Daniele Visioni

Daniele Visioni
Cornell University | CU · Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

PhD

About

88
Publications
8,677
Reads
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992
Citations
Introduction
My main work is on climate modelling of possible Solar Radiation Management methods (a form of Climate Engineering), with special focus on Sulfate Geoengineering. I also study the effect of past volcanic eruptions on climate as a proxy. I am interested in all the possible interactions of stratospheric sulfate: in the atmosphere (chemistry, large scale dynamics), at the surface, on ecosystems, on society. I am the co-chair of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - present
Cornell University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2018 - March 2018
National Center for Atmospheric Research
Position
  • Researcher
June 2017 - September 2017
NASA
Position
  • Researcher
Education
November 2015 - October 2018
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Field of study
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
December 2013 - October 2015
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Field of study
  • Physical and Chemical Sciences

Publications

Publications (88)
Article
Full-text available
Simulations of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering have typically considered injections at a constant rate over the entire year. However, the seasonal variability of both sunlight and the stratospheric circulation suggests seasonally‐dependent injection strategies. We simulated single point injections of the same amount of SO2 in each of the four...
Article
Full-text available
The problem of reducing the impacts of rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas on warming temperatures has led to the proposal of using stratospheric aerosols to reflect some of the incoming solar radiation back to space. The deliberate injection of sulfur into the stratosphere to form stratospheric sulfate aerosols, emulating volcanoes, will result in...
Article
Full-text available
By reflecting some incoming solar radiation, stratospheric aerosol intervention using SO2 would reduce global mean temperature. Previous research has shown that multiple injection latitudes can be used to maintain not only global mean temperature, but also interhemispheric and equator-to-pole temperature gradients. However, the regional climate res...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous climate modeling studies demonstrate the ability of feedback-regulated, stratospheric aerosol geoengineering with injection at multiple independent latitudes to meet multiple simultaneous temperature-based objectives in the presence of anthropogenic climate change. However, the impacts of climate change are not limited to rising temperatur...
Article
Full-text available
Making informed future decisions about solar radiation modification (SRM; also known as solar geoengineering)—approaches such as stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) that would cool the climate by reflecting sunlight—requires projections of the climate response and associated human and ecosystem impacts. These projections, in turn, will rely on si...
Preprint
Recent model inter-comparison studies highlighted model discrepancies in reproducing the climatic impacts of large explosive volcanic eruptions, calling into question the reliability of global aerosol model simulations for future scenarios. Here, we analyse the simulated evolution of the stratospheric aerosol plume following the well observed June...
Article
Full-text available
Modeling experiments reducing surface temperatures via an idealized reduction of the solar constant have often been used as analogs for Stratospheric Aerosol Injection (SAI), thereby implicitly assuming that solar dimming captures the essential physical mechanism through which SAI influences surface climate. While the omission of some important pro...
Preprint
The paper constitutes part 2 of a study performing a first systematic inter-model comparison of the atmospheric responses to stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections (SAI) at various latitudes as simulated by three state-of-the-art Earth System Models – CESM2(WACCM6), UKESM1.0, and GISS-E2.1-G. We use a set of five sensitivity experiments with cons...
Preprint
There is now a substantial literature of climate model studies of equatorial or tropical stratospheric SO2 injections that aim to counteract the surface warming produced by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases. Here we present the results from the first systematic intercomparison of climate responses in three Earth System Models where the inje...
Preprint
Stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) is a prospective climate intervention technology that would seek to abate climate change by deflecting back into space a small fraction of the incoming solar radiation. While most consideration given to SAI assumes a global intervention, this paper considers an alternative scenario whereby SAI might be deployed...
Article
Full-text available
Sulfate geoengineering (SG) methods based on lower stratospheric tropical injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2) have been widely discussed in recent years, focusing on the direct and indirect effects they would have on the climate system. Here a potential alternative method is discussed, where sulfur emissions are located at the surface or in the tropo...
Preprint
Solar climate intervention using stratospheric aerosol injection is a proposed method of reducing global mean temperatures to reduce some of the consequences of climate change. A detailed assessment of responses and impacts of such an intervention is needed with multiple global models to support societal decisions regarding the use of these approac...
Article
Full-text available
This study assesses the impacts of stratospheric aerosol intervention (SAI) and solar dimming on stratospheric ozone based on the G6 Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiments, called G6sulfur and G6solar. For G6sulfur, an enhanced stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden reflects some of the incoming solar radiation back into sp...
Article
Full-text available
Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering has been proposed as a potential solution to reduce climate change and its impacts. Here, we explore the responses of the Hadley circulation (HC) intensity and the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) using the strategic stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, in which sulfur dioxide was injected into the stratos...
Preprint
