Daniella Bar-Yosef

Daniella Bar-Yosef
Tel Aviv University | TAU · The Steinhardt Museum of Natural History

PhD

About

93
Publications
57,157
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,706
Citations
Introduction
Daniella Bar-Yosef currently works at the The Steinhardt Museum of Natural History, Tel Aviv University. Daniella does research in Archaeology of molluscs and beads

Publications

Publications (93)
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic resources and especially molluscs and fish are encountered from the Lower Palaeolithic. In the Levant, shellfishing and the fishing of marine species began in the Early Natufian (ca. 15ka BP). Fish and mollusc exploitation before and during the Neolithic period, as proxies for interaction between humans and the marine environment, enhance o...
Article
Shells found at the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B site of Yiftahel reflect various aspects of the cultic, social, and economic life at the site. Taxonomically, the assemblage is typical to sites in the Mediterranean climatic zone, dominated by Mediterranean bivalves with several local gastropods and a few specimens originating from the Red Sea. This comp...
Chapter
Full-text available
Shells in general, and marine shells in particular, are conspicuously abundant at the EPPNB site of Nesher-Ramla and had a central role in the activities taking place at the site and in the lives of the people using it. Land snails most probably occurred naturally at the site while freshwater shells were brought inadvertently or purposefully as ado...
Article
Routine quarrying activity at the Nesher-Ramla Quarry, in the Judean Lowlands, Israel, has recently exposed a new Early Holocene archaeological site located in a small natural sinkhole, one of many dolines scattered in the area, dated to the Early Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (EPPNB). It is the first site of this period to be uncovered in the narrow str...
Article
This paper presents ndings from the rst season of excavations conducted at the mountain-top site of Naḥal Roded 110, located in the southern Negev Desert near Eilat, Israel. Both radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence date the site to the Late Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (LPPNB, late 8th millennium BC). Palaeoenvironmental data from pollen a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Beads made of mollusc shells form an integral part of modern humans’ material culture. A survey of the available data from Middle Palaeolithic sites in Africa, Europe and the Levant demonstrates the onset of perforated shell beads beginning around 120 ka and a preference for bivalves such as Glycymeris and gastropods such as Nassariids. The possibl...
Article
Full-text available
Glycymeris shell beads found in Middle Palaeolithic sites are understood to be artifacts collected by modern humans for symbolic use. In Misliya Cave, Israel, dated to 240-160 ka BP, Glycymeris shells were found that were neither perforated nor manipulated; nevertheless , transportation to the cave is regarded as symbolic. In about 120 ka BP at Qaf...
Poster
The poster is available online at EGU website: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2020/EGU2020-19782.html | Particle flows animations are available at SaRoCy's website: http://sarocy.cut.ac.cy/news/particles-flow-animations/ | Maritime connectivity between Cyprus and other Eastern Mediterranean coastal regions on the mainland constitutes a...
Article
Full-text available
The Besor is the largest drainage basin in the Negev desert encompassing variable landscapes and a range of ecological zones. The dry riverbed, a salient feature in the landscape, has been used for thousands of years as a major route crossing from the central Negev Highlands to the coastal plain. Although the lower Besor drainage basin has been the...
Article
A well-preserved sequence of Early Upper Paleolithic (EUP) occupations has been revealed in the past decade in Manot Cave, the studies of which shed light on the cultural dynamics and subsistence patterns and paleoenvironment. Most intriguing is the series of overlying Levantine Aurignacian occupation layers, exposed near the entrance to the cave....
Article
Full-text available
Over the last two decades, much of the recent efforts dedicated to the Levantine Middle Paleolithic has concentrated on the role of open-air sites in the settlement system in the region. Here focus on the site of 'Ein Qashish as a cases study. Located in present-day northern Israel, the area of this site is estimated to have been >1300 m 2 , of whi...
Article
Over the last two decades, much of the recent efforts dedicated to the Levantine Middle Paleolithic has concentrated on the role of open-air sites in the settlement system in the region. Here focus on the site of 'Ein Qashish as a cases study. Located in present-day northern Israel, the area of this site is estimated to have been >1300 m 2 , of whi...
Article
Full-text available
This is a special issue on personal ornaments in early prehistory. There are 12 contributions: • Bar-Yosef Mayer, D.E. and Bosch, M.D.: Humans’ Earliest Personal Ornaments: An Introduction • Steele, T.E., Álvarez-Fernández, E., and Hallett-Desguez, E.: A Review of Shells as Personal Ornaments during the African Middle Stone Age • Bosch, M.D., Buck,...
Article
Full-text available
