Darren Bardati

Darren Bardati
Bishop's University · Department of Environmental Studies and Geography

PhD Geography - Natural Resource Management (McGill University); Certificate in Sustainable Food Systems (University of Vermont)

About

16
Publications
2,940
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61
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
30 Citations
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Introduction
Food, water, climate and humans are linked in complex social-ecological systems. Working in, and with, communities of farmers, our research aims to analyse and (co-)construct knowledge about these social-ecological systems for transformative change toward resilience and sustainability

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
The author of this study developed a heuristic technique called “participatory agroecological assessment” for use by smallholder farmers in Malawi to examine their vulnerability to threats due to changing climatic conditions. Rooted in a participatory action research paradigm, the author collected data jointly with Malawian farmers near Chilanga, K...
Article
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This essay explores the rapid upsurge interest in local foods in the Eastern Townships, setting it within the context of the academic literature and other regions of North America. It provides an overview of the broad changes in the regions's food production since settlement in the late eighteenth century to the present, and advances observations a...
Book
Full-text available
Planning, adaptive action and emergency preparedness can help reduce the damage done by rising sea levels, storms, coastal erosion and other impacts of climate change. The damage caused by climate changes affects more than geographical features and infrastructure; it also affects all of the values that people attach to the physical environment. How...
Article
Full-text available
Planning, adaptive action and emergency preparedness can reduce or mitigate losses and associated distress resulting from negative impacts of climate change on small islands. However, adaptation plans and strategies are typically developed using only scientific and economic data. These need to be augmented by data that reflect the social and cultur...
Article
This chapter presents a study, which examined the collaborative decision-making potential for a nature conservation corridor to be established in an existing multiple right-of-way (ROW) that includes two natural gas pipelines and an electrical transmission line. In the rolling hills of rural southern Quebec, where tourism-dependent communities and...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This paper seeks to suggest that the campus environmental audit can become an important tool that synergizes active learning and operations planning and management approaches to promote sustainability on university campuses. Design/methodology/approach The paper presents the author's experiences at Bishop's University with the evolution of...
Article
Full-text available
This article studies the conditions in which the decision-making process for the implantation of a second pipeline in the South Stukely corridor took place. The authors observe how the residents of South Stukely, in their fight to be heard and to conserve their land and its various ecosystems, went from being powerless in front of governments and c...
Article
Full-text available
This paper first highlights the history of boating at Lake Massawippi starting with the first multi-passenger steamers to be launched in the late 1880s to the single-passenger personal watercrafts (PWCs) that appeared in the late 1980s. The findings of a study, based on 430 personal interviews with cottagers and visitors, which sought to measure an...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
How do farmers adapt to a changing climate? How resilient are their systems? What innovations are they testing to make adaptations easier and effective? This study explores farmers' practices in agritourism operators in southern Quebec, small-holder subsistence farmers in Kasungu, Malawi, and wine grape and olive growers in Tuscany, Italy.
Project
Our study aims to examine transitions in farming practices from conventional/industrial methods to more sustainable ones based on the field of agroecology. “Agroecology is a way of redesigning food systems, from the farm to the table, with a goal of achieving ecological, economic, and social sustainability” (Gleissman, 2016, 187). Gleissman suggests that transdisciplinary, participatory, and change-oriented research is needed to examine agroecological transitions. In response, we propose to survey a large number of organic farms in Quebec (n=500+), and interview approximately 30 farmers who are advanced in their transition, in order to examine their successes, challenges, threats, and needs, and to learn from their experiences. The results will serve to build an understanding of what constitutes a successful agroecological transition, and what barriers need to be overcome. Lessons learnt by our study will add to the paucity of findings in the academic literature of agroecological transitions, and can be adapted to other contexts worldwide to help farmers navigate the transition toward sustainable farming.