David L Dilcher

David L Dilcher
Indiana University Bloomington | IUB · Department of Geology and Department of Biology

Ph.D., Yale University, 1964

About

400
Publications
129,458
Reads
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14,877
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - November 2016
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Recipient of The President's Medal for sustained excellence in service, achievement and leadership
January 2010 - present
Shenyang Normal University
Position
  • HONORARY DEAN
Description
  • Lecture and advise students and Professors in the College of Paleontology.
June 2009 - present
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Professor Emeritus
Description
  • Writing research papers with colleagues.

Publications

Publications (400)
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The data presented in this article are related to the research article titled “Arthropod and fungal herbivory at the dawn of angiosperm diversification: The Rose Creek plant assemblage of Nebraska, U.S.A.” (Xiao et al. 2021) [1]. These data correspond to an examination of arthropod and fungal herbivory on 2084 plant specimens from the Early Cretace...
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Quantitative studies rarely address arthropod herbivory on early angiosperms. We assessed arthropod herbivory from highly sampled, abundant, diverse, and well preserved Early Cretaceous (late Albian) Rose Creek plant assemblage of southeastern Nebraska, USA. We examined 2084 specimens representing 49 species/morphotypes of which 21 are angiosperms...
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Insect fluid–feeding on fossil vascular plants is an inconspicuous and underappreciated mode of herbivory that can provide novel data on the evolution of deep‐time ecological associations and indicate the host‐plant preferences of ancient insect herbivores. Previous fossil studies have documented piercing‐and‐sucking herbivory but often are unable...
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Florivory (flower consumption) occurs worldwide in modern angiosperms, associated with pollen and nectar consumption. However, florivory remains unrecorded from fossil flowers since their Early Cretaceous appearance. We test hypotheses that earliest angiosperms were pollinated by a diverse insect fauna by evaluating 7858 plants from eight localitie...
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Montsechia vidalii is an abundant plant fossil from the Barremian of northeastern Spain. Systematic affinities have been suggested with several living plant clades (liverworts, horsetails, conifers, Gnetales), particularly with angiosperms. We provide detailed descriptions, documentation, and discussion of morphology and histology based on hand spe...
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This study reports the results of an examination of about 1,500 fossil leaf impressions from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) strata at the Hoisington III locality, Kansas, USA. We recognize 24 fossil angiosperm leaf species, of which seven are assignable to the modern orders Illiciales (1), Laurales (4) and Magnoliales (2). Two species show close rel...
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Well-preserved Ginkgo leaves with cuticle were collected from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation in the Daohugou area, Inner Mongolia, China, which form the common elements in the Daohugou flora. Three new species of Ginkgo are recognized and their leaf morphology and cuticular structure are described for the first time. Two different pCO2 p...
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An extinct plant that populated the eastern margin of the Cretaceous Midcontinental Seaway of North America about 100 million years ago has attracted interest as one of the earliest known bisexual flowers in the fossil record. Reexamination of the type specimen of Carpites cordiformis Lesq., and corresponding specimens from sandstones and clays of...
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The morning glory family, Convolvulaceae, is globally important in medicine and food crops. The family has worldwide distribution in a variety of habitats; however, its fossil record is very poorly documented. The current fossil record suggests an origin in North America, which is in contrast to molecular data that indicate an East Gondwana origin....
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A new species of Donlesia (Ceratophyllaceae) from the Early Cretaceous Cheyenne Sandstone of Kansas, USA is reported. The fruits of Donlesia cheyennensis sp. nov. are achenes with four lateral spines, a stylar spine, and a long pedicel. The four lateral spines are arranged on two perpendicular planes. The leaves associated with D. cheyennensis frui...
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The genus Eretmophyllum, a characteristic and widespread taxon of the order Ginkgoales, is restricted in the Mesozoic floras of Eurasia. In China, although some specimens were assigned to Eretmophyllum based on gross leaf morphology, none have epidermal structure, which is essential for species delimitation within this genus. In this paper, we desc...
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Interactions between terrestrial arthropods and plants play a significant role in terrestrial ecosystems. Research on plant-insect interactions through geologic time provides valuable information for studying insect behavior and plant structure, understanding their coevolution, as well as analyzing climate change. In this paper, we choose fossil gi...
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The Middle Jurassic Daohugou Biota is named for a fossil assemblage after a village in Ningcheng County, Inner Mongolia, China. Over the last twenty-five years, abundant, exceptionally well-preserved fossils have been reported from various localities in the Daohugou area. While the fauna of the Daohugou Biota has been well-studied, little research...
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The genus Sphenarion (Czekanowskiales) was first established for some fossil leaves from the Middle Jurassic Yorkshire flora of England. There are relatively few reports of Sphenarion with epidermal structures in the Mesozoic floras of Eurasia since its establishment. In this paper we describe a new species, Sphenarion angustae n. sp., from the Mid...
