mile and a half north of the main campus, the 250-acre Carolina North research campus holds the key to the University's future growth. Implementation of the 2007 Carolina North Plan and the 2009 Development Agreement between C...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the important lessons about sustainable campus development UNC and Chapel Hill learned from their experience in planning, reviewing, and building a huge campus addition during the dynamic decade. They learned to define sustainable campus development as a balance of historic preservation concerns, current development demands,...
Chapter
This chapter shows that much of the new development during the dynamic decade took place on the Southeast Campus, where new project design faced many challenges. Home to student housing, athletics, and support facilities, the Southeast Campus Community was a sprawling collection of large mid-twentieth century buildings without a central place. Alth...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the dense Health Affairs and Health Research Communities at the Southwest Campus. These two communities include four major North Carolina hospitals (Memorial, Women's and Children's, Cancer, and Neurosciences), the UNC Medical, Dental, and Public Health Schools, and a number of related research buildings, as well as parking d...
Chapter
This article focuses on resilience, one of the main goals of urban planning, and describes and analyses some of the key elements that can augment a city's fitness, adaptability, and resilience. It discusses the result of a historical survey of urban resilience through the ages, and describes the present status of policies and programs aimed at buil...
Chapter
Relentless population growth, potential hurricanes and typhoons, and rising sea level threaten to create unsustainable coastal areas. Coastal zone management policy aims for a sustainable coast: one that meets present needs while not constraining the needs of future generations. Sustainability depends upon a working balance among environmental, soc...
Article
Full-text available
Hazard mitigation planners claim that foresighted present actions and investments produce significant future benefits. However, they have difficulty in supporting their claims, since previously their evidence typically was derived from individual case studies. Constituents and decision makers are often sceptical, believing that individual cases are...
Article
Despite the centrality of comprehensive plans to the profession of city and regional planning, there is a gap in knowledge about the quality of plans as they are not routinely evaluated against best practice standards. We discuss plan quality evaluation, an emerging methodology for assessing the quality of plans. We review the evolution of the conc...
Article
Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities, Environmental Justice, and Regional Equity, Robert D. Bullard, editor; foreword by Carl Anthony. 2007. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Article
Full-text available
Mitigation ameliorates the impact of natural hazards on communities by reducing loss of life and injury, property and environmental damage, and social and economic disruption. The potential to reduce these losses brings many benefits, but every mitigation activity has a cost that must be considered in our world of limited resources. In principle be...
Article
Sustainable development and livable communities represent the big visionary ideas of contemporary urban planning. But attempts to implement these popular visions can encounter a host of conflicts. The future of land use planning may well depend on how it copes with these conflicts. I propose the sustainability/livability prism as a tool to understa...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the impacts of land use regulations on cross-metropolitan variations in housing prices, rents and housing starts. Based on a 2002 national survey of local jurisdictions' land use regulations, two indices of regulatory stringency are created: one measures the use of growth management tools and the other measures the impacts of...
Article
Full-text available
ernments plan for and manage urban development, state growth management laws require that citizens be given an opportunity to participate in the local planning process. In this article, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of citizen involvement mandates and the degree to which mandates and related local planning practices have resulted in broad...
Article
Full-text available
Democratic theory holds that active participation in governmental planning and decision making is critical to furthering the public interest. As a result, public participation in urban planning in the US is arguably the most extensive and intensive in the world. Required by federal, state and local laws, citizen involvement is a staple of local pla...
Article
Cities are complex and interdependent systems, extremely vulnerable to threats from both natural hazards and terrorism. This paper proposes a comprehensive strategy of urban hazard mitigation aimed at the creation of resilient cities, able to withstand both types of threats. The paper reviews hazard mitigation practice, defines a resilient city, co...
Article
Incl. abstract, bibl. How are planning educators responding to the challenges and opportunities of distance education? The authors explore this question through a planning school survey, a case study, and brainstorming about change factors. They find that planning education programs are slow to adopt new technology, except for incorporation of e-ma...
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Full-text available
The Second National Assessment on Natural and Related Technological Hazards calls land-use planning the single most promising approach for bringing about sustainable hazard mitigation. This article describes the essential elements of land-use planning for hazard mitigation. It highlights important choices involved in formulating planning processes,...
Article
Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and severe coastal storms, occur frequently in predictable locations. These extreme events become disasters only when they intersect with concentrations of human population and development. State governments whose coastlines are vulnerable to hurricanes and coastal storms can create programs to reduce the...
