David Banisar

David Banisar

Juris Doctor

About

35
Publications
63,973
Reads
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558
Citations
Introduction
David Banisar is a human and information rights lawyer in London, UK focusing on anti-corruption, development and environment. He specialises in freedom of information, freedom of expression, whistleblowing, and privacy. Previously he was Senior Legal Counsel for ARTICLE 19, Deputy Director of Privacy International, a research fellow at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and a co-founder and Policy Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, DC.
Additional affiliations
October 2009 - August 2022
ARTICLE 19
Position
  • Senior Legal Counsel
May 2002 - September 2010
University of Leeds
Position
  • Visiting Research Fellow
September 2001 - May 2002
Harvard University
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
September 1990 - May 1993
The Catholic University of America
Field of study
  • Law and Public Policy

Publications

Publications (35)
Chapter
Full-text available
Whistleblowing is a key tool in fighting corruption. By promising that their rights will be protected, employees and others who are familiar with the inner workings of an organisation and are in position to see when corruption occurs, will feel more willing to expose those problems to those who are in a position to remedy it, or more generally to t...
Article
Full-text available
The right to privacy and the right to information are both essential human rights in the modern information society. For the most part, these two rights complement each other in holding governments accountable to individuals. But there is a potential conflict between these rights when there is a demand for access to personal information held by gov...
Article
Full-text available
In responding to the COVID-19 outbreak, many governments have taken measures that limit access to information held by public bodies relating to the pandemic and other crucial areas of public interest. For many of those governments, ensuring public access to information is often not seen as important or as a priority because public functions and ser...
Poster
Full-text available
Nearly 140 countries and independently governed jurisdictions and territories around the world have now adopted comprehensive data protection/privacy laws to protect personal data held by private and public bodies. Another 30 countries and jurisdictions including India, Mongolia, Nigeria, Iran, and Indonesia have pending bills or initiatives. The...
Data
Over 100 countries and independent jurisdictions and territories around the world have now adopted comprehensive data protection/privacy laws to protect personal data held by private and public bodies. Around 40 countries and jurisdictions have pending bills or initiatives. The laws in these countries apply to personal information held in both ele...
Data
National Right to Information Laws, Regulations and Initiatives 2017 Nearly 120 countries around the world have adopted national right to information laws or national ordinances/regulations. This map shows all the countries that have adopted laws, regulations or have pending efforts. Updated September 2017 to include Kenya, Tanzania, East Timor, M...
Poster
Full-text available
Approximately 100 countries around the world have adopted national right to information laws or national ordinances/regulations. This map shows all the countries that have adopted laws, regulations or have pending efforts. Updated March 2013.
Data
Over 100 countries and independent jurisdictions and territories around the world have now adopted comprehensive data protection/privacy laws to protect personal data held by private bodies. Over 40 countries and jurisdictions have pending bills or initiatives. The laws in these countries apply to personal information held in both electronic and p...
Poster
Full-text available
Over 90 countries and jurisdictions around the world have adopted comprehensive data protection/privacy laws to protect personal data held by both governments and private companies. This map shows which countries have adopted laws or have pending initiatives to adopt one. The new version now includes small jurisdictions and island states. Note: Th...
Chapter
Full-text available
The bulk releases of internal information about US military and foreign affairs by WikiLeaks were a shock to American officials in their scope and scale. However, so far, despite the public anger showed by the US government and immediate action against the lone alleged leaker, no new legislation restricting free expression rights has been adopted b...
Article
Full-text available
The rights of access to information, public participation, and access to justice are essential to sustainable development. The 1992 Rio Declaration provided for these rights in Principle 10 and Agenda 21 moved them into reality in many countries. Now renewed commitment is needed for the full implementation of the rights in all countries.The 2012 Su...
Article
Full-text available
Countries the world over are gradually embracing the ICT revolution. Although development is desired and necessary, and ICT at the pivot of much of the development processes, the new advancements in the ICT arena have come with both benefits and problems for the enjoyment of human rights. This article is a brief primer on emerging issues relating t...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of anti-terrorism legislation and efforts since 2001 has raised new challenges for the media's ability to collect and disseminate information. Nearly all European nations have adopted new laws in that period.The role of international bodies including the Council of Europe and the European Union (EU) has been more negative than positive...