Excavations at the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B ritual site of Naḥal Roded 110 in the Southern Negev, Israel, have revealed evidence—unique to this region—for on-site flint knapping and abundant raptor remains. Full text available at: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/investigations-at-nahal-roded-110-a-late-neolithic-ritual-sit...
Article
Full-text available
Humans’ transition from a foraging economy to agriculture in the Neolithic of the Levant brought with it the first use of stone beads. These came in many colours and shapes, with a variety of green minerals dominating. Beads in white, red, yellow, brown, and black colours had been used previously, thus the occurrence of green beads was related to t...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter focuses on a region that encompasses the Gulf of Zula and Buri Peninsula along the Red Sea coast of Eritrea. Middle and Later Stone Age (LSA) sites uncovered from the area shed light on the exploitation of marine and coastal resources that sustained human populations during these periods. Two sites with Middle Stone Age (MSA) remains,...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation given in the UISPP conference, Paris 2018 Session: XIII-2. Prehistoric Personal Adornment in Social and Economic Context. Clair Heckel and Solange Rigaud.
Article
Full-text available
To date, the earliest modern human fossils found outside of Africa are dated to around 90,000 to 120,000 years ago at the Levantine sites of Skhul and Qafzeh. A maxilla and associated dentition recently discovered at Misliya Cave, Israel, was dated to 177,000 to 194,000 years ago, suggesting that members of the Homo sapiens clade left Africa earlie...
Poster
Full-text available
The only evidence of Neolithic presence (EPPNB) at the Nesher-Ramle site-complex were found in an ancient sink-hole, which was filled with sediment and artefacts during the neolithic period. Among other finds from this site shells are surprisingly common. A rich assemblage of land, freshwater and marine shells were found, some artificially perforat...
Article
Full-text available
The timing of archeological industries in the Levant is central for understanding the spread of modern humans with Upper Paleolithic traditions. We report a high-resolution radiocarbon chronology for Early Upper Paleolithic industries (Early Ahmarian and Levantine Aurignacian) from the newly excavated site of Manot Cave, Israel. The dates confirm t...
Book
Full-text available
Details Beads, beadwork, and personal ornaments are made of diverse materials such as shell, bone, stones, minerals, and composite materials. Their exploration from geographical and chronological settings around the world offers a glimpse at some of the cutting edge research within the fast growing field of personal ornaments in humanities’ past....
Article
The incipient human population of Cyprus came from Southwest Asia in the Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene. In the Neolithic of Southwest Asia mollusk shells were commonly used as personal ornaments that were made mostly of Mediterranean, and to a lesser extent, Red Sea species. A comparison of the shell ornaments found in Neolithic sites of Cyprus e...
Article
Full-text available
The late Middle Palaeolithic (MP) settlement patterns in the Levant included the repeated use of caves and open landscape sites. The fossil record shows that two types of hominins occupied the region during this period—Neandertals and Homo sapiens. Until recently, diagnostic fossil remains were found only at cave sites. Because the two populations...
Article
Seasonal δ¹³C and δ¹⁸O data are presented from 14 Unio sub-fossil shells unearthed at the archaeological site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey, spanning the occupation period ca. 9150–8000 cal years BP. The shells likely lived in the small lakes/wetlands around the site before being gathered and taken to Çatalhöyük. Wet-dry seasonal cycles are clear...
Article
Full-text available
Recent archaeological evidence from Cyprus shows that humans first arrived on the island at around 12,000 calibrated years BP. Visits to Cyprus intensified and resulted in settlement of the island during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A beginning around 11,000 cal BP. Later occupations of the Cypro Pre Pottery Neolithic B from around 10,500 to 9000 cal...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decade, research has shown that in Middle Palaeolithic sites in both Africa and Eurasia, members of the genus Nassarius were the preferred mollusks selected for use as beads. Species of this genus continued to be exploited as part of the shell bead corpus during the Upper Palaeolithic as well as in later periods. The choice of N. gibb...
Article
Full-text available
Use-wear analysis applied to two carnelian beads from Nahal Hemar Cave, southern Israel, and dated to the Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period, revealed a manufacturing procedure that corresponds to genuine lapidary technologies of contemporary traditional societies. Based on ethnographic observations combined with experiments in working carnelian...
Article
Full-text available
A key event in human evolution is the expansion of modern humans of African origin across Eurasia between 60 and 40 thousand years (kyr) before present (bp), replacing all other forms of hominins. Owing to the scarcity of human fossils from this period, these ancestors of all present-day non-African modern populations remain largely enigmatic. Here...
Article
Full-text available