Article
Human suffering and losses of lives and property in natural disasters can be reduced with appropriate planning for hazardous areas. Federal policies addressing these problems, however, have yet to recognize the importance of planning as the cornerstone of effective local hazard mitigation. In fact, federal programs make planning more difficult beca...
Article
Full-text available
Architects and planners increasingly encounter bitter conflicts during project design reviews and plan approval processes. Traditional public participation processes, such as public hearings, rather than resolving these community disputes, often exacerbate them, leading to impasses and law suits. Responding to this problem, practitioners of collabo...
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Full-text available
Hazard mitigation and land-use planning share a future orientation. They are concerned with anticipating tomorrow's needs, rather than responding to yesterday's problems. Both are proactive rather than reactive. Both seek to gear immediate actions to longer-term goals and objectives. Together they can be powerful tools for reducing the costs of dis...
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Full-text available
Coping with floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes: U.S. Hazard Mitigation Policy -- Mitigation in action: six disaster cases -- Assessig the National Mitigation System -- Recasting the National Mitigation System --
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Full-text available
The 20th century US land use plan has evolved from simple roots in civic design and zoning into an intricate combination of design, policy, and management. Its family tree illustrates how new branches growing from different disciplinary roots have been integrated into contemporary hybrid plans. A source of the vitality of traditional land use plann...
Article
A pilot transportation plan for the Cherokee Indian Reservation in western North Carolina is presented. The plan is a result of the cooperative venture between the federal government, the state of North Carolina, and the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. Ways to increase tribal participation and tribal control over future transportation plannin...
Article
Neighboring governments must increasingly resolve planning and development conflicts that cross their boundaries. The alternative dispute resolution literature advises that mature conflict settlement requires convening an ad hoc group of all affected parties assisted by a third party mediator. This article makes the case for building broader confli...
Article
The implementation history of the Coastal Zone Management Act offers insights into the process of long‐term intergovernmental policy implementation. This five‐stage history is explained as a coproduction process, in which coastal state, environmental, and development advocacy coalitions interacted with congressional committees and the federal coast...
Article
Computerized information processing is profoundly altering, even revolutionizing, the potential for planning and decision support resulting in greatly increased demand for professionals with the knowledge and skills to use this new technology, especially its expression in geographic information systems (GIS). Drawing upon the authors' experience in...
Article
Accurate land supply information often is the missing link in growth management programs. Properly designed computerized land record systems can perform a vital role by continuously tracking the changing attributes of vacant land supply. With this form of decision support, growth policies need not contribute to land and housing price inflation thro...
Article
With more than a decade of operating experience under challenging conditions, the U.S. coastal zone management program has proved the effectiveness of land use federalism. Despite the paradox at its core—the congressional admonition both to conserve and to develop coastal resources—and its lack of sanctions to demand state participation, the coasta...
Chapter
To an outsider, the participants did not seem to belong together. The bearded young man talking at the lectern wore old jeans and had arrived on a motorcycle. The clean-shaven older men in their coats and ties, listening attentively, and their wives in nice print dresses had arrived at the auditorium by bus. A couple of professional-looking men wer...
Article
This guide supplies local governments in North Carolina's coastal region with information on (1) the facilities and activities associated with outer continental shelf (OCS) oil and gas development, (2) their impacts on coastal communities, and (3) how local governments can manage these impacts. Offshore activities and onshore facilities accompanyin...
Article
In search of financial feasibility, American new community developers have tended to privatize planning and goverance and to postpone citizenship for their residents until economic success is in sight. A more balanced national policy of new community development would expand the concept of public-private development partnerships to include open pla...
Article
New town planning since World War II has produced a living laboratory, testing objectives, concepts, and techniques. A study of this experience, which includes proposals for third generation designs, can be extremely revealing, especially on a cross cultural basis. Although many descriptive articles have been published about individual new towns, o...
Article
Urban activities surveys are workable bases for continuing planner-citizen dialogues. Seeking both to inform and to involve citizens, these exchanges also provide the planner with an avenue of collaboration with his client community. Findings from the surveys may be maintained in an activities base, which includes both quantitative and qualitative...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The objective of this project is to explore how developing regional new town networks can provide safe havens for communities threatened by, and retreating from, sea level rise.