David Baglietto-Vargas

David Baglietto-Vargas
University of Malaga | UMA · Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics and Physiology

PhD

About

90
Publications
20,001
Reads
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3,185
Citations
Citations since 2017
49 Research Items
2285 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
Additional affiliations
June 2013 - October 2015
University of California, Irvine
Position
  • Research Assistant
June 2001 - February 2009
University of Malaga
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (90)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Increased circulating glucocorticoids are features of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and increased glucocorticoids accelerate the accumulation of AD pathologies. Here, we analyzed the effects of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU486) in the 3xTg-AD mouse model at an age where hippocampal damage leads to h...
Article
Full-text available
Patients affected by diabetes show an increased risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD). Similarly, patients with AD show impaired insulin function and glucose metabolism. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms connecting these two disorders are still not well understood. Herein, we investigated the microtubule-associated protein tau as a n...
Article
Despite intensive research efforts over the past few decades, the mechanisms underlying the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remain unknown. This fact is of major concern because the number of patients affected by this medical condition is increasing exponentially and the existing treatments are only palliative in nature and offer no d...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that impairs memory and other cognitive functions in the elderly. The social and financial impacts of AD are overwhelming and are escalating exponentially as a result of population aging. Therefore, identifying AD-related risk factors and the development of more efficacious therapeutic...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory loss, cognitive decline, and devastating neurodegeneration, not only as a result of the extracellular accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and intracellular accumulation of tau, but also as a consequence of the dysfunction and loss of synapses. Although significant advances have been made in...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) constitutes the most prominent form of dementia among elderly individuals worldwide. Disease modeling using murine transgenic mice was first initiated thanks to the discovery of heritable mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins (PS) genes. However, due to the repeated failure of translational applicatio...
Article
Most age‐associated neurodegenerative disorders involve the aggregation of specific proteins within the nervous system, as occurs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent evidence indicates that Aβ can misfold and aggregate into seeds that structurally corrupt native proteins, mimicking a prion‐like process of template protein corruption or seeding. In...
Article
Background: Most Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases are sporadic and late-onset, yet nearly all existing mouse AD models harbor pathogenic mutations, rendering them better representations of familial autosomal-dominant forms of the disease. As a foundational step to model late-onset AD (LOAD), we generated and analyzed knock-in mice that express wildt...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is conceptualized as a synaptic failure disorder in which loss of glutamatergic synapses is a major driver of cognitive decline. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies aimed at regenerating synapses may represent a promising approach to mitigate cognitive deficits in AD patients. At present, no disease-modifying drugs exist for...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by initial memory impairments that progress to dementia. In this sense, synaptic dysfunction and loss have been established as the pathological features that best correlate with the typical early cognitive decline in this disease. At the histopathological level, post...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes progressive age-related defects in memory and cognitive function and has emerged as a major health and socio-economic concern in the US and worldwide. To develop effective therapeutic treatments for AD, we need to better understand the neural mechanisms by which AD causes memory loss and cognitive deficits. Here we e...
Article
Full-text available
Mouse models of human diseases are invaluable tools for studying pathogenic mechanisms and testing interventions and therapeutics. For disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease in which numerous models are being generated, a challenging first step is to identify the most appropriate model and age to effectively evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Here...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) causes progressive age-related defects in memory and cognitive function, and has emerged as a major health and socio-economic concern in the US and worldwide. To develop effective therapeutic treatments for AD, we need to better understand the neural mechanisms by which AD causes memory loss and cognitive deficit...