The Chalcolithic period in the southern Levant (ca. 4500-3800 B.C.E.) witnessed a few major social, economic, and cultural developments in comparison to preceding Neolithic cultures (e.g. Rowan and Golden 2009). Sedentary populations increased greatly and settlements flourished in areas previously only sparsely occupied, including the northern Nege...
Article
Full-text available
The site of Beisamoun is located on the western side of the marshes of the former Hula Lake in the upper Jordan Valley, in the northern part of the Southern Levant. It is known as a major Middle and Late Pre-Pottery Neolithic B settlement from excavations and surveys undertaken by A. Assaf, J. Perrot and M. Lechevallier and colleagues up to the 197...
Article
Full-text available
This study is an attempt to develop a comprehensive typology of the earliest stone bead assemblages in the southern Levant from Late Natufian and Neolithic sites. I propose this typology as a tool for studying stone beads almost a century after Horace Beck published his monumental bead typology. Beads are often neglected artifacts in archaeological...
Article
Our ongoing research has revealed that Manot Cave was intensively occupied during the Upper Palaeolithic period. Located within the Mediterranean woodland region and with its multi-layered units and thick archaeological accumulations, Manot Cave has the potential of refining the Levantine Upper Palaeolithic cultural sequence. This is especially tru...
Data
a b s t r a c t Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in the shells of the freshwater Unio mollusc yield information on the isotopic composition of the water in which the shell was formed, which in turn relates to climatic conditions prevailing during the bivalves' life span. Here we analysed shells from one modern Unio, from a modern lake shore in Anat...
Article
Full-text available
Marine molluscs have been recovered from sites around the Mediterranean Sea dating as far back as the Lower Palaeolithic, when hominins might have started consuming them (ca. 300 ka). During the Middle Palaeolithic and the early Upper Palaeolithic, humans (Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens) ate molluscs at many sites across the Mediterranean a...
Article
Full-text available
The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in Turkey contains thousands of mollusk shells, among them about 200 fossils. About 25 fossil gastropods and bivalvesoriginate in a Miocene fauna from the Mediterranean Tethys province, and are known from several localities in the Taurus Mountains, dating to the Miocene. The rest are scaphopods belonging to two spec...
Article
Invertebrates are animals that do not have a vertebral column. Most, notably mollusks (mollusc = British spelling; mollusk = American spelling), arthropods, echinoderms, corals, and very rarely sponges can be found in the archaeological record, whether the result of human activities or reflecting the former natural environment of a site. The invert...
Article
Full-text available
A pioneer survey of the Red Sea Coast of Eritrea revealed three shell middens dated to the mid-Holocene that reflect the exploitation of different coastal environments. Misse East and Gelalo Northwest were both dated to the eighth millennium BP. The former is dominated by Atactodea striata, a small bivalve that burrows in intertidal sands, the latt...
Article
Full-text available
Qafzeh Cave, the burial grounds of several anatomically modern humans, producers of Mousterian industry, yielded archaeological evidence reflecting their modern behavior. Dated to 92ka BP, the lower layers at the site contained a series of hearths, several human graves, flint artifacts, animal bones, a collection of sea shells, lumps of red ochre,...
Article
Full-text available
Dentalium shells have long been recognized as a hallmark of the Natufian Culture where they were used to decorate skulls (or heads). Little attention has been paid to Dentalium shells from earlier or later sites. The frequency of Dentalium in a shell assemblage and the length of the Dentalium beads may reflect changes in the availability of the raw...
Article
Full-text available
The use of beads and other personal ornaments is a trait of modern human behavior. During the Middle and Upper Paleolithic periods, beads were made out of shell, bone, ivory, egg shell, and occasionally of minerals. During the transition to agriculture in the Near East, stone, in particular green stone, was used for the first time to make beads and...
Article
Full-text available
A long season of excavation took place at Raqefet cave during the summer of 2006. In the first chamber we exposed an area rich with Natufian human burials (Locus 1), a large bedrock basin with a burial and two boulder mortars (Locus 2), an in situ Natufian layer (Locus 3), and two areas with rich cemented sediments (tufa) covering the cave floor (L...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeomalacology, the study of mollusc shells from archaeological sites, is a discipline present in Israel since the 1930s. In the last thirty years it has been studied extensively and today we can reconstruct many of the different uses of shells throughout the ages. During prehistoric periods shells were used mostly as simple beads. In the Neolit...
Article
The chance discovery of an Early Roman city dump (1st century CE) in Jerusalem has yielded for the first time ever quantitative data on garbage components that introduce us to the mundane daily life Jerusalemites led and the kind of animals that were featured in their diet. Most of the garbage consists of pottery shards, all common tableware, while...