Danit Ein-Gar

Danit Ein-Gar
Tel Aviv University | TAU · Coller School of Management

Professor

About

20
Publications
10,740
Reads
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365
Citations
Introduction
I am an associate professor at the Marketing Department at Coller School of Management, Tel-Aviv University. My primary research interest is how and why people give to others in need. Giving may take many forms such as monetary donations, volunteerism, free knowledge sharing (i.e. advice giving) and emotional support etc. I am interested in exploring the new platforms of giving in the modern-digital You are welcome to visit my lab: https://thegivinglab.co.il/

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Past research has shown repeatedly that people prefer donating to a single identified human victim rather than to unidentified or abstract donation targets. In the current research we show results countering the identifiable victim effect, wherein people prefer to donate to charitable organizations rather than to an identifiable victim. In a series...
Article
Full-text available
This research examines the joint effect of dispositional self-control and situational involvement on performance in two successive resource-demanding tasks. We demonstrate that being highly involved and having high self-control facilitates high performance in the first task but, contrary to intuition, may jeopardize performance in a second, unexpec...
Article
Full-text available
Virtue products (such as sunscreen lotion and dental floss) promise future benefits and, at the same time, carry immediate and ongoing usage costs. Although consumers acknowledge the benefits of virtue products, they find it difficult to consume them on a daily basis. This research focuses on a key problem in the consumption of virtue products —ong...
Article
Full-text available
This research uncovers a counterintuitive effect of negative information, showing that under specifiable conditions people will be more favorably disposed to a product when a small dose of negative information is added to an otherwise positive description. This effect is moderated by processing effort and presentation order, such that the enhanced...
Article
Full-text available
Many donation-raising platforms request that first-time donors choose the charitable causes they most care about so that future campaign recommendations can best match donors' charitable preferences. While matching charitable campaigns to donors' reported preferences has its benefits, little is known about other effects that choosing charitable cau...
Article
Full-text available
Many charitable organizations offer potential donors the option to choose their donation recipients—suggesting that organizations perceive the availability of such choice as beneficial to donation raising. Building upon research on choice aversion in the context of consumer goods and on the identifiable victim effect in the context of donation‐givi...
Article
Full-text available
Many service providers offer supplementary products related to their ongoing services (e.g., fitness centers offer fitness smartwatches). In seven studies, the authors show that the payment method for such supplementary products (multiple payments vs. a single lump sum) affects customers’ tendency to defect from the provider’s core service. Specifi...
Article
Full-text available
Self-efficacy constitutes a key factor that influences people's inclination to engage in effortful tasks. In this study, we focus on an interesting interplay between two prominent factors known to influence engagement in effortful tasks: the timing of the task (i.e., whether the task is scheduled to take place in the near or distant future) and ind...
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that worksite health promotion (WHP) programmes, and specifically health risk assessment (HRA) surveys and health education workshops, can be effective in enhancing employees’ health. However, 50–75% of employees choose not to participate when offered the opportunity to do so. The reasons for nonparticipation and the characteristi...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals acknowledge the importance of engaging in virtuous behaviors, but find them difficult. Past research suggests that a distant-future focus may result in more commitment. This research demonstrates that, for certain consumers, distant-future execution timing may discourage commitment. Specifically, whereas low self-control consumers are i...
Article
Full-text available
No one likes feeling empty. When people feel empty they seek replenishment, which usually takes the form of increased self-focused behaviors that provide value to the self and decreased other-focused behaviors that provide value to others. This research demonstrates how exposure to the concept of emptiness by simply performing or observing acts of...
Article
Full-text available
We present the Dispositional Self-Control (DSC) Scale, which reflects individuals' tendency to override 2 types of temptations, termed doing wrong and not doing right. We report a series of 5 studies designed to test the reliability and validity of the scale. As hypothesized, high DSC predicts distant future orientation and low DSC predicts deviant...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals process information and make decisions in different ways. Some plan carefully and analyze information systematically, whereas others follow their instincts and do what "feels right." We aimed to deepen our understanding of the meaning of the intuitive versus systematic cognitive styles. Study 1(N=130, 39% female, Mage=24) compared cogni...
Article
The current research examines the non-trivial destructive effect of consumers' motivation on performance. By conceptualizing resource-depletion as a continuous state, a low point of severe depletion from which recovery is less likely to occur is identified. We propose that extreme levels of motivation yield poor performance under depleted states, a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a theoretical model of self-control as a dynamic process. In situations demanding self-control, the indi- vidual experiences one of two types of temptations: Impulsiveness or procrastination, followed by an inner struggle between yielding to and overcoming the temptation. When the individual activates personal resources to overc...

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