David Dennis Gilbertson

David Dennis Gilbertson
University of Plymouth | UoP · Centre for Research in Environment and Society (CeRES)

BA, PGCE, PHD, DSc

About

244
Publications
23,020
Reads
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4,288
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
1195 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
August 2000 - September 2002
Bournemouth University
Position
  • Head of School - Dean
September 1998 - August 2000
University of Northampton
Position
  • Professorial Research Fellow
September 1994 - August 1998
University of Wales Aberystwyth
Position
  • Director and Emeritus Professor

Publications

Publications (244)
Article
The post-depositional alteration of cave sediments is of critical importance for the recognition, identification and investigation of geoarchaeological and palaeoenvironmental evidence. There have been relatively few studies of tropical cave sediments using micromorphology and this work represents one of the most detailed with 26 samples taken from...
Chapter
Book synopsis: This book is the companion volume to Rainforest Foraging and Farming in Island Southeast Asia: the Archaeology of the Niah Caves, Sarawak. Together they present the results of new fieldwork in the caves and new studies of finds from earlier excavations, a project that has involved a team of over 70 archaeologists and geographers. Rai...
Article
Excavations in the photic zones of caves have provided cornerstone archaeological sequences in many parts of the world. Before the appearance of modern dating techniques, cave deposits provided clear evidence for the antiquity, relative ages and co-occurrence of ancient human remains, material culture and fauna. Earlier generations of archaeologist...
Article
Full-text available
The paper describes the initial results from renewed investigations at Niah Cave in Sarawak on the island of Borneo, famous for the discovery in 1958 of the c. 40,000-year old ‘Deep Skull’. The archaeological sequences from the West Mouth and the other entrances of the cave complex investigated by Tom and Barbara Harrisson and other researchers hav...
Article
There has been considerable uncertainty about the nature of Pleistocene environments colonised by the first modern humans in Island SE Asia, and about the vegetation of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the region. Here, the palynology from a series of exposures in the Great Cave of Niah, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, spanning a period from ca. 52,000...
Article
Book synopsis: The Wadi Faynan is a harshly beautiful and desertic landscape in southern Jordan, situated between the hyper-arid deserts of the Wadi 'Arabah and the rugged and wetter Mountains of Edom. Archaeology and Desertification presents the results of the Wadi Faynan Landscape Survey, an inter-disciplinary study of landscape change undertaken...
Article
During recent reinvestigations in the Great Cave of Niah in Borneo, the ‘Hell Trench’ sedimentary sequence seen by earlier excavators was re-exposed. Early excavations here yielded the earliest anatomically-modern human remains in island Southeast Asia. Calibrated radiocarbon dates, pollen, algal microfossils, palynofacies, granulometry and geochem...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of geomorphology, geoarchaeology, pollen, palynofacies, and charcoal indicate the comparative scales and significance of palaeoenvironmental changes throughout the Holocene at the junction between the hyper-arid hot Wadi 'Arabah desert and the front of the Mediterranean-belt Mountains of Edom in southern Jordan through a series of cl...
Article
Full-text available
Virtually all lecturers in geography recognise the importance of fieldwork as a vital mode of teaching in the subject. This paper draws on material produced as part of a HEFCE review of teaching and learning in the field and assesses the implications of recent changes in higher education for field studies in geography. The literature on the develop...
Article
The Pleistocene deposits in the area of the village of Beckford, in the Carrant Valley, Worcestershire are described. A radio-carbon date of 27,650±250 years B.P. has been obtained from plant material in the terrace deposits in the valley. Detailed studies have been made of the terrace sediments and of the remains of Mollusca and Coleoptera in foss...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research in Europe, Africa, and Southeast Asia suggests that we can no longer assume a direct and exclusive link between anatomically modern humans and behavioral modernity (the 'human revolution'), and assume that the presence of either one implies the presence of the other: discussions of the emergence of cultural complexity have to procee...
Article
We are grateful to Cochran and Vidale for their Comment which has stimulated us to clarify and reflect further upon the periodic relationships observed, as well as to elaborate upon various matters that stemmed from a combination of our own understatement and the way we handled the constraints of brevity in relation to our unexpected findings. Neve...
Article