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Mid-Mesozoic kalligrammatid lacewings (Neuroptera) entered the fossil record 165 million years ago (Ma) and disappeared 45 Ma later. Extant papilionoid butterflies (Lepidoptera) probably originated 80–70 Ma, long after kalligrammatids became extinct. Although poor preservation of kalligrammatid fossils previously prevented their detailed morphologi...
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Although the genus Phoenicopsis is the most common member of Czekanowskiales and is considered an indicative representative of the Middle Jurassic Coniopteris–Phoenicopsis assemblage in northern China, little was known about its taxonomy and biodiversity based upon the leaf cuticular structure. In this paper, three subgenera of the genus Phoenicops...
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The early diversification of angiosperms in diverse ecological niches is poorly understood. Some have proposed an origin in a darkened forest habitat and others an open aquatic or near aquatic habitat. The research presented here centers on Montsechia vidalii, first recovered from lithographic limestone deposits in the Pyrenees of Spain more than 1...
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The early diversification of angiosperms in diverse ecological niches is poorly understood. Some have proposed an origin in a darkened forest habitat and others an open aquatic or near aquatic habitat. The research presented here centers on Montsechia vidalii, first recovered from lithographic limestone deposits in the Pyrenees of Spain more than 1...
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Archaeamphora longicervia H. Q. Li was described as an herbaceous, Sarraceniaceae-like pitcher plant from the mid Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Here, a re-investigation of A. longicervia specimens from the Yixian Formation provides new insights into its identity and the morphology of pitcher plants clai...
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Clathropteris was a typical dipterid fern with well documented fossil record and was widely dispersed during the Mesozoic; however, our knowledge of fertile structures including in situ spores for this genus is still very limited. Here we report well-preserved compression specimens of Clathropteris obovata Oishi from the Late Triassic of Guangyuan,...
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A new species of Phoenicopsis subgenus Windwardia (Florin) Samylina, Phoenicopsis neimengg11ensis sp.nov., is recognized from the Middle Jurassic Zhaogou Formation in the Shiguai Basin, a Jurassic coal-bearing sedimentary basin in Inner Mongolia, China. Linear leaves are in bundles of six to eight and are attached on a short shoot The leaf is amphi...
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The Early Cretaceous Yingzuilazi Formation is exposed in the Baishan Basin, Baishan region of the southeastern Jilin Province, China. So far, no reports on fossil plants from this formation have been published. During recent field excursions, abundant faunal remains belonging to the Early Cretaceous Lycoptera-Ephemeropsis-Eosestheria assemblage of...
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Premise of research: A large number of fossil coryphoid palm wood and fruits have been reported from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of India. We document the oldest well-preserved and very rare costapalmate palm leaves and inflorescence like structures from the same horizon. Methodology: A number of specimens were collected from Maastrichtian–Danian...
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Plant fossils are described from upper Paleocene and lower Eocene marine sediments of the Tuscahoma, Bashi and Hatchetigbee formations at Meridian, Mississippi. The water-worn material includes three-dimensionally preserved fruits, fern rhizomes, and gymnosperm and angiosperm wood fragments. Based upon the fifteen fruit specimens currently availabl...
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A new species, Nilssoniopteris binggouensis (Bennettitales), is recognized from the Lower Cretaceous Binggou Formation from western Liaoning Province, northeast China. This is the first time that fossil plants are reported from the Early Cretaceous Binggou Formation from Liaoning Province. The new species is one of the youngest-known Bennettitales...
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The new discovery of angiosperm remains in the Jehol Biota of northeastern China contributes to our understanding of the origin and early evolution of flowering plants. The earliest eudicot genus with reproductive organs, Leefructus, was recently documented from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation at 125.8 to 122.6 million years ago (Ma), and was...
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Premise of the study: The family Magnoliaceae s.l. is a basal angiosperm family with two subfamilies-Magnolioideae and Liriodendroideae, which differ by the types and structure of their fruits and seeds. The late Albian genus Archaeanthus shares many features of its reproductive organs with Magnoliaceae s.l., but its pericarp anatomy was never stu...
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A new structurally preserved fern rhizome species, Ashicaulis beipiaoensis (Osmundaceae), is described from the Middle Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation in Beipiao City, Liaoning Province, northeastern China. The rhizome, with a maximum diameter of 4.0–4.5 cm, is composed of a homogeneous parenchymatous pith, an ectophloic-dictyoxylic siphonostele, a t...
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In this report, we examine fossil plant reproductive materials from the Warman clay pit in western Tennessee. The investigation of about 600 specimens has resulted in the recognition of 60 species and morphotypes. Based upon comparisons of gross morphology of these specimens with available extant plant materials and the literature, we have been abl...
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The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145-65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms...