David A. Buehler

David A. Buehler
University of Tennessee | UTK · Department of ​Forestry, Wildlife & Fisheries

Doctor of Philosophy Virginia Tech

About

128
Publications
21,889
Reads
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2,536
Citations
Citations since 2017
23 Research Items
1106 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Additional affiliations
September 1991 - present
University of Tennessee
Position
  • Professor- Wildlife Science

Publications

Publications (128)
Article
Full-text available
Aim Climate change is affecting the distribution of species and subsequent biotic interactions, including hybridization potential. The imperiled Golden‐winged Warbler (GWWA) competes and hybridizes with the Blue‐winged Warbler (BWWA), which may threaten the persistence of GWWA due to introgression. We examined how climate change is likely to alter...
Article
Fields dominated by nonnative grasses, such as tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus), are being restored to native plant communities across the eastern U.S. Upon restoration, disturbance is necessary to maintain native communities in an early seral stage, and plant response to different management practices is of interest to managers to guide habi...
Article
Full-text available
The Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) is a declining Nearctic–Neotropical migratory songbird of conservation concern. Implementing full annual cycle conservation strategies to facilitate recovery has been difficult because we know little about the migratory period or strength of migratory connectivity between North American breeding and South Am...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, grasslands have been heavily degraded, more so than any other biome. Grasslands of the eastern U.S. are no exception to this trend and, consequently, native biota associated with the region’s >20 million ha of agricultural grasslands are under considerable stress. For example, grassland associated breeding bird populations have declined p...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration of early successional plant communities dominated by nonnative plant species is a central focus of many state and federal agencies to improve habitat for wildlife associated with these communities. Restoration efforts largely have concentrated on controlling nonnative species followed by planting native grasses and forbs. However, there...
Article
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Restoration of native early successional plant communities in the eastern United States is a conservation priority because of declining populations of associated plants and wildlife. Restoration typically involves seeding native species and is often fraught with problems including weedy competition, expensive seed, and slow establishment. Pairing s...
Article
Grassland birds have experienced protracted population declines, primarily due to loss and degradation of native grasslands. Restoration of native grasses may benefit grassland birds, but such restoration within the eastern United States has been limited. Production uses of native grasses (e.g., hay, pasture, biofuel feedstock) provide market-based...
Article
Globally, agricultural ecosystems continue to be the most imperiled for biodiversity. Subsequently, countries focused on cost-share conservation programs whereby private landowners are paid to conserve or restore their land. In the United States, populations of grassland and shrubland breeding birds continue to decline, despite state, federal, and...
Article
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Birdsong has captivated humans throughout recorded history. Birdsong is incredibly diverse as is the process of song learning (Kroodsma 2004, Beecher and Brenowitz 2005). Songbirds (Order: Passeriformes) are categorized into two broad groups based on whether they learn their songs (oscine) or whether the development of species‐appropriate songs is...
Article
Grasslands were once common in the eastern United States and provided habitat for numerous grassland‐dependent wildlife. However, native grasslands in this region have largely been eliminated as a result of conversion to other land uses (e.g., urban development, row‐crops), altered disturbance regimes (e.g., lack of fire and grazing), or conversion...
Article
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Monitoring northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) breeding populations is an important component of the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative as a means of evaluating success of achieving population goals. Northern bobwhite populations declined by 3.8% from 1980 to 2006 in the Central Hardwoods Bird Conservation Region (CHBCR). Northern bobwhi...
Article
To determine the diverse motivations of eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) hunters, a self-administered questionnaire was developed and mailed to a sample of 5,000 licensed turkey hunters in Tennessee (response rate = 36%). A cluster analysis yielded three types of respondents in terms of their hunting motivations: social harvesters (44%), e...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Identifying drivers of population trends in migratory animals is difficult due to their reliance on different geographic regions throughout the annual cycle. Populations of Nearctic–Neotropical migratory birds are often thought to be limited by spatial variation in factors affecting reproduction and survival during the breeding season....
Article
Lisovski et al.[1] describe the widely recognized limitations of light-level geolocator data for identifying short-distance latitudinal movements, recommend that caution be used when interpreting such data, intimated that we did not use such caution and argued that environmental shading likely explained the Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysopt...
Article
Full-text available
Avian monitoring strategies are usually linked to bird singing or calling behavior. Individual availability for detection can change as a result of conspecific factors affecting bird behavior, though the magnitude of these effects is difficult to quantify. We evaluated behavioral and temporal factors affecting Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus...
Data
Radio-collared Northern Bobwhite data. These are raw detection histories and associated variables from radio-collared Northern Bobwhite individuals used for all analyses. (XLSX)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Extended abstract—The eastern oak (Quercus) forest ecosystem once included extensive open-canopy and early successional communities (i.e., woodlands and savannahs) that had been maintained by frequent natural and anthropogenic fires (Burhans et al. 2016). However, beginning in the early Twentieth Century and continuing until the present, fire regim...