Extreme weather events have been demonstrated to be increasing in frequency and intensity across the globe and are anticipated to increase further with projected changes in climate. Solar climate intervention strategies, specifically stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI), have the potential to minimise some of the impacts of a changing climate whi...
Article
Full-text available
As part of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project a numerical experiment known as G6sulfur has been designed in which temperatures under a high-forcing future scenario (SSP5-8.5) are reduced to those under a medium-forcing scenario (SSP2-4.5) using the proposed geoengineering technique of stratospheric aerosol intervention (SAI). G6sulfur...
Article
Studies of stratospheric solar geoengineering have tended to focus on modification of the sulfuric acid aerosol layer, and almost all climate model experiments that mechanistically increase the sulfuric acid aerosol burden assume injection of SO2. A key finding from these model studies is that the radiative forcing would increase sublinearly with i...
Article
Full-text available
Stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI), as a possible supplement to emission reduction, has the potential to reduce some of the risks associated with climate change. Adding aerosols to the lower stratosphere would result in temporary global cooling. However, different choices for the aerosol injection latitude(s) and season(s) have been shown to lea...
Article
Full-text available
Injecting sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere with the intent to create an artificial reflective aerosol layer is one of the most studied options for solar radiation management. Previous modelling studies have shown that stratospheric sulfur injections have the potential to compensate for the greenhouse-gas-induced warming at the global scale. How...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study assesses the impacts of sulfate aerosol intervention (SAI) and solar dimming on stratospheric ozone based on the G6 Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiments, called G6sulfur and G6solar. For G6sulfur the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden is increased to reflect some of the incoming solar radiation back into sp...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding possible climate futures that include carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and solar radiation modification (SRM) requires thinking not just about staying within the remaining carbon budget, but also about politics and people. However, despite growing interest in CDR and SRM, scenarios focused on these potential responses to climate change te...
Preprint
As part of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project a numerical experiment known as G6sulfur has been designed in which temperatures under a high-forcing future scenario (SSP5-8.5) are reduced to those under a medium-forcing scenario (SSP2-4.5) using the proposed geoengineering technique of stratospheric aerosol intervention (SAI). G6sulfur...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Stratospheric aerosol intervention (SAI) has been proposed to counter greenhouse gas induced warming. Different sulfur injection strategies have been studied to limit some of the known side effects of SAI on the surface climate. Here we explore the effects of these sulfur injection strategies on total column ozone (TCO) inclu...
Preprint
Sulfate geoengineering (SG) methods based on lower stratospheric tropical injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2) have been widely discussed in recent years, focusing on the direct and indirect effects they would have on the climate system. Here a potential alternative method is discussed, where sulfur emissions are located at the surface in the form of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI), as a possible supplement to emission reduction, has the potential to reduce some of the risks associated with climate change. Adding aerosols to the lower stratosphere results in global cooling. However, different choices for the aerosol injection latitude(s) and season(s) have been shown to lead to significan...
Preprint
Full-text available
Simulating the complex aerosol microphysical processes in a comprehensive Earth System Model can be very computationally intensive and therefore many models utilize a modal approach, where aerosol size distributions are represented by observations-derived lognormal functions. This approach has been shown to yield satisfactory results in a large arr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Analyses of stratospheric solar geoengineering have focused on sulfate aerosol, and almost all climate model experiments on sulfate aerosol have assumed injection of SO2. Yet continuous injection of SO2 may produce overly large aerosols. Injection of SO3 or H2SO4 from an aircraft in stratospheric flight is expected to produce new accumulation-mode...
Preprint
Full-text available
Injecting sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere with the intent to create an artificial reflective aerosol layer is one of the most studied option for solar radiation management. Previous modelling studies have shown that stratospheric sulfur injections have the potential to compensate the greenhouse gas induced warming at the global scale. However,...
Article
Full-text available
We present here results from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) simulations for the experiments G6sulfur and G6solar for six Earth system models participating in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) Phase 6. The aim of the experiments is to reduce the warming that results from a high-tier emission scenario (Shared...
Article
Full-text available
A known adverse side effect of stratospheric aerosol modification (SAM) is the alteration of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), which is caused by the stratospheric heating associated with an artificial aerosol layer. Multiple studies found the QBO to slow down or even completely vanish for point-like injections of SO2 at the Equator. The cause...
Article
Full-text available
Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering focused on the Arctic could substantially reduce local and worldwide impacts of anthropogenic global warming. Because the Arctic receives little sunlight during the winter, stratospheric aerosols present in the winter at high latitudes have little impact on the climate, whereas stratospheric aerosols present dur...
Article
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessments (IPCC) Special Report on 1.5°C of global warming is clear. Nearly all pathways that hold global warming well below 2°C involve carbon removal (IPCC, 2015). In addition, solar geoengineering is being considered as a potential tool to offset warming, especially to limit temperature until negat...
Article
Full-text available
