Daniela (Danie) Stockmann

Daniela (Danie) Stockmann
Leiden University | LEI · Institute of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
7,599
Reads
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536
Citations
Introduction
My current research project "Authoritarianism2.0," funded by the European Research Council, traces the development of social media and their impact on public opinion and political participation in China. This interest grew out of my recent book "Media Commercialization and Authoritarian Rule in China" (Cambridge University Press, 2013). In 2015 the book received the Goldsmith Book Prize for best academic book on media, politics, and public affairs by the Shorenstein Center of Harvard University.
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - present
Leiden University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 2001 - April 2007
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Political Science
September 2000 - December 2001
SOAS, University of London
Field of study
  • Chinese Studies
September 1999 - May 2000
University of Rochester
Field of study
  • Political Science

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Public opinion polls show that political trust tends to be higher in authoritarian regimes compared to liberal democracies. Many scholars have argued that respondents may provide false answers out of fear about repercussions by the state, thereby skewing survey results in a positive direction. Using an unobtrusive measure based on affect transfer,...
Research
Full-text available
With the rise of the Internet a new data source has become available both to researchers and to the Chinese state. While digital sources of information provide new opportunities for conducting research, states also attempt to control and shape the information sources available online. Especially politically closed states like China are channeling r...
Book
In most liberal democracies commercialized media is taken for granted, but in many authoritarian regimes the introduction of market forces in the media represents a radical break from the past with uncertain political and social implications. In Media Commercialization and Authoritarian Rule in China, Daniela Stockmann argues that the consequences...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines a major change in campaigning through the means of mass media during the reform era. As the media commercialized and partially privatized, the state has tried increasingly to involve societal actors in the production of public service advertisements (PSAs) on television. Today, PSA campaigns are initiated by state and Party un...
Conference Paper
During the reform era the Chinese state has modernized the way in which campaigns are conducted. Today, the government focuses on public service advertising on television to actively shape people‘s attitudes and behavior on such issues as environmental protection and legal reform. More broadly, public service advertising is aimed at holding togethe...
Conference Paper
Based on an experiment with 210 adult Beijingers we investigate the extent to which public service advertising (PSAs) and their source labels lead to priming of affect toward the central government and attitudinal change concerning political trust. Results show that affect towards the Chinese central party-state is automatically activated upon mere...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how Chinese newspapers respond to opposing demands by audiences and Propaganda Department authorities about news regarding the United States when competition poses pressure on marketized media to make a profit. To examine the tone of news reporting about the U.S., I rely on a computer-aided text analysis of news stories publis...
Article
This study examines the role of the media in sustaining regime stability in an authoritarian context. The article engages the recent work on authoritarian resilience in comparative politics but goes beyond the standard focus on elections to other important institutions, such as the media and courts, that are used by authoritarian leaders to bolster...
Article
Full-text available
The Chinese media have undergone commercial liberalization during the reform era. Interviews with media practitioners reveal that media reform has brought about three different types of newspapers that differ with respect to their degree of commercial liberalization. Based on a natural experiment during the anti-Japanese protests in Beijing in 2005...
Chapter
Only two decades ago the main information source for China scholars abroad was the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), an open intelligence source of the CIA. FBIS collected, translated, and disseminated available news and information from Chinese media sources. During the Cultural Revolution most foreign researchers were not allowed to c...
Conference Paper
Exogenous shocks are said to play a key role in the breakdown of authoritarian regimes. This paper sheds light on the conditions under which crisis management play out to the advantage of authoritarian leaders, or not. By chance, a national probability survey of the Chinese population was conducted before and after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Base...
Article
This article investigates how and why measures developed in the American context yield different results in China. Research in the United States has shown that a person's level of political knowledge is a stronger and more consistent predictor of news reception compared to alternative measures, such as media consumption or education. Yet a case stu...
Article
Owing to the commercialization and marketization of Chinese television industry, various entertainment television programs have become prevalent in the past years. While entertainization draws attention from the audience and thus contributed to profit-making, it also has the potential to undermine the Chinese media’s role to propagate the goals and...

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