Article
Full-text available
NUTRICIÓN Diabetes 46 D esde el siglo XX, en los países occi-dentales se está viviendo una evolu-ción vertiginosa hacia la hoy llamada sociedad digital o de la información. Sin duda, gracias al desarrollo de la tecnología digital e inalámbrica podemos teletrabajar, o contactar con nuestros seres queridos desde cualquier parte del mundo, todo a golp...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cases are late-onset and occur sporadically, however most mouse models of the disease harbor pathogenic mutations, rendering them better representations of familial autosomal-dominant forms of the disease. Here, we generated knock-in mice that express wildtype human Aβ under control of the mouse App locus. R...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting over 45 million people worldwide. Transgenic mouse models have made remarkable contributions toward clarifying the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations of AD. However, the limited ability of these in vivo models to accurately replicate the biolo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mouse models of human diseases are invaluable tools for studying pathogenic mechanisms and testing interventions and therapeutics. For disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in which numerous models are being generated, a challenging first step is to identify the most appropriate model and age to effectively evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Most age‐associated neurodegenerative disorders involve the aggregation of specific proteins within the nervous system, as occurs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent evidence indicates that Aβ can misfold and aggregate into seeds that structurally corrupt native proteins, mimicking a prion‐like process of template protein corruption or seeding. In...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major cause of dementia, disability, and death in the elderly. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the basic biological mechanisms underlying AD, we do not know how to prevent it, nor do we have an approved disease‐modifying intervention. Both are essential to slow or stop the growth in dementia prevalence....
Article
Full-text available
MicroRNAs play a pivotal role in rapid, dynamic, and spatiotemporal modulation of synaptic functions. Among them, recent emerging evidence highlights that microRNA-181a (miR-181a) is particularly abundant in hippocampal neurons and controls the expression of key plasticity-related proteins at synapses. We have previously demonstrated that miR-181a...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is currently conceptualized as a disease of synaptic failure. Synaptic impairments are robust within the AD brain and better correlate with dementia severity when compared with other pathological features of the disease. Nevertheless, the series of events that promote...
Article
Full-text available
Significance As we age, the innate immune system becomes dysregulated and is characterized by persistent inflammatory responses, and the chronic inflammation mediated by inflammatory receptors represents a key mechanism by which amyloid-beta (Aβ) drives the development of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A crucial aspect of this proce...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal loss is the best neuropathological substrate that correlates with cortical atrophy and dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Defective GABAergic neuronal functions may lead to cortical network hyperactivity and aberrant neuronal oscillations and in consequence, generate a detrimental alteration in memory processes. In this study, using imm...
Article
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Astrocytes are key cells for adequate brain formation and regulation of cerebral blood flow as well as for the maintenance of neuronal metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis and exocytosis, and synaptic transmission. Many of these functions are intrinsically related to neurodegeneration, allowing refocusing on the role of astrocytes in physiologica...
Article
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In early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) spatial navigation is impaired; however, the precise cause of this impairment is unclear. Recent evidence suggests that getting lost is one of the first impairments to emerge in AD. It is possible that getting lost represents a failure to use distal cues to get oriented in space. Therefore, we set out to look for i...
Article
Full-text available
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most devastating diseases that currently affects the aging population. Recent evidence indicates that DM is a risk factor for many brain disorders, due to its direct effects on cognition. New findings have shown that the microtubule‐associated protein tau is pathologically processed in DM; however, it remains un...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory and causes cognitive and psychiatric deficits. New evidences indicate that AD is conceptualized as a disease of synaptic failure, although the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these defects remain to be elucidated. Determining the timing and nature...
Preprint
Full-text available
In early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) spatial navigation is impaired; however, the precise cause of this impairment is unclear. Recent evidence suggests that getting lost in new surroundings is one of the first impairments to emerge in AD. It is possible that getting lost in new surroundings represents a failure to use distal cues to get oriented in sp...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Besides the two main classical features of amyloid beta aggregation and tau-containing neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation plays an important yet unclear role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia are believed to be key mediators of neuroinflammation during AD and responsible for the regulation...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) impairs memory and causes significant cognitive deficits. The disease course is prolonged, with a poor prognosis, and thus exacts an enormous economic and social burden. Over the past two decades, genetically engineered mouse models have proven indispensable for understanding AD pathogenesis, as well as for discovering new...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease is a major neurodegenerative disorder that leads to severe cognitive deficits in the elderly population. Over the past two decades, multiple studies have focused on elucidating the causative factors underlying memory defects in Alzheimer's patients. In this regard, new evidence linking Alzheimer's disease-related pathology and n...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory loss, cognitive decline, and devastating neurodegeneration, not only as a result of the extracellular accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Ab) and intracellular accumulation of tau, but also as a consequence of the dysfunction and loss of synapses. Although significant advances have been made in...
Article
The authors regret an error involving the order of authorship that was missed during the final submission process of our manuscriptrecently published in the Journal Brain Research Bulletin.The updated author list is mentioned above.The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.
Research
In the aged brain, synaptic plasticity and memory show increased vulnerability to impairment by the inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β). In this study, we evaluated the possibility that synapses may directly undergo maladaptive changes with age that augment sensitivity to IL-1β impairment. In hippocampal neuronal cultures, IL-1β increased...
Article
Full-text available
Significance There is a growing understanding that inflammation impairs synaptic plasticity and cognition and that the aged brain has an elevated sensitivity to cognitive impairment by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β). IL-1β activates different pathways via AcP (proinflammatory) or AcPb (prosurvival) IL-1 receptor subunits. This...
Article
Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disease associated with progressive memory and cognitive decline. Previous studies have identified the benefits of cognitive enrichment on reducing disease pathology. Additionally, epidemiological and clinical data suggest that repeated exercise, and cognitive and social enrichment, can improve and/or dela...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease) and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury). One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critica...
Article
Full-text available
The initiation of an inflammatory response is critical to the survival of an organism. However, when inflammation fails to reach resolution, a chronic inflammatory state may occur, potentially leading to bystander tissue damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic inflammation contributes to the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and...
Article
Full-text available
MicroRNAs are a group of small RNAs that regulate diverse cellular processes including neuronal function. Recent studies have shown that dysregulation of specific microRNAs is critically involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most of these reports have focused on microRNAs implicated in alterations of amyloid-β and tau. However, s...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of extracellular beta-amyloid (Abeta) plaques, intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau, progressive synaptic alterations, axonal dystrophies, neuronal loss and the deterioration of cognitive capabilities of patients. However, no effective disease-modifying treatment ha...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal loss is the most common and critical feature of a spectrum of brain traumas and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The capacity to generate new neurons in the central nervous system diminishes early during brain development and is restricted mainly to two brain areas in the mature brain: subventricular zone (SVZ)...
Article
Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with associated memory loss, spatial disorientation, and other psychiatric problems. Cholinergic system dysfunction is an early and salient feature of AD, and enhancing cholinergic signaling with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is currently the primary strategy for improving cogniti...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of extracellular beta-amyloid (Abeta) plaques, intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau, progressive synaptic alterations, axonal dystrophies, neuronal loss and the deterioration of cognitive capabilities of patients. However, no effective disease-modifying treatment has been yet d...
Article
Full-text available
Microglia play an essential role in innate immunity, homeostasis, and neurotropic support in the central nervous system. In Alzheimer disease (AD), these cells may affect disease progression by modulating the buildup of β-amyloid (Aβ) or releasing proinflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic substances. Discovering agents capable of increasing Aβ uptak...
Article
Recent studies on tauopathy animal models suggest that the concomitant expression of the endogenous murine tau delays the pathological accumulation of human tau, and interferes with the disease progression. To elucidate the role of endogenous murine tau in a model with both plaques and tangles, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model by crossin...
Article
Calpains are cysteine proteinases that selectively cleave proteins in response to calcium signals. Exacerbated activation of calpain has been implicated as a major component in the signaling cascade that leads to β-amyloid (Aβ) production and tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we analyzed the potential therapeutic...
Article
Full-text available
Dystrophic neurites associated with amyloid plaques precede neuronal death and manifest early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this work we have characterized the plaque-associated neuritic pathology in the hippocampus of young (4- to 6-month-old) PS1(M146L)/APP(751SL) mice model, as the initial degenerative process underlying functional disturbance...
Article
Full-text available
Tau, the microtubule-associated protein, forms insoluble filaments that accumulate as neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Under physiological conditions, tau regulates the assembly and maintenance of the structural stability of microtubules. In the diseased brain, however, tau becomes abnormally hyperphospho...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is pathologically characterized by tau-laden neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid deposits. Dysregulation of cholinergic neurotransmission has been implicated in AD pathogenesis, contributing to the associated memory impairments; yet, the exact mechanisms remain to be defined. Activating the muscarinic acetylcholine M(1) r...