As the effects of anthropogenic climate change become more severe, several approaches for deliberate climate intervention to reduce or stabilize Earth’s surface temperature have been proposed. Solar radiation modification (SRM) is one potential approach to partially counteract anthropogenic warming by reflecting a small proportion of the incoming s...
Article
Full-text available
Solar geoengineering has been receiving increased attention in recent years as a potential temporary solution to offset global warming. One method of approximating global-scale solar geoengineering in climate models is via solar reduction experiments. Two generations of models in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) have now si...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present here results from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) simulations for the experiment G6sulfur and G6solar for six Earth System Models participating in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) Phase 6. The aim of the experiments is to reduce the warming from that resulting from a high-tier emission scenario (...
Article
Deliberately blocking out a small portion of the incoming solar radiation would cool the climate. One such approach would be injecting SO2 into the stratosphere, which would produce sulfate aerosols that would remain in the atmosphere for 1–3 years, reflecting part of the incoming shortwave radiation. The cooling produced by the aerosols can offset...
Article
Approximately 22% of sun-like stars have Earth-like exoplanets. Advanced civilizations may exist on these, and significant effort has been expended on the theoretical analysis of planetary systems, and accompanying practical detection instruments. The longevity of technological civilizations is unknown, as is the probability of less advanced societ...
Article
Full-text available
Previous climate modeling studies demonstrate the ability of feedback-regulated, stratospheric aerosol geoengineering with injection at multiple independent latitudes to meet multiple simultaneous temperature-based objectives in the presence of anthropogenic climate change. However, the impacts of climate change are not limited to rising temperatur...
Preprint
Full-text available
A known adverse side effect of stratospheric aerosol modification (SAM) is the modification of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), which is caused by the stratospheric heating associated with an artificial aerosol layer. Multiple studies found the QBO to slow down or even completely vanish for point-like injections of SO2 at the equator. The caus...
Article
Full-text available
By injecting SO2 into the stratosphere at four latitudes (30°, 15°N/S), it might be possible not only to reduce global mean surface temperature but also to minimize changes in the equator‐to‐pole and inter‐hemispheric gradients of temperature, further reducing some of the impacts arising from climate change relative to equatorial injection. This ca...
Preprint
Full-text available
Solar geoengineering has been receiving increased attention in recent years as a potential temporary solution to offset global warming. One method of approximating global-scale solar geoengineering in climate models is via solar reduction experiments. Two generations of models in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) have now si...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ozone profile measurements collected at L'Aquila (Italy, 42.4° N) during seventeen years of radio-sounding (2000–2016) are presented here, with an analysis of derived trends. Model results from the SPARC-CCMI exercise are used in parallel to highlight the physical and chemical mechanisms regulating mid-latitude ozone trends. The statistically signi...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, by releasing sulfate aerosol particles or their precursors (SO2) into the stratosphere to scatter more sunlight back to space, is a potential climate intervention option to counteract anthropogenic global warming. Previous studies focused on the effect of aerosol injection on annual mean...
Article
Full-text available
We perform the first multi-model intercomparison of the impact of nudged meteorology on the stratospheric residual circulation using hindcast simulations from the Chemistry–Climate Model Initiative (CCMI). We examine simulations over the period 1980–2009 from seven models in which the meteorological fields are nudged towards a reanalysis dataset an...
Article
Full-text available
We have derived values of the ultraviolet index (UVI) at solar noon using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet Model (TUV) driven by ozone, temperature and aerosol fields from climate simulations of the first phase of the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI-1). Since clouds remain one of the largest uncertainties in climate projections, we simulated o...
Article
Full-text available
We have derived values of the ultraviolet index (UVI) at solar noon using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet Model (TUV) driven by ozone, temperature and aerosol fields from climate simulations of the first phase of the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI-1). Since clouds remain one of the largest uncertainties in climate projections, we simulated o...
Preprint
Full-text available
We perform the first multi-model comparison of the impact of nudged meteorology on the stratospheric residual circulation using hindcast simulations from the Chemistry Climate Model Initiative (CCMI). We examine simulations over the period 1980–2009 from 5 models in which the meteorological fields are nudged towards reanalysis data and compare with...
Article
Full-text available
Climate models consistently predict an acceleration of the Brewer–Dobson circulation (BDC) due to climate change in the 21st century. However, the strength of this acceleration varies considerably among individual models, which constitutes a notable source of uncertainty for future climate projections. To shed more light upon the magnitude of this...
Article
Full-text available
Previous multi-model intercomparisons have shown that chemistry–climate models exhibit significant biases in tropospheric ozone compared with observations. We investigate annual-mean tropospheric column ozone in 15 models participating in the SPARC–IGAC (Stratosphere–troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate–International Global Atmospheric C...
Article
Full-text available
Climate models consistently predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) due to climate change in the 21st century. However, the strength of this acceleration varies considerably among individual models, which constitutes a notable source of uncertainty for future climate projections. To shed more light upon the magnitude of this...