Article
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Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) are Nearctic-Neotropical migrants experiencing varied regional population trends not fully explained by breeding-grounds factors such as nest success. A lack of detailed information on the nonbreeding distributions, migration routes, or timing of migration among populations hampers our ability to ident...
Article
Full-text available
For at-risk wildlife species, it is important to consider conservation within the process of adaptive management. Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) are Neotropical migratory songbirds that are experiencing long-term population declines due in part to the loss of early-successional nesting habitat. Recently-developed Golden-winged Warbl...
Article
Full-text available
Closed‐canopy forests dominate the landscape across much of the eastern United States and often lack a well‐developed understory, which limits nutrition available for cervids. We evaluated the influence of timber harvest combined with prescribed fire, herbicide treatment, or fire and herbicide treatment in young mixed‐hardwood forests on forage ava...
Article
Full-text available
Edges, including roads, can have unintended deleterious impacts on wildlife. However, roads also present opportunities for replicable, and spatially and temporally consistent, wildlife monitoring. Assessing sources of variability associated with roadside-based surveys could improve the accuracy and extend the inferences of surveys, thus strengtheni...
Article
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Avian habitat selection occurs at multiple spatial scales to incorporate life history requirements. Breeding habitat of Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) is characterized by largely forested landscapes containing natural or anthropogenic disturbance elements that maintain forest patches in early stages of succession. Breeding habitat o...
Article
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Brood division in the postfledging period is a common avian behavior that is not well understood. Brood division has been reported in Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera), but it is not known how common this behavior is, whether males and females exhibit different strategies related to parental care and habitat use, or how brood division...
Article
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The relationship between landscape structure and composition and full-season productivity (FSP) is poorly understood for most birds. For species of high conservation concern, insight into how productivity is related to landscape structure and composition can be used to develop more effective conservation strategies that increase recruitment. We mon...
Article
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In migratory species, breeding and non-breeding locations are geographically separate, yet the effects of conditions from one stage may carry over to affect a subsequent stage. Ideally, to understand the mechanisms and implications of ‘carry-over effects’, one would need to follow individuals throughout the year, quantify potential environmental ca...
Article
Grassland birds have declined more than any other guild in the United States because of loss and degradation of native grasslands. The United States Department of Agriculture Farm Bill programs have restored some native warm-season grasses (NWSG), but populations of many grassland bird species continue to decline. Market-based NWSG uses focused on...
Article
Full-text available
Oak (Quercus spp.) woodlands and savannas throughout the Mid-South, USA have become closed-canopy forests through succession in the absence of fire, contributing to declines in disturbance-dependent avian species. Restoration could ameliorate these trends, but effects of such management practices on avian communities of the Mid-South are poorly und...
Data
The .lig files are comma separated time stamped ASCII data files where each time-stamped record is on a separate line. The header line of each file contains a three-variable string. Its meaning is unclear. The header lines are removed before data analysis. The .lig files can be opened by any text editors. The original data analysis is read into R u...
Book
Full-text available
PDF of book and chapters available at https://conservancy.umn.edu/handle/11299/189700
Article
Full-text available
Among shrubland-and young forest-nesting bird species in North America, Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) are one of the most rapidly declining partly because of limited nesting habitat. Creation and management of high quality vegetation communities used for nesting are needed to reduce declines. Thus, we examined whether common charac...
Article
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The use of light-level geolocators is increasingly common for connecting breeding and nonbreeding sites and identifying migration routes in birds. Until recently, the mass and size of geolocators precluded their use on songbird species weighing <12 g. Reducing the mass of geolocators, such as by shortening or eliminating the light stalk, may make t...
Article
Many wildlife management prescriptions are either implicitly or explicitly designed to improve habitat quality for a focal species, but habitat quality is often difficult to quantify. Depending upon the approach used to define and identify high-quality habitat, management decisions may differ widely. Although individual-level measures of habitat qu...
Article
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Relatively low fecundity may be responsible for lower Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) populations in the southern Appalachians compared to those in more northern areas of the species' range. Nutritional stress imposed by poor-quality habitat and greater nest predation have been cited as negative influences on reproduction in the region. We monitore...
Article
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Migration is a common behavior used by animals of many taxa to occupy different habitats during different periods [1]. Migrant birds are categorized as either facultative (i.e., those that are forced to migrate by some proximal cue, often weather) or obligate (i.e., those that migrate on a regular cycle) [2, 3]. During migration, obligate migrants...
Article
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Colorful plumage traits in birds may convey multiple, redundant, or unreliable messages about an individual. Plumage may reliably convey information about disparate qualities such as age, condition, and parental ability because discrete tracts of feathers may cause individuals to incur different intrinsic or extrinsic costs. Few studies have examin...
Article
Full-text available
