Danilo Amaral

Danilo Amaral
Universidade Federal de São Carlos | UFSCar · Departamento de Física, Química e Matemática (DFQM)

Doctor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

About

34
Publications
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259
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Several firefly luciferases eliciting light emission in the yellow-green range of the spectrum and with distinct kinetic properties have been already cloned, sequenced, and characterized. Some of them are currently being applied as analytical reagents and reporter genes for bioimaging and biosensors, and more recently as potential color tuning indi...
Article
Full-text available
During a search for bioluminescent marine annelids around the island of Carrie Bow Cay, Belize, we discovered bioluminescence in the sipunculan worm Nephasoma pellucidum. The identification of N. pellucidum was verified by DNA barcoding of ∼650 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene, using sequences of the same species from previous st...
Article
Bioluminescence in Diptera is found in the Keroplatidae family (Diptera), within Arachnocampininae and Keroplatinae subfamilies, with reported occurrences in Oceania, Eurasia, and Americas. Larvae of Orfelia fultoni, which inhabit stream banks in the Appalachian Mountains, emit the bluest bioluminescence among insects, using it for prey attraction,...
Article
Firefly luciferases usually emit green-yellow bioluminescence at physiological pH values. However, under acidic conditions, in the presence of heavy metals and, at high temperatures they emit red bioluminescence. To understand the structural origin of bioluminescence colors and pH-sensitivity, about 20 firefly luciferases have been cloned, sequence...
Article
Full-text available
Larvae of O. fultoni (Keroplatidae: Keroplatinae), which occur along river banks in the Appalachian Mountains in Eastern United States, produce the bluest bioluminescence among insects from translucent areas associated to black bodies, which are located mainly in the anterior and posterior parts of the body. Although closely related to Arachnocampa...
Article
Full-text available
Blue shining fungus gnats (Diptera) had been long reported in the Waitomo caves of New Zealand (Arachnocampa luminosa Skuse), in stream banks of the American Appalachian Mountains (Orfelia fultoni Fisher) in 1939 and in true spore eating Eurasiatic Keroplatus Bosc species. This current report observes that similar blue light emitting gnat larvae al...
Article
Bioluminescence, the emission of visible light in a living organism, is an intriguing phenomenon observed in different species and environments. In terrestrial organisms, the bioluminescence is observed mainly in beetles of the Elateroidea superfamily (Coleoptera). Several phylogenetic studies have been used different strategies to propose a scenar...
Article
The Malpighian tubules in insects play an essential role in osmoregulation, through the transport of ions during excretion, whereas the fat body is usually associated with the intermediary metabolism. The tubules also are involved in excretion of organic solutes and xenobiotics. However, with the exception of a preliminary transcriptional survey of...
Article
Bioluminescence in the superfamily Elateroidea is produced by specific light organs distributed in different parts of the body depending on the life stage and family. Whereas the luciferin-luciferase system is well known, the molecular control of bioluminescence, the biosynthetic route of luciferin, and the molecular differentiation of photogenic t...
Article
Bioluminescence in Diptera is found in the family Keroplatidae, in the glowworms of the genera Arachnocampa, Orfelia and Keroplatus. Despite belonging to the same family, Arachnocampa spp. and Orfelia fultoni display morphologically and biochemically distinct bioluminescence systems: Arachnocampa spp. produce light by the terminal ends of Malpighia...
Article
The evolutionary and developmental origins of firefly lanterns remain a mystery. In fireflies, the bioluminescent system involves a benzothiazolic luciferin, ATP, a luciferase, and complex lanterns consisting of different tissues including a photogenic one. Whereas the biochemical reaction and the structure of lanterns are quite well known, the evo...
Article
Bioluminescence in beetles is found in the Elateroidea superfamily, which includes Elateridae, Lampyridae, Rhagophthalmidae, and Phengodidae families. Despite sharing the same biochemical system, it is unclear whether the lanterns and the bioluminescent system share a common origin or not. To better understand the molecular differentiation of photo...
Article
Bioluminescent click-beetles display a wide variation of bioluminescence colors ranging from green to orange, including an unusual intra-specific color variation in the Jamaican Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus. Recently, we collected individuals of the Pyrophorus angustus species from the Southern Amazon forest, in Brazil, which displays an orange ligh...
Article
Luminescent termite mounds caused by colonization of the luminescent larvae of the click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans (Costa, 1982) are well reported in Cerrado ecosystems (savannas) in central west Brazil (Costa 1982). Although luminous termite mounds were occasionally reported in the Amazon forest, they have not been studied as extensively....
Poster
Introduction. The bioluminescence mechanism of luciferin-luciferase reaction is the same for the all the bioluminescent families within Elateroidea group, involving oxidation of D-luciferin from ATP catalyzed by homolog luciferases[1]. Among Elateridae a wide bioluminescence color variation was observed among different species, and even among indiv...
Article
The control region (CR) or A + T-rich region in Coleoptera mt genome is poorly characterized, including the Elateroidea bioluminescent species. Here, we provided the first attempt to characterize and compare the structure and organization of the CR of different species within Elateridae. We also revisited some sequenced Coleoptera CR and observed c...
Article
Mitochondrial genome organization in the Elateroidea superfamily (Coleoptera), which include the main families of bioluminescent beetles, has been poorly studied and lacking information about Phengodidae family. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Neotropical Lampyridae (Bicellonycha lividipennis), Phengodidae (Brasilocerus sp.2 and Phrixtoth...
Article
Fungus-gnats of the genus Arachnocampa are unique among bioluminescent insects for displaying blue-green bioluminescence, and are responsible for one of the most beautiful bioluminescence spectacles on the roofs of the Waitomo Caves. Despite morphological studies showing that Arachnocampa larval lanterns involve specialization of the Malpighian tub...
Article
The Malpighian tubules play a key role in insect osmoregulation. Although a transcriptional analysis has been done for the Malpighian tubules in Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera), no functional genomics analysis has yet been carried out for any Coleoptera species. Recently, we constructed a cDNA library from Malpighian tubules of larval Zophobas mo...
Article
Bioluminescence in beetles is found mainly in the Elateroidea superfamily (Elateridae, Lampyridae and Phengodidae). The Neotropical region accounts for the richest diversity of bioluminescent species in the world with about 500 described species, most occurring in the Amazon, Atlantic rainforest and Cerrado (savanna) ecosystems in Brazil. The origi...
Article
Beetle luciferases produce different bioluminescence colors from green to red using the same D-luciferin substrate. Despite many studies on the mechanisms and structural determinants of bioluminescence colors with firefly luciferases, the identity of the emitters as well as the specific active site interactions responsible for bioluminescence color...
Article
Beetle luciferases emit different bioluminescence colors from green to red, however, the structural determinants and mechanisms of spectral modulation are not fully understood. Nno clear relationship between the physical-chemical identity of the luciferin binding site residues and bioluminescence colors was found in different luciferases, and it is...
Article
Full-text available
Bioluminescent click-beetles emit a wide range of bioluminescence colors (λ(Max) = 534-594 nm) from thoracic and abdominal lanterns, which are used for courtship. Only the luciferases from Pyrophorus and Pyrearinus species were cloned and sequenced. The Brazilian Fulgeochlizus bruchi click-beetle, which inhabits the Central-west Cerrado (Savannas),...
Article
Full-text available
Firefly luciferases usually produce bioluminescence in the yellow-green region, with colors in the green and yellow-orange extremes of the spectrum being less common. Several firefly luciferases have already been cloned and sequenced, and site-directed mutagenesis studies have already identified important regions and residues for bioluminescence co...