Danielle de Jonge

Danielle de Jonge
Heriot-Watt University · School of Life Sciences

MSc in Marine Biology

About

8
Publications
1,695
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47
Citations
Introduction
Deep-sea food-webs, ecosystem functioning, and resilience to disturbances. >> PhD researcher in the Deep-Sea Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group of Andrew Sweetman, Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh (UK). >> iAtlantic research Fellow >> MSc in Marine Biology Summa Cum Laude from the University of Groningen. >> Food webs, linear inverse modelling, ecosystem functioning, stability and resilience, biogeochemistry, eDNA and metabarcoding.

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Fundamental insight on predator-prey dynamics in the deep sea is hampered by a lack of combined data on hunting behavior and prey spectra. Deep-sea niche segregation may evolve when predators target specific prey communities, but this hypothesis remains untested. We combined environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding with biologging to assess cephalopo...
Article
Full-text available
Cephalopods are pivotal components of marine food webs, but biodiversity studies are hampered by challenges to sample these agile marine molluscs. Metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) is a potentially powerful technique to study oceanic cephalopod biodiversity and distribution but has not been applied thus far. We present a novel universal pri...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the predicted future demand for critical metals, abyssal plains covered with polymetallic nodules are currently being prospected for deep-seabed mining. Deep-seabed mining will lead to significant sediment disturbance over large spatial scales and for extended periods of time. The environmental impact of a small-scale sediment disturbance wa...
Thesis
The increased interest in polymetallic nodule mining has sparked research into the ecological eects of seabed mining. At the DISCOL experimental area (DEA) a plough harrow was used to mimic polymetallic nodule mining in 1989, and several studies have looked into the ecological effects of this disturbance. However, these studies have mainly focused...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Marine optical imaging has become a major assessment tool in science, policy and public understanding of our seas and oceans. Methodology in this field is developing rapidly, including hardware, software and the ways of their application. The aim of the Marine Imaging Workshop (MIW) is to bring together academics, research scientists and engineers,...
Thesis
The global demand for precious metals used in multi-?‐media gadgets and green technology is rising. However, these metals are increasingly difficult to excavate from terrestrial sources. Our deep seabed still holds a treasure of these metals, which are now technically and economically feasible to mine. One of the deposits prospected for mining is m...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
I visited the conference "From Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems to the Sustainable Exploitation of Massive Sulfide Deposits" in Bergen, Norway (2015) as an undergraduate student in Biology. This short piece of writing published in the newsletter "Deep-Sea Life" is not a summary of talks, but rather my reflections on the discussions that followed.

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I want to remove low molecular weight compounds (LMWC) from a sample through dialysis (MWCO 1 kDa). For both the sample and dialysis solution I am using sterile artificial seawater (i.e. same pH and salinity), and I add freeze-dried organic matter to the sample.
I was wondering if there is a risk of adding too much sample, so that the difference in concentration between the sample and dialysis solution becomes too large and might damage the pores of the dialysis tubing?
Guidance from personal experience of relevant literature is much appreciated!

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Comparing carbon fluxes, food web characteristics, and food web stability of abyssal ecosystems after varying degrees of benthic disturbance.
Project
Impacts of deep sea mining for manganese nodules on microbial communities and activities in the DISCOL area. An area that was disturbed 26 years ago is investigated to study long-term effects of deep sea mining on microbiological and biogeochemical aspects.