Colorful plumage traits in birds may convey multiple, redundant, or unreliable messages about an individual. Plumage may reliably convey information about disparate qualities such as age, condition, and parental ability because discrete tracts of feathers may cause individuals to incur different intrinsic or extrinsic costs. Few studies have examin...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring wetland wildlife is complex and requires use of various techniques to obtain robust population estimates. Herpetofauna, birds and mammals frequently inhabit wetlands and adjacent uplands. Sampling herpetofauna can include passive techniques such as visual encounter and breeding call surveys, and capture techniques that use nets and traps...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation strategies for declining species often are based on limited knowledge about how fecundity and survival may change across a species' range, and what factors may be limiting for a given population. Incomplete understanding of how a species' demography varies across a range of conditions may lead to inappropriate management decisions. Our...
Article
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Point counts are commonly used to assess changes in bird abundance, including analytical approaches such as distance sampling that estimate density. Point‐count methods have come under increasing scrutiny because effects of detection probability and field error are difficult to quantify. For seven forest songbirds, we compared fixed‐radii counts (5...
Article
Full-text available
Forest cover in the eastern United States has increased over the past century and while some late-successional species have benefited from this process as expected, others have experienced population declines. These declines may be in part related to contemporary reductions in small-scale forest interior disturbances such as fire, windthrow, and tr...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of habitat selection are often of limited utility because they focus on small geographic areas, fail to examine behavior at multiple scales, or lack an assessment of the fitness consequences of habitat decisions. These limitations can hamper the identification of successful site-specific management strategies, which are urgently needed for...
Article
Full-text available
Oak (Quercus spp.) savannas are among the most imperiled ecosystems in the United States. Consequently, associated vegetation and avian communities are also in decline. Furthermore, restoration of savanna communities may be an important strategy for conserving avian species that require early successional habitat, a type underrepresented on regiona...
Article
Full-text available
Setophaga cerulea (Cerulean Warbler) is one of the fastest declining avian species in the United States, and its conservation has been hampered by a lack of basic biological information. Here we describe basic breeding biology and behavior and report incidental observations of scientific interest from three years of research on Cerulean Warblers in...
Article
Vertebrate insectivores such as bats are a pervasive top-down force on prey populations in forest ecosystems. Conservation focusing on forest-dwelling bats requires understanding of community-level interactions between these predators and their insect prey. Our study assessed bat activity and insect occurrence (abundance and diversity) across a gra...
Article
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Resumen. – ¿Preocupaciones de temporada y respuesta a la gestión forestal: gestión forestal puede producir más de aves de cría? – Las Reinitas Cerúleas (Setophaga cerulea) , una de las especies de aves que ha declinado más rápidamente in Norte América, están asociadas con doseles heterogéneos de bosques maduros de hoja ancha. Sin embargo, la edad d...
Conference Paper
Early successional hardwood forests constitute important breeding habitat for many migratory songbirds. Declines in populations of these species suggest changes in habitat availability either on the species’ wintering grounds or on their early successional breeding grounds. We used Forest Inventory and Analysis data from 11 states across four decad...
Chapter
Full-text available
Early successional habitats are an important part of the forest landscape for supporting avian communities. As the frequency and extent of the anthropogenic disturbances have declined, suitable habitat for scrub-shrub bird species also has decreased, resulting in significant declines for many species. We related changes in the proportion and distri...
Article
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Conspecific egg destruction is an adaptive behavior that has typically evolved in multi-brooded, polygynous, or colonial avian species, and can be difficult to observe. We describe the first case of egg destruction in the Parulidae, which consists of mostly single-brooded and socially monogamous species. In this case, a female Cerulean Warbler (Den...
Article
Full-text available
The Appalachian Cooperative Grouse Research Project (ACGRP) was a multistate cooperative effort initiated in 1996 to investigate the apparent decline of ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and improve management throughout the central and southern Appalachian region (i.e., parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, an...
Article
Biparental care is common in birds, with the allocation of effort being highly variable between the sexes. In most songbird species, the female typically provides the most care early in the breeding cycle with both parents providing care when provisioning young. Food provisioning should be directly related to offspring quality; however, the relativ...
Article
Full-text available
We report a male Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) singing a highly accurate version of another species' song (Hooded Warbler; Wilsonia citrina), as well as a typical Cerulean Warbler song. We performed playback experiments to examine the manner in which this bird used, and responded to, the different songs. He responded aggressively (wing flick...
Article
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In many songbirds, the nesting period for a breeding attempt is extremely short, often lasting only a few weeks. Breeding adults can shorten this period by decreasing the number of eggs laid or reducing the length of the nestling period. Nestling-period length has received little attention in the literature but could have profound effects on annual...
Article
Full-text available
We used a 60-yr forest simulation of the Cherokee National Forest, Tennessee, USA, to model the effects of timber harvest and natural disturbance upon habitat availability for 6 songbird species: Acadian flycatcher (Epidonax virescens), blue-headed vireo (Vireo solitarius), chestnut-sided warbler (Dendroica pensylvanica), tufted titmouse (Parus bic...