David Brandenberger

David Brandenberger
University of Richmond | UR · Department of History

About

81
Publications
3,123
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446
Citations
Citations since 2016
25 Research Items
194 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202205101520253035
201620172018201920202021202205101520253035
201620172018201920202021202205101520253035

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
At the height of his cult of personality in 1938, Stalin deleted almost all references to his prerevolutionary career within the Bolshevik underground from the canonical Short Course on party history. Recognizing the challenge that this editing poses to traditional understandings of the personality cult, this article analyzes Stalin’s excisions fro...
Article
The term “internationalism” underwent a series of dramatic, semantic transformations in the USSR between 1917 and 1991. This article offers a Begriffsgeschichte-style analysis of the conceptual history of the term, tracking its usage in the official press over the course of the Soviet Union's existence. Such a broad, systematic survey indicates tha...
Article
This critical analysis of Joan Neuberger’s book This Thing of Darkness (Cornell University Press, 2019) hails the monograph for its exhaustive research and thorough analysis. Eisenstein stands out in the pages of This Thing of Darkness as the quintessential non-conformist — an exception to everything we know about Soviet subjectivity. Neuberger arg...
Article
Full-text available
David Brandenberger holds a doctorate in history (PhD.) and is professor of Russian and Soviet history in the Department of History at the University of Richmond (USA). He is also an associate researcher at the National Research University “Higher School of Economics” in Moscow. He is the author of books on the formation of Russian national identit...
Article
This essay focuses on the career of N. V. Solov’ev, a prominent Stalin-era official and little-known victim of the 1949 Leningrad Affair. When treated as a case study, Solov’ev’s life and times illustrate a variety of important things about Stalinism as a whole. Most obviously, Solov’ev’s rapid ascent into the party nomenklatura during the interwar...
Article
Full-text available
Raised under Stalin: Young Communists and the Defense of Socialism. By Seth Bernstein. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2017. xi, 254 pp. Appendix. Notes. Bibliography. Index. Illustrations. Photographs. Tables. $55.00, hard bound. - Volume 77 Issue 4 - David Brandenberger
Article
As the hundredth anniversary of the October Revolution approaches, even a casual survey of the literature reveals scores of accounts of the Bolshevik seizure of power, written by commentators, participants and eyewitnesses from all across the political spectrum. Indeed, it seems as if no sooner had the Bolsheviks managed to seize power on the stree...
Article
Full-text available
The last major bout of Stalin-era political repression, the 1949-1952 "Leningrad Affair" was a purge that affected not only that city's local party organization, but an array of other similar regional bodies. This purge resulted in the execution of a number of leading party and state officials; it also ruined many others' lives, careers and familie...
Article
Internationalism was a core element of early Bolshevik propaganda; despite the leadership’s growing pragmatism after the October 1917 revolution, the concept remained key to party self-representation. During the late 1930s, however, this engagement with internationalism atrophied – something traditionally explained as a sign of growing pragmatism,...
Article
The 1949-1952 Leningrad Affair triggered a major wave of repression directed against that city's institutions promoting the memory of the 1941-1944 blockade. Books were withdrawn from circulation, prominent historians were accused of wrongdoing, and the museum dedicated to the blockade was liquidated. The historiography on the subject is underdevel...
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Sergei Kremlev, Zachem ubili Stalina? Prestuplenie veka. Moscow: Yauza, Eskmo, 2008, 480pp., 237 rubles. V. D. Kuznechevskii, ‘Leningradskoe delo’: Naivnaya popytka sozdat’ etnicheski chistoe russkoe pravitel’stvo byla utoplena v krovi. Moscow: Rossiiskii institut strategicheskikh issledovanii, 2013, 84pp., 207 rubles. Sigizmund Mironin, Stalinskii...
Article
As a cornerstone of early Bolshevik propaganda, nationality policy allowed the revolutionary regime to cast the Soviet “experiment” as emancipatory in both ethnic and class terms. Paradoxically, much of the attention paid to the national question vanished from the party canon in 1938, for reasons that have never been fully explained. In this articl...
Article
Over the past 15 years, new research has begun to reevaluate Soviet-era ideology, taking the regime's ostensible commitment to Marxism-Leninism far more seriously than much of what was published during the Cold War. Foundational texts have been reread, biographies rewritten, historical experiences reassessed, and fictional and cinematic texts revie...