This paper establishes an eight thousand year history of anthropogenic metal pollution at one of the oldest, most important and longest sustained sites of the extraction and smelting of copper ores in the Old World: the Faynan Orefield in Jordan, which is located between the hyper-arid southern desert and the front of the wetter Mountains of Edom....
Chapter
Book synopsis: The Wadi Faynan is a harshly beautiful and desertic landscape in southern Jordan, situated between the hyper-arid deserts of the Wadi 'Arabah and the rugged and wetter Mountains of Edom. Archaeology and Desertification presents the results of the Wadi Faynan Landscape Survey, an inter-disciplinary study of landscape change undertaken...
Chapter
Book synopsis: The Wadi Faynan is a harshly beautiful and desertic landscape in southern Jordan, situated between the hyper-arid deserts of the Wadi 'Arabah and the rugged and wetter Mountains of Edom. Archaeology and Desertification presents the results of the Wadi Faynan Landscape Survey, an inter-disciplinary study of landscape change undertaken...
Chapter
Book synopsis: The Wadi Faynan is a harshly beautiful and desertic landscape in southern Jordan, situated between the hyper-arid deserts of the Wadi 'Arabah and the rugged and wetter Mountains of Edom. Archaeology and Desertification presents the results of the Wadi Faynan Landscape Survey, an inter-disciplinary study of landscape change undertaken...
Article
This chapter sets out the rationale behind the geoarchaeological studies carried out to establish the nature and significance of desertification in the Wadi Faynan landscape, and summarizes the team's principal findings. As a result, it has the following major objectives. The first is to address the academic and practical issues that concern the re...
Article
The frequency of earthquake incidence along the Andaman/Sunda/Java Trench plate-boundary region has been investigated for the ten-lunar-month period 28 October 2004- 19 August 2005, encompassing the 26 December 2004 earthquake. During this period variations in earthquake activity correlate with the tidal-force cycles: maxima in earthquake activity...
Poster
displays novel statistical analyses investigating the relationship between minor - major earthquakes and variations in tidal loading along the Sumatran coast
Article
In this reconnaissance study, skeletal materials from people, dating from ~1500 B.P., who lived by or worked at the ancient copper mines and furnaces of the Wadi Faynan in southern Jordan, were analysed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) to determine the intensities of accumulation of copper and lead in their bones. Many of the bones a...
Article
In this reconnaissance study, skeletal materials from people, dating from ∼1500 B.P., who lived by or worked at the ancient copper mines and furnaces of the Wadi Faynan in southern Jordan, were analysed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) to determine the intensities of accumulation of copper and lead in their bones. Many of the bones a...
Article
Full-text available
Excavations in the photic zones of caves have provided cornerstone archaeological sequences in many parts of the world. Before the appearance of modern dating techniques, cave deposits provided clear evidence for the antiquity, relative ages and co-occurrence of ancient human remains, material culture and fauna. Earlier generations of archaeologist...
Article
This paper introduces the essays in this volume. The challenging complexities of site formation and cave taphonomy in humid tropical environments are emphasized, as is the need for more sophisticated understanding of the geomorphological, biological, and taphonomic processes that affect tropical caves if archaeological remains within them are to be...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents initial interpretations of the processes and events responsible for the late Quaternary sequence in the West Mouth of the Great Cave of Niah, in the hot and humid lowland rainforest and swamp forest of Sarawak in Malaysian Borneo. It evaluates the geomorphological context of the site within the known pattern of rapid late Quater...
Article
Full-text available
This is the first detailed study of the micromorphology of archaeologically important cave sediments in the Great Cave of Niah, in the humid tropics of Sarawak, Borneo. Micromorphology is used to describe the sediments and post-depositional alteration, reconstruct the palaeoenvironments, and refine the environmental history of late Pleistocene depo...
Article
This reconnaissance study of radon concentrations in the Great Cave of Niah in Sarawak shows that in relatively deep pits and trenches in surficial deposits largely covered by protective shelters with poor ventilation, excavators are working in a micro-environment in which radon concentrations at the ground surface can exceed those of the surroundi...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence for early-Holocene environemnts in the Wadi Faynan in the rift-margin in southern Jordan is described. The Early Holocene of Jordan is not well known and palynology, plant microfossils and molluscs from Wadi Faynan provide evidence for a much more humid forest-steppe and steppe environemnt than the present stony desert and highly degraded...
Article
