David Ciplet

David Ciplet
University of Colorado Boulder | CUB · Department of Environmental Studies

About

45
Publications
5,400
Reads
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899
Citations
Citations since 2017
21 Research Items
800 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Central to climate justice is the question of who will pay for the mitigation and adaptation efforts needed as the climate crisis worsens, particularly in countries that bear little responsibility for global greenhouse gas emissions. Climate finance is a complex set of mechanisms intended to address this concern. World-systems theory has long under...
Article
Full-text available
The Climate and Development Lab at Brown University, USA, teamed up with the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh to develop a typology of 14 ways developed nations have resisted efforts by the developing world to create funding mechanisms under the UNFCCC to pay for losses and damages resulting from climate change....
Article
Full-text available
There is limited evidence that socially responsible investment (SRI) strategies can resolve persistent concerns brought up in scholarship on the industry, particularly as it relates to considerations of justice. It is critical that SRI initiatives be interrogated about their broader impacts on environmental inequality and justice in the context of...
Article
From its origins in the labor and environmental justice movements in the United States, the concept of a just transition has travelled globally as a frame to infuse concerns of justice in public responses to escalating environmental crises. However, important gaps remain in terms of understanding the potential of transition efforts to be transforma...
Article
There is growing international attention to the goal of universal energy access. Despite this, large financial gaps remain a major obstacle for realizing global energy justice for all communities. Drawing on political theories of global distributive justice, this article develops and applies a framework for how multilateral development assistance f...
Article
Full-text available
Based on a systematic review of journal articles, books and book chapters, and policy papers, we evaluate possible sources of finance for addressing loss and damage from slow onset climate events in developing countries. We find that most publications explore insurance schemes which are not appropriate for most slow onset events. From this, we dete...
Article
Addressing concerns of justice related to energy has gained increased international attention with the adoption of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. However, scholarship has largely neglected connections between the concepts of sustainable development and energy justice, and offers few related evaluative tools. Moreover, the domina...
Article
Full-text available
The 2009 pledge to mobilize US$100 billion a year by 2020 in climate finance to developing nations was not specific on what types of funding could count. Indeterminacy and questionable claims make it impossible to know if developed nations have delivered; as 2020 passes, opportunity exists to address these failures in a new pledge.
Article
Full-text available
How much finance should be provided to support climate change adaptation and by whom? How should it be allocated, and on what basis? Over the years, various actors have expressed different normative expectations on climate finance. Which of these expectations are being met and which are not; why, and with what consequences? Have new norms and rules...
Article
Full-text available
The original article has been updated. Unfortunately the uncorrected version of the article was published online. This has been corrected.
Article
Recent scholarship presents conflicting views on the ability of grassroots movements to resist neoliberal globalization. This article moves beyond this broad debate. It explores the specific challenges and opportunities faced by networks of the marginalized, and their allies, as they attempt to transform neoliberal global governance. The Global All...
Article
The concept of a ‘just transition’ positions justice concerns of workers, front-line communities, and other marginalized groups at the center of sustainability efforts. However, related scholarship has largely neglected conflicts that arise between sustainability and justice goals. A framework is developed to identify three main tensions that plann...
Chapter
The chapter looks at the changing nature of politics in the United Nations climate negotiations around the concept of ecologically unequal exchange, focusing on the lead-up to and aftermath of the 2015 Paris negotiations. We identify and discuss three areas of tension that have emerged within the G-77 coalition: tensions within the global semi-peri...
Article
We develop and apply a new theoretical framework for assessing the transformative capability of transparency in environmental governance. Our framework suggests that as norms related to transparency are recognized and translated into accountability mechanisms, and as these mechanisms are complied with, effects cascade and substantially influence th...
Article
This article analyzes distinct articulations and forms of political integration of the frame ‘climate debt’ in United Nations climate politics from 2000 to 2015. In analysis of this case study, the framework of ‘counter-hegemonic frame integration’ is developed by which political incorporation of disruptive frames into multilateral regimes can be a...
Article
What are the guiding principles of contemporary international governance of climate change and to what extent do they represent neoliberal forms? We document five main political and institutional shifts within the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and outline core governance practices for each phase. In discussing the current phase...
Article
Full-text available
The article examines the changing nature of politics in the United Nations climate negotiations through the lens of ecologically unequal exchange theory, focusing on the lead up to and aftermath of the 2015 Paris negotiations. We identify and discuss three areas of tension that have emerged within the G-77 coalition: tensions within the global semi...
Book
Full-text available
Climate finance is at the core of the UNFCCC efforts to help the world adequately adapt to climate change, and is absolutely critical to developing countries’ abilities to prepare and protect themselves from climate change impacts. Transparency in the reporting of climate finance is crucial for building and maintaining trust among nations if the in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Submission by Brown University’s Climate and Development Lab on behalf of AdaptationWatch to the UNFCCC Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice on the development of modalities for the accounting of financial resources provided and mobilized through public interventions in accordance with Article 9, paragraph 7, of the Paris Agreeme...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the engagement of business and environmental nonstate actors in the climate regime, how their efforts have changed over time, and insights from the literature in this area. The goal is to understand how each of them influence humanity's response to climate change, through the UN process and back home in their countries of ori...