Article
Full-text available
The first ever comprehensive global study of protection of journalists' sources has found that there is widespread legal recognition of the right around the world. Approximately 100 countries have adopted sources protection laws which allow journalists to keep promises to confidential sources that their identities will not be revealed. The recognit...
Article
Full-text available
Freedom of information is an essential right for every person. It allows individuals and groups to protect their rights. It is an important guard against abuses, mismanagement and corruption. It can also be beneficial to governments themselves – openness and transparency in the decision-making process can improve citizen trust in government actions...
Chapter
Full-text available
The information age has made information more readily available to citizens than ever before though the internet and other technologies. This has been complimented by efforts in many countries to adopt laws promoting legal rights to information. However, there are still considerable barriers to obtaining information in many countries and efforts to...
Article
Full-text available
NOT ALL INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IS A DANGEROUS THING. IT HAS BEEN INSTRUMENTAL IN THE SPREAD OF FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACTS AND RIGHTS OF ACCESS ACROSS THE WORLD
Article
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In the last decade, governments around the world have become increasingly more transparent. Over 40 countries now have comprehensive laws to facilitate access to state records; over 30 more are in the process of enacting such legislation. Although freedom of information laws have existed since 1776, when Sweden passed its Freedom of the Press Act,...
Article
National governments are working to tame activity on the Internet. They have worked steadily to extend control over online activities that they believe affect their interests, even when the activities occur outside their borders. These usually involve what governments regard as their domain: protecting public order, enforcing commercial laws, and,...
Article
Full-text available
Auto makers are responsible for the safety and reliability of their cars. So why shouldn't software makers be held responsible for buggy computer programs?
Article
In the US, the rapid development of Internet technologies, combined with a tack of legal protections for privacy, is turning the Internet into the World Wide Watcher. Controversy is growing but there is little action from government `You have zero privacy -get over it!' Scott McNealy, CEO, Sun Microsystems.
Article
Full-text available
Privacy is a fundamental human right recognized in all major international treaties and agreements on human rights. Nearly every country in the world recognizes privacy as a fundamental human right in their constitution, either explicitly or implicitly. Most recently drafted constitutions include specific rights to access and control one's personal...
Article
Full-text available
Since the end of World War II, the United States government has attempted to limit the development and availability of publicly available cryptography in order to preserve and enhance its ability to monitor communications anywhere in the world. This effort had been led by the super-secretive National Security Agency (NSA). In the last decade, it ha...
Article
Full-text available
Privacy is a fundamental human right recognized in all major international treaties and agreements on human rights. Nearly every country in the world recognizes privacy as a fundamental human right in their constitution, either explicitly or implicitly. Most recently drafted constitutions include specific rights to access and control one's personal...
Article
As the Internet and other communications systems reach further into everyday lives, national security, law enforcement and individual privacy have become perilously intertwined. Governments want to restrict the free flow of information; software producers are seeking ways to ensure consumers are not bugged from the very moment of purchase
Chapter
There are numerous laws in the United States governing the privacy of personal information, including medical records. Many of these laws also mandate that the security of records is also ensured.
Working Paper
Full-text available
The explosion of telecommunications services has improved the ability for human rights groups to disseminate information worldwide. New telephone, facsimile and computer communications have created opportunities for human rights groups to improve organizing and to promote human rights faster and at a lower cost than ever before. However, these new...
Article
The two sides in the conflict for encryption control are described. In the first camp are law-enforcement and intelligence agencies-the National Security Agency and the FBI-who wish to use wire surveillance as a tool to combat crime, primarily narcotics, but also industrial espionage and anything that threatens national security. In the second camp...

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