David Beauchesne

David Beauchesne
Laval University | ULAVAL

Doctor of Philosophy
Postdoctoral researcher

About

24
Publications
8,881
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161
Citations

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
The productivity of marine ecosystems and the services they provide to humans are largely dependent on complex interactions between prey and predators. These are embedded in a diverse network of trophic interactions, resulting in a cascade of events following perturbations such as species extinction. The sheer scale of oceans, however, precludes th...
Article
Full-text available
The St. Lawrence is a vast and complex socio-ecological system providing a wealth of services that sustain numerous economic sectors. This ecosystem is subject to significant human pressures that overlap and potentially interact with climate-driven environmental changes. Our objective in this paper was to systematically characterize the distributio...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating the effects of multiple stressors on ecosystems is becoming increasingly vital with global changes. The role of species interactions in propagating the effects of stressors, although widely acknowledged, has yet to be formally explored. Here, we conceptualise how stressors propagate through food webs and explore how they affect simulated...
Presentation
Full-text available
Anthropogenic influence is a widespread phenomenon affecting coastal ecosystems, the majority of which bears various cooccurring human activities. The exposure and vulnerability of ecological communities and habitats to multiple human activities are promising indicators of the state of coastal benthic ecosystem worldwide. In this study, we develope...
Article
Full-text available
The estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence (EGSL), eastern Canada form a vast inland sea that is subjected to numerous anthropogenic pressures. Management tools are needed to detect and quantify their effect on benthic communities. The aims of this study are to analyze the spatial distribution of epibenthic communities in the EGSL and quantify the im...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) have inhabited coastal areas, the seas, and remote islands for millennia, and developed place-based traditional ancestral knowledge and diversified livelihoods associated with the biocultural use of marine and coastal ecosystems. Through their cultural traditions, customary wise practices, and holist...
Poster
Full-text available
Global changes are creating intricate stress exposure regimes that induce unpredictable environmental effects permeating entire ecological communities by way of species interactions. The role of species and their interactions in mediating the effects of multiple disturbances on food webs remains understudied. Experimental and in situ approaches pro...
Article
Full-text available
In order to help safeguard biodiversity from global changes, the Convention on Biological Diversity developed a Strategic Plan for Biodiversity for the period 2011-2020 that included a list of twenty specific objectives known as the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. With the end of that timeframe in sight, and despite major advancements in biodiversity c...
Chapter
Full-text available
Cumulative potential impacts of the stress factors associated with human activities on the St. Lawrence marine ecosystem BY Photo: Pixabay 135 / 134 /-Human activities deriving from the occupation of the shores of the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence induce stress factors for marine organisms.-The effects on the environment and the organisms of...
Poster
Full-text available
A regional assessment of cumulative impacts is required for the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence to facilitate ecosystem based management supported by evidence. The only currently available assessment was performed at the global scale using 19 drivers of anthropogenic stressors such as fisheries and pollution. While valuable, certain datasets inclu...
Presentation
Full-text available
Describing environmental and anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem change (e.g. hypoxia and fisheries) is largely relying on simplistic metrics that ignore dependencies and the potentially convoluted propagation of effects through complex ecological networks. While informative, such approaches are hardly conducive to robust inference on the impacts of...
Poster
Full-text available
Gathering data for large scale, systematic research initiatives such as regional multi-stressor analyses can be a very challenging - not to say painful - process. On one hand, there is an overwhelming wealth of data available, while on the other hand, some required data remain largely unavailable or inaccessible. Coupled with political intricacies,...
Poster
Full-text available
Exhaustively describing the complex nature of ecological interaction networks is a challenging task even under ideal conditions. When confronted with data-poor environments and large scales of analyses, the task becomes even more daunting. Network-level descriptors are thus largely ignored for practical applications, even though we recognize the im...
Article
Full-text available
Large networks of ecological interactions, such as food webs, are complex to characterize, be it empirically or theoretically. The former requires exhaustive observations, while the latter generally requires ample data to be validated. We therefore wondered whether readily available data, namely empirically described interactions in a variety of ec...
Presentation
Full-text available
Large networks of ecological interactions are complex to characterize, be it empirically or theoretically. We therefore wondered whether readily available data could be used to predict species interactions in data deficient ecosystems. To test this, we used an unsupervised machine learning method with empirical pairwise interactions datasets to pre...
Article
Full-text available
L’intensification de l’empreinte humaine dans l’estuaire et le golfe du Saint-Laurent impose une planification systémique de l’exploitation des ressources marines. Une évaluation régionale des impacts cumulés dans le Saint-Laurent demeure pourtant encore attendue. Un nombre important d’activités (p. ex. transport maritime, pêche, aquaculture) carac...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster presentation describing my thesis project on the evaluation of the impact of multiple stressors on the structure of communities, defined through biotic interactions, in the estuary and the gulf of St. Lawrence in eastern Canada. Available in French and in English.
Article
Full-text available
Although prey species typically respond to the most limiting factors at coarse spatiotemporal scales while addressing biological requirements at finer scales, such behaviour may become challenging for species inhabiting human altered landscapes. We investigated how woodland caribou, a threatened species inhabiting North-American boreal forests, mod...
Thesis
Full-text available
As human encroachment in natural habitats increases ubiquitously, understanding its impacts on wildlife is crucial. We investigated the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances (i.e. clearcuts and roads) on the movements of the woodland caribou, a threatened species inhabiting the highly managed southern fringe of the boreal forest. We used GPS teleme...
Article
Full-text available
Le caribou (Rangifer tarandus) est une espèce particulièrement sensible aux perturbations anthropiques. En utilisant un cadre conceptuel basé sur les différentes échelles biologiques de réponse à une perturbation, nous présentons une revue des connaissances actuelles sur les impacts des routes, chemins et sentiers sur plusieurs facettes de l'écolog...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The intensification of the human footprint in marine ecosystems imposes the use of a systematic planning approach for the use of marine resources. There is, however, currently little knowledge on how multiple stressors interact to affect the integrity of ecosystem structure and functions. My PhD project focuses on evaluating cumulative anthropogenic impacts on the structure of the communities of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence in eastern Canada. The specific goals of my thesis are to: 1. Evaluate cumulative impacts on the ecosystems of the St. Lawrence, 2. Characterize the spatial structure of the communities of the St. Lawrence, 3. Evaluate the vulnerability of biological communities to multiple stressors, and 4. Evaluate cumulative impacts on the communities of the St. Lawrence from the cartography of stressors (Obj. 1) and communities (Obj. 2), as well as the vulnerability of communities to multiple stressors (Obj 3). My project aims at evaluating how multiple stressors interact to directly or indirectly affect interacting species. My ultimate objective is to support a shift towards a more proactive and holistic way of managing marine ecosystems, which also closely correlates with the process of establishing protected areas.