Chapter
This introductory chapter discusses how our current response to climate change has been inadequate and inequitable. During UN climate negotiations, nations still talk about climate inaction. Developed countries emphasize the importance of climate issues, but climate change is largely a product of their own unconstrained greenhouse gas emissions. Na...
Chapter
This chapter explores global shifts as they took shape during the 2009 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Copenhagen. These negotiations marked the beginning of a new equation of power shift beyond the conventional North–South divide. Copenhagen provided a world stage where a new alignment of five of the largest countries—the Uni...
Chapter
This chapter pays attention to climate change adaptation politics and describes the types of political conflicts that have emerged around the issue of funding for adaptation. It discusses three main points of contention between countries on both sides of the North–South divide. These conflicts are referred to as the Gap (in raising the funds), the...
Chapter
This chapter outlines six potential scenarios in a warming world. It develops a framework for analyzing change across two axes, level of democracy and level of sustainability. The scenarios range from quite catastrophic to very positive outcomes. The chapter points out key decision points, power relations, and political and material conditions shap...
Chapter
This chapter draws on theories, particularly the scholarship of Antonio Gramsci, in offering a strategic framework that considers power relations. It argues that the world is not the same as it was back in 2008 before the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Copenhagen. It explores recent shifts in power dynamics and considers thei...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the aftermath of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). It looks at how low-income-state consent was produced during the following years and how it transformed into the current emissions reduction framework that is both highly inadequate and inequitable. It argues that consent was produced through three inter...
Chapter
This chapter explores the role of civil society in climate change politics, and argues that the literature on this topic has not fully accounted for the failure of civil society to influence mitigation action. It highlights three main deficits. First, despite the diversification of actors involved in the negotiations, resources and links to power s...
Chapter
This chapter explores the engagements of three distinct transnational advocacy networks in the UN climate change regime: networks working for gender equality in climate governance, indigenous peoples, and waste pickers (informal sector recyclers). These networks have all sought to gain certain rights in the climate regime to redress forms of margin...
Chapter
This chapter summarizes the book's main arguments and considers how global climate justice might be achieved in the coming years. Given the need for independent actors whose focus is on the global public good of avoiding catastrophic climatic change, it argues that a transformed approach of civil society is our best hope for realizing an equitable,...
Book
After nearly a quarter century of international negotiations on climate change, we stand at a crossroads. A new set of agreements is likely to fail to prevent the global climate’s destabilization. Islands and coastlines face inundation, and widespread drought, flooding, and famine are expected to worsen in the poorest and most vulnerable countries....
Article
This article analyzes how low-income state agreement has been produced for contemporary international climate change treaties. These treaties have dramatically weakened the legal framework for action on climate change, with likely unequal impacts in the poorest countries. The case demonstrates that theories of international cooperation are not full...
Article
Scholarship on transnational advocacy networks has not articulated the diversity and range of rights struggles that take place in international regimes, particularly those of networks representing marginal or vulnerable groups. In this article I explore the engagements of three networks in the UN climate change regime: gender equality advocates, in...
Article
Finance for developing countries to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change now tops the international climate negotiation agenda. In this article, we first assess how adaptation finance came to the top of the agenda. Second, drawing upon Amartya Sen’s (2010) “realization-focused comparison” theory of justice, we develop a definition of adap...
Article
The scholarship on international relations has identified a dramatic shift in the governing structure of the global arena, with actors other than governments—including civil society organizations, capital, and international bureaucracies—playing an increasingly active role. But how has this transition affected the rights, obligations, and influence...
Article
This article discusses the evolution and work of Brown University’s Climate and Development Lab (CDL). As leaders of the CDL, we engaged students in experiential education while attending the United Nations climate change negotiations in Cancun, Mexico in 2010, and in Durban, South Africa in 2011. Simultaneously, we collaborated with students to pr...
Article
Full-text available
Community-engaged research on environmental problems has reshaped researcher-participant relationships, academic-community interaction, and the role of community partners in human subjects protection and ethical oversight. We draw on our own and others' research collaborations with environmental health and justice social movement organizations to d...
Article
Full-text available
The scholarship on international relations has identified a dramatic shift in the governing structure of the global arena, with actors other than governments-including civil society organizations, capital, and international bureaucracies-playing an increasingly active role. But how has this transition affected the rights, obligations, and influence...
Article
This paper asks the question “What are the key elements to building an effective United States-based worker cooperative movement in the context of global capitalism?” Data was collected by reviewing literature in the field, interviewing 24 worker cooperative movement activists, attending a Network of Bay Area Worker Cooperatives (NoBAWC) meeting, r...

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