Article
The USSR is often regarded as the world's first propaganda state. Particularly under Stalin, politically charged rhetoric and imagery dominated the press, schools, and cultural forums from literature and cinema to the fine arts. Yet party propagandists were repeatedly frustrated in their efforts to promote a coherent sense of "Soviet" identity duri...
Article
I am grateful to Andreas Umland and David Marples for their thoughtful responses to my piece and appreciate the invitation of the editors of Nationalities Papers to briefly reply. Because “Stalin's Populism” is an essay rather than an article devoted to empirical research, historiography or contemporary politics, some of the objections that Umland...
Article
Keywords: Russia; USSR; Stalin; populism; nationalism Abstract This article argues that the formation of a mass sense of Russian national identity was a recent, contingent event that first began to take shape under Stalin. Surveying the new literature on Russian nationalism, it contends that elite expressions of "Russianness" and bureaucratic procl...
Article
History textbooks have long played an unusually political role in Russo-Soviet society, serving as a mechanism for indoctrination from above and a metaphor for authoritarian heavy-handedness for those below. If texts by N. M. Karamzin and D. I. Ilovaiskii epitomized this tension during the 19th and early 20th centuries, they were replaced during th...
Article
"Political Humor under Stalin" is an anthology of jokes, wisecracks, and satire from the Soviet 1930s and 40s that provides a glimpse of everyday dissembling and dissent in one of the modern world s most repressive societies. More than merely a joke book, it offers no less than a folkloric counter-narrative to the official history of the USSR, as w...
Article
Full-text available
Focusing on a number of historical and literary personalities who were regarded with disdain in the aftermath of the 1917 revolution—figures such as Peter the Great, Ivan the Terrible, Alexander Pushkin, Leo Tolstoy, and Mikhail Lermontov—Epic Revisionism tells the fascinating story of these individuals’ return to canonical status during the dark...
Chapter
One of the earliest professionally-trained Marxist historians to be associated with the Russian revolutionary movement, M.N. Pokrovsky was enormously influential as a teacher, pedagogue and scholar. He was also a prominent administrator, serving as Deputy Commissar of the Enlightenment and head of the Communist Academy and Institute of the Red Prof...
Book
Focusing on a number of historical and literary personalities who were regarded with disdain in the aftermath of the 1917 revolution-figures such as Peter the Great, Ivan the Terrible, Alexander Pushkin, Leo Tolstoy, and Mikhail Lermontov-Epic Revisionism tells the fascinating story of these individuals' return to canonical status during the darkes...
Article
Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 6.1 (2005) 187-204 Debates over the nature of official antisemitism during the last decade of Stalin's life have long occupied a prominent place in scholarship concerning 20th-century Russian history. Particularly controversial have been rumors of a plan for the deportation of Soviet Jews that i...
Chapter
In 1956, N. S. Khrushchev denounced Stalin's cult of personality as a psychosis having little connection to Soviet ideology as a whole. Arguing that the cult ‘took on such monstrous proportions because Stalin himself supported the glorification of his own person, using all available methods,’ Khrushchev illustrated his contention with reference to...
Article
Journal of Cold War Studies 7.3 (2005) 196-197 In September 1943, Josef Stalin invited three hierarchs from the Russian Orthodox Church to the Kremlin to discuss the future of the faith. According to one account, Metropolitan Sergii was unsure whether to wear church vestments to the meeting and decided in the end to wear civilian clothes instead. S...
Article
Journal of Cold War Studies 6.3 (2004) 172-174 The exigencies of war in the days and weeks following Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941 forced Soviet ideologists to augment traditional Marxist-Leninist propaganda with more populist rallying calls. Although many of these new appeals were designed to resonate with ordinary Russians' relig...
Article
Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 5.3 (2004) 543-560 Over a decade of turmoil in the breakaway republic of Chechnya has given rise to an extensive new body of literature on the subject. Much of this material focuses on the Russian Federation's campaign against the self-proclaimed Chechen Republic of Ichkeria and the poorly funde...
Article
The public denunciation of M.N. Pokrovskii on 27 January 1936, epitomised a major Soviet ideological shift under way from the 1920s’ focus on materialist internationalism to the late 1930s’ tendency toward russocentric statism. Many scholars — most notably M.V. Nechkina ‐ have argued that this campaign was orchestrated by I.V. Stalin. Archival mate...

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