Full-text available
The Faynan area comprises a complex assemblage of deposits and landforms of varying nature, age and position in the landscape. The dominant facies are fluvial, slope and aeolian. At least eight palaeochannels are present at different heights within the Wadis Dana and Ghuwayr. Fewer terraces are preserved in the Wadi Faynan. Planated surfaces leavin...
Article
Concentrations of 222Rn were measured in ancient copper mines which exploited the Faynan Orefield in the South-Western Jordanian Desert. The concentrations of radon gas detected indicate that the ancient metal workers would have been exposed to a significant health risk and indicate that any future attempt to exploit the copper ores must deal with...
Article
Full-text available
This reconnaissance ICP-MS based study of the heavy metal composition of a core in proto-dolomites in a hyper-saline small lagoon in the lower Coorong reveals a distinctive record of eochemical change. A provisional interpretation of the core, estimated to cover a period of ∼2-2.5 thousand years, has been made by inferences to the known chronology...
Chapter
We have explored, and outline herein, the accumulation of copper in humans, plants, and animals in a remote desert area of southwest Jordan, Wadi Faynan, where mining and smelting activities began about 7000 years ago and effectively ceased 1500 years ago. The archaeological core of the area, Khirbet Faynan, is the ruin of the Roman city of Phaino,...
Article
This item outlines ongoing research into past vegetation changes in northwest Borneo.
Article
Skeletal material from 36 people, dating from the early Christian era, who lived by or worked in the notorious Roman copper mines of Phaeno, were analysed to determine their exposure to copper and lead. We demonstrate that many of the bones analysed had a substantially higher concentration of these cations than modern individuals exposed to metals...
Article
An investigation of radon levels in the caves of Creswell Crags, Derbyshire, an important Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) shows that the Lower Magnesian Limestone (Permian) caves have moderate to raised radon gas levels (27-7800 Bq m(-3)) which generally increase with increasing distance into the caves from the entrance regions. This fea...
Article
There has been considerable uncertainty about the nature of Pleistocene environments colonised by the first modern humans in Island SE Asia, and about the vegetation of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the region. Here, the palynology from a series of exposures in the Great Cave of Niah, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, spanning a period from ca. 52,000...
Article
Studies of modern pollen rain from remote islands have raised a number of interesting issues concerning the spatial precision of present-day pollen spectra in relation to their parent plant community types. This paper examines the relationships and degree of correlation between a sequence of contemporary vegetation types, environments and their ass...
Article
Pollen and palynofacies from sheep/goat, rodent and human coprolites of Romano-Libyan, Arab and recent age from a farmstead in the Wadi el-Amud, Tripolitania, Libya are described. There are few differences between assemblages from modern sheep/goat dung and from recent aeolian sand—both contain high percentages of desert species and significant far...
Article
This report describes the fourth season of fieldwork by an interdisciplinary team of archaeologists and geographers working together to reconstruct the landscape history of the Wadi Faynan in southern Jordan. The particular focus of the project is the long-term history of inter-relationships between landscape and people, as a contribution to the st...
Article
This paper explores present understanding of the possible impacts that volcanic eruptions in Iceland might have had upon the environments and traditional farming systems of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, before 'the Clearances' of the late 18th and 19th centuries AD. It reconstructs both the nature of the impacts and the character of the ri...
Article
This paper presents documentary evidence suggesting that the most recent volcanic activity in Germany may have occurred just over 200 years ago, rather than the 11000 years held currently (Ulmener Maar, West Eifel). Several descriptions recounted here suggest that a mountain in Germany, the Gleichberg, may have erupted in the early summer of 1783....
Article
Prehistoric volcanic eruptions in Iceland have been previously described as the most probable causes of several distinctive paleoenvironmental and archeological "events" in the British Isles. These events range in character from the development of sequences of extremely narrow growth rings in the Irish bog-oak tree-ring chronologies, to an inferred...
Article
Full-text available
This paper suggests that sediment depth-age anomalies, and the lithological and palaeoecological properties of a peat core from Borve mire on the Outer Hebridean island of Barra, reflect the episodic impacts of rapid mass-movement of superficial peats and mineral soils from the adjacent hillslopes in the period 3000 to 1750 14C years BP. Alternativ...