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Darcy R. Visscher

Darcy R. Visscher
The King's University, Edmonton, Canada · Biology

PhD

About

29
Publications
5,613
Reads
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932
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
448 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
Darcy R. Visscher currently works in the Biology Department at The King's University, Edmonton, Canada. Darcy does research in Evolutionary Biology, Zoology and Ecology.

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
The “ecology of fear” framework was developed to describe the impacts predators have on potential prey and prey populations, outside of consumption/predation (i.e. non-consumptive effects, NCEs). This framework has recently been extended to symbiotic interactions such as host–parasite associations. Although the NCEs of predators and parasites on th...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Canine intestinal parasite prevalence may be influenced by geographical region, age, and health status of the dog. Behaviors such as predation, scavenging, or roaming as well as routine administration of anthelmintics also play a role. The purpose of this study was to evaluate fecal test results using zinc sulfate flotation by centrifu...
Article
The urbanization of environments is a major land use change across the globe that is expected to continue. While the urban environment typically presents wildlife with lethal challenges it may also present new opportunities for species able to behaviourally adapt. White-tailed jackrabbits are a quintessential prairie adapted species, which are unde...
Article
Echinococcus multilocularis is a zoonotic tapeworm, whose metacestode larval stage is the etiological agent for alveolar echinococcosis in humans and is a parasite of emerging concern according to the World Health Organization which is difficult to diagnose and has a case mortality rate of >90% when left untreated. Echinococcus multilocularis requi...
Article
Full-text available
Echinococcus multilocularis, the aetiological agent of human Alveolar Echinococcosis (AE), is transmitted between small mammals and wild or domestic canids. Dogs infected with E. multilocularis can transmit this infection to humans and can themselves be infected with canine AE as dead-end hosts. Whereas E. multilocularis infections in wild hosts an...
Article
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Camera traps are becoming ubiquitous tools for ecologists. While easily deployed, they require human time to organize, review, and classify images including sequences of images of the same individual, and non-target images triggered by environmental conditions. For such cases, we developed an automated computer program, named EventFinder, to reduce...
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Research Highlights: When biotic interactions such as disease alter both the seed production capacity of stands, and seedling survivorship, the relative importance of seed availability versus substrate specificity may alter future regeneration opportunities for plant populations. Background and Objectives: We investigated the importance of disease...
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Full-text available
Animal behaviour is increasingly seen as an important component in maintaining functional connectivity between patches in fragmented landscapes. However, models that explicitly incorporate behavioural trade-offs are rarely applied to landscape planning problems like connectivity. The aim of this study was to explore how state-dependent behaviour in...
Data
Stand alone program to solve the SDP algorithm based on user specified states and state dynamics and to do stochastic simulations based on the solved optimal policy. (EXE)
Data
Example XML configuration file used by the stand alone program to run a user specified scenario. (XML)
Article
Full-text available
Animal behaviour is increasingly seen as an integral component in maintaining connectivity within landscapes. Perceived predation risk causes changes in behaviour, differentially distributing individuals across landscapes, resulting in patchy habitat use. While intuitively these two ecological processes must be linked, they are often investigated i...
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Remote cameras are an increasingly important tool for ecological research. While remote camera traps collect field data with minimal human attention, the images they collect require post-processing and characterization before it can be ecologically and statistically analyzed, requiring the input of substantial time and money from researchers. The n...
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Satiation of predispersal seed predators by mast years has been demonstrated in many intact ecosystems. When disease causes mortality of seed-bearing trees in an ecosystem, the abundance of food sources may alter seed predator behavior and abundance, and the ecosystem services derived from mutualistic seed dispersers. We used the endangered limber...
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Animal populations are regulated by the combined effects of top-down, bottom-up and abiotic processes. Ecologists have struggled to isolate these mechanisms because their effects on prey behaviour, nutrition, security and fitness are often interrelated. We monitored how forage, non-consumptive effects (NCEs), consumptive predation and climatic cond...
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Understanding the distribution of individuals in space is a primary concern to ecologists and managers. With the advent of remote monitoring technology, we have been able to answer where individuals are but we often lack an understanding of why they are located in a particular place from a behavioral perspective. Increasingly, ecologists are becomi...
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Scientists increasingly acknowledge the influence that nonlethal effects of predation have on structuring wildlife-landscape interactions. In landscapes dominated by human activities, wildlife can respond to human disturbance in a similar fashion to the risk of predation. Further, the risk allocation hypothesis suggests that individuals respond mos...
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Recent studies of animal habitat selection are inferring more detail regarding the behavioural mechanisms involved, like functional responses and familiarity effects. Changes in animals’ use or selection of a habitat type with changing availability are commonly interpreted as a functional response in habitat preference. Studies of familiarity infer...
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BioOne (www.bioone.org) is an electronic aggregator of bioscience research content, and the online home to over 160 journals and books published by not-for-profit societies, associations, museums, institutions, and presses. ABSTRACT Animal movement studies regularly use movement states (e.g., slow and fast) derived from remotely sensed locations to...
Article
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Global Positioning System (GPS) collars are increasingly used to study animal movement and habitat use. Measurement error is defined as the difference between the observed and true value being measured. In GPS data measurement error is referred to as location error and leads to misclassification of observed locations into habitat types. This is par...
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Despite its central place in animal ecology no general mechanistic movement model with an emergent home-range pattern has yet been proposed. Random walk models, which are commonly used to model animal movement, show diffusion instead of a bounded home range and therefore require special modifications. Current approaches for mechanistic modeling of...
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Rapid conversion of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) dominated landscapes in western Alberta to a mosaic of successional stand ages has long-term implications for elk populations in the region that have not been fully assessed. We developed stand-level models of forage succession using data from 159 cutblocks to simulate forage and cover availabilit...
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Advances in technology have allowed ecologists to employ remote observations of individual organism's spatial location. These data are used to model species distributions and habitat associations, which inform conservation efforts and management plans. These data are not without error. To illustrate the consequences of not considering measurement e...
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In northern temperate environments, assessments of ungulate winter range in forested ecosystems commonly focus on measuring availability of browse because the dietary proportion of browse is typically high in winter. In many cases, these efforts ignore reductions in browse availability due to snow burial because this effect is difficult to measure....
Article
Full-text available
Global positioning system (GPS) technology has increased the accuracy and efficiency in recording animal locations and has provided data used to parameterize move-ment models. Although numerous studies have investigated the quality and accuracy of location data associated with different brands of GPS collars, none of these studies has investigated...
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Full-text available
Animals may respond to spatial and temporal heterogeneity by altering their movement patterns. The time an animal spends in an area of a given size is termed ȁ8first-passage timeȁ9 and can be used to identify the scales at which different movement processes occur. Using first-passage time and 2-h observations, we identified nested spatial scales re...
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Full-text available
Many species exhibit skewed sex ratios at birth. Here we investigate the relationships between environmental and maternal variables (as surrogates for maternal condition) and foetal sex in African buffalo Syncerus caffer and elephant Loxodonta africana of the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Using logistic regression no significant effect was fo...

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