Dave Giles

Dave Giles
Lattice Training Ltd

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), BA (Hons)

About

42
Publications
47,764
Reads
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729
Citations
Introduction
Dave heads up research and product development at Lattice Training Ltd, a UK based climbing coaching company. His research predominately focuses on sport-specific methods for the assessment of climbing performance and their application. Formally, Dave was a research fellow at the University of Derby (2016 – 2019). His research background is in exercise physiology and psychophysiology, with his PhD focusing on the physiological, psychological and biochemical responses to climbing.
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - January 2017
University of Derby
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Isometric strength of the finger flexors is considered to be one of the main physical determinants of sport rock climbing performance. We set out to determine the test-retest reliability and criterion validity of a low resource maximal isometric finger strength (MIFS) testing protocol that uses a pulley system to add or remove weight to/from a clim...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To assess the validity and reliability of a novel movement performance assessment tool for climbing/sport climbing. Methods: Firstly, salient climbing movement performance factors were identified through an iterative consultation process with ten expert climbing coaches; the resulting Climber’s Movement Performance Assessment Tool (CM-PAT)...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of effective observational analysis in coaching the technical aspects of climbing performance, limited research informs this aspect of climbing coach education. Thus, the purpose of the present research was to explore the feasibility and the utility of a novel methodology, combining eye tracking technology and cued retrospect...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: The fatigue resistance of the finger flexors is known to be a key determinant of climbing performance. This study set out to establish the association between the single all-out assessment of finger flexor critical force (ff-CF) and the impulse above CF (W') on climbing performance (self-reported sport and boulder climbing ability). Meth...
Article
Full-text available
Despite rock climbing's popularity and an increasing number of female participants there is limited anthropometric and performance data for this population. This study compares the characteristics of 55 experienced female climbers, divided into the three categories (lower [ADV-L] and higher advanced [ADV-H] and elite [ELT]) based on self-reported a...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Sport climbing requires high-intensity finger flexor contractions, along with a substantial whole-body systemic oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2) contribution. Although fatigue is often localised to the finger flexors, the role of systemic ̇[Formula: see text]O2 and local aerobic mechanisms in climbing performance remains unclear. As...
Article
Full-text available
Past attempts to define an anaerobic threshold (AnT) have relied upon gas exchange kinetics, lactate testing and field-based evaluations. DFA a1, an index of heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) fractal correlation properties, has been shown to decrease with exercise intensity. The intent of this study is to investigate whether the AnT derived from ga...
Article
Purpose: To examine the validity and reliability of a battery of 10 measures designed to assess the key physiological parameters for successful rock climbing performance. Methods: In phase 1 of the research, an expert panel, using the Delphi method, established a 10-item test battery based on the key determinants of climbing performance. In phas...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the study was to compare the psychophysiological response of climbers of a range of abilities (lower grade to advanced) when ascending identical climbing routes on a climbing wall and a rotating treadwall. Twenty-two female climbers (31.2 ± 9.4 years; 60.5 ± 6.5 kg; 168.6 ± 5.7 cm) completed two identical 18 m climbing trials (graded...
Article
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Forest Bathing, where individuals use mindfulness to engage with nature, has been reported to increase heart rate variability and benefit wellbeing. To date, most Forest Bathing studies have been conducted in Asia. Accordingly, this paper reports the first pragmatic controlled trial of Forest Bathing in the United Kingdom, comparing Forest Bathing...
Article
Full-text available
Recent study points to the value of a non-linear heart rate variability (HRV) biomarker using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA a1) for aerobic threshold determination (HRVT). Significance of recording artefact, correction methods and device bias on DFA a1 during exercise and HRVT is unclear. Gas exchange and HRV data were obtained from 17 partic...
Article
Full-text available
The short-term scaling exponent alpha1 of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA a1), a nonlinear index of heart rate variability (HRV) based on fractal correlation properties, has been shown to steadily change with increasing exercise intensity. To date, no study has specifically examined using the behavior of this index as a method for defining a lo...
Article
Full-text available
Heart rate variability (HRV) measurements via ambulatory monitors have become common. We examined the validity of recording R-R intervals using the Polar V800™ compared to 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG) among middle-aged (44.7±10.1years); overweight to obese (29.8±4.3 kg.m-2) adults (n = 25) with hypertension (132.3±12.2/ 84.3±10.2 mmHg). After r...
Article
Anthocyanin-rich New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) may improve forearm muscle oxygenation and enhance performance in high-level rock climbers. As such, using a double-blind, randomised, cross-over design study, twelve participants performed an oxidative capacity assessment, and two successive exhaustive exercise trials (submaximal forearm muscle cont...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between attention (using two different attention tasks) and self-reported climbing ability while considering potential confounding factors (sex, age, climbing experience, and cardiorespiratory fitness) in a group of experienced climbers. Accuracy of response (AC) and reaction time (RT) f...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of different water immersion temperatures on handgrip performance and haemodynamic changes in the forearm flexors of males and females. Twenty-nine rock-climbers performed three repeated intermittent handgrip contractions to failure with 20 min recovery on three separate laboratory visits. F...
Article
Objective This study aimed to explore parents' attitudes toward the content of their child's packed lunch, school healthy eating policies, and their child's wishes. Furthermore, in this context, it also aimed to explore perceptions of health promotional materials and how these interventions interplayed with issues parents felt were important. Desi...
Article
Purpose: To assess the validity and reliability of a novel movement-performance assessment tool for climbing/sport climbing. Methods: First, salient climbing movement-performance factors were identified through an iterative consultation process with 10 expert climbing coaches; the resulting Climber's Movement Performance Assessment Tool (CM-PAT)...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To determine if the mathematical model used for the estimation of critical force (CF) and the energy store component W' is applicable to intermittent isometric muscle actions of the finger flexors of rock climbers, using a multi-session test. As a secondary aim, the agreement of estimates of CF and W' from a single-session test were also d...
Presentation
Full-text available
Rock climbing requires repeated isometric contractions of the finger flexors, responsible for flexion of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints. These contractions cause regular periods of ischemia in the forearms; the extent of this ischemia and the subsequent recovery from it has been shown to differentiate ability groups of rock clim...
Poster
Full-text available
METHODS Onsight climbing ability and BMD using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Figure 1 and 2) were assessed in five rock climbers (4 females). PURPOSE To analyze the changes in BMD following 10-years of rock climbing. RESULTS After 10-years, mean climbing ability was significantly higher in 2015 vs 2005 for all climbers (7b vs 7a, p=0.025)...
Article
This study examined differences in the oxygenation kinetics and strength and endurance characteristics of boulderers and lead sport climbers. Using near infrared spectroscopy, 13-boulderers, 10-lead climbers, and 10-controls completed assessments of oxidative capacity index and muscle oxygen consumption (mV˙O2) in the flexor digitorum profundus (FD...
Article
Full-text available
Objective The aim of the study was to determine electromyographic activity of the scapula stabilizing muscles in naturally chosen and corrected shoulder positions in typical static climbing postures. Methods Six male participants undertook surface electromyography measurement in four climbing postures for two different shoulder positions. The acti...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Rock climbing performance has been suggested to involve a notable contribution from the aerobic metabolism. Previously it has been shown that forearm oxygenation kinetics can be used to distinguish ability groups and predict red-point sport climbing performance. Currently it is not known if forearm oxygenation kinetics, or a sport specific...
Article
Full-text available
There is a need for standard practice in the collection and processing of RR interval data recorded using heart rate monitors (HRM) in research. This paper assessed the validity of RR intervals and heart rate variability (HRV) data obtained using a HRM during incremental exercise, and artefact correction methods. Eighteen participants completed an...
Article
Full-text available
Rock-climbing performance is largely dependent on the endurance of the forearm flexors. Recently, it was reported that forearm flexor endurance in elite climbers is independent of the ability to regulate conduit artery (brachial) blood flow, suggesting that endurance is not primarily dependent on the ability of the brachial artery to deliver oxygen...
Article
Purpose: The present study aimed to determine if autonomic cardiac modulation was influenced by acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia. Method: Ten healthy male lowland dwellers completed five block-randomised single-blinded, crossed-over acute exposures to a normobaric hypoxic environment, each separated by 24 hours' recovery (20.3%, 17.4%, 14.5%...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alterations in potential lead fall distance on the hormonal responses of rock climbers. Nine advanced female climbers completed two routes whilst clipping all (PRO-all) or half (PRO-½) of the fixed points of protection. Venous blood samples were analysed for total catecholamines, noradrenaline (nor...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: This study examined differences in oxygenation kinetics in the non-dominant and dominant flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) of rock climbers. Methods: Participants consisted of 28 sport climbers with a range of on-sight abilities (6a+ to 8a French Sport). Using near infrared spectroscopy, oxygenation kinetics of the FDP was assessed by ca...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose To assess the validity of RR intervals and short- term heart rate variability (HRV) data obtained from the Polar V800 heart rate monitor, in comparison to an electro- cardiograph (ECG). Method Twenty participants completed an active orthos- tatic test using the V800 and ECG. An improved method for the identi cation and correction of RR inte...
Article
The research base for rock climbing has expanded substantially in the past three decades as worldwide interest in the sport has grown. An important trigger for the increasing research attention has been the transition of the sport to a competitive as well as recreational activity and the potential inclusion of sport climbing in the Olympic schedule...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effect of hand shaking during recovery phases of intermittent testing on the time–forcecharacteristics of performance and muscle oxygenation, and (2) assess inter-individual variability in the time to achieve thetarget force during intermittent testing in rock climbers. Twenty-two participants undertook three fi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Competitive rock climbing places a large physiological stress on the forearm flexors for prolonged periods of time. It has been suggested that higher-level rock climbers have a greater skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in their dominant forearm (flexor digitorum profundus [FDP]) when compared to their lower-level counterparts (Fryer et al., 2015,...
Article
Full-text available
The study aimed to assess the physiological demands of indoor wall climbing in children. Twenty-five children (aged 8–12 years) from a climbing school, with a performance RP (red point) of IV to V+ UIAA (Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme) scale (5.4 to 5.7 YDS [Yosemite Decimal System] and 4a to 5a Sport/French scale), participated...
Article
Full-text available
The sport of rock climbing places a significant physiological and psychological load on participants. Psychophysiological analysis provides a unique insight into affective states arising from the demands of climbing, and the impact that they have on performance. This review provides an overview of climbing psychophysiology research completed to dat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: In an attempt to match alterations in cardiac output during an orthostatic challenge, head up tilt decreases parasympathetic (PNS) and increases sympathetic (SNS) nervous system activity; returning to pre-tilt values on a head down manoeuvre (Yamamoto et al., 1996). Further research has demonstrated reduced orthostatic tolerance with hy...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In 2014 the International Rock Climbing Association agreed to develop a multi-centre trial as an investigation in the sport-specific measurement and evaluation tools for the sport of rock climbing. A battery of 10 tests were developed for validation and reliability assessment. Seven research centres, in Austria, Chile, Czech Republic, France, New Zealand, Spain and United Kingdom are involved in the study. The initial results for the study were presented at the 2016 IRCRA Congress in telluride, CO, USA. Details of the research can be found at www.ircra.rocks.