Daniela Lazo-Cancino

Daniela Lazo-Cancino
University of Concepción · Departamento de Zoología

PhD student
Doctoral internship at the Natural History Museum London

About

9
Publications
476
Reads
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21
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
21 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
The ongoing climate change could intensify endangerment of species with a restricted distribution and small population size, such as rare or endemic species. Magellanic tuco-tuco (Ctenomys magellanicus) is the southernmost Patagonian-Fueguian fossorial caviomorph rodent with a small distribution. This species has been categorized as vulnerable due...
Article
Full-text available
Background Fragmentation of native forests is a highly visible result of human land-use throughout the world. In this study, we evaluated the effects of landscape fragmentation and matrix features on the genetic diversity and structure of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, the natural reservoir of Hantavirus in southern South America. We focused our work...
Data
Georreferences for each patch Georreferences (decimal system) for each patch surveyed.
Data
Code to perform the analyzes used in this study Annotated R code. This should be used in combination with the raw data delivered in supplementary materials: “comb_999.grd.zip”, “gammast.txt”, and “lonlat.txt”.
Data
Raster File for landscape features Raster file with landscape soil uses for 2007 at the study site with 0.048 × 0.0034 pixels of resolution.
Data
Criteria for delimitation of patch areas Criteria for delimitation of patch areas. Criteria were designed visualizing the patches in Google Earth Pro v 7.1 (http://www.google.com/earth/) and based on Soil Use Cover data of the Chilean National Environmental Information System (http://ide.mma.gob.cl/).
Data
Data for each individual used in this work Sampling site, patch name, coordinates of specimens, GenBank accession number and voucher number of each specimen used in this study.
Conference Paper
Caviomorpha (Rodentia, Hystricognathi) es uno de los clados más diversos de mamíferos sudamericanos. Se encuentran en todos los hábitats disponibles en el neotrópico con diversos hábitos locomotores y junto a su larga historia evolutiva, son un interesante modelo para estudiar patrones macroevolutivos. En el presente estudio se evaluó si la gran di...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project constitutes the first exhaustive attempt to evaluate and contrast the main proposals regarding the Andean uplift effect on the diversification of South American biota. Thereby, it will possible make a coupling of the Andean orogeny with the dynamics of diversification that give rise to the current small mammal richness of this continent.
Project
The question of what determines species diversity is a fundamental question in ecology and evolutionary biology, and considered one of the top reseach challenges in all of science. Speciation, extinction, and character evolution are historical processes involved in generating species diversity, therefore examining how the rates of these processes change can help to identify the specific macroevolutionary processes that generate diversity over time and across groups, like the distinctive presence of biodiversity hotspots (BH) of South America’s biota. Many scientific efforts have been focused within BHs, but despite that the patterns of species diversity are the result of historical process such as speciation and extinction, relevant aspects such as the origin and evolutionary history of species from BH have been less studied. Even more, the interaction between the complex geomorpholical and climate history of South America and the great diversification of many lineages are still poorly understood, despite the existence of many competing hypotheses. Therefore, the study of historical evolutionary processes that have led to the current patterns of diversity distribution, should give strong foundations for the search of common causes for the origin of South America’s biota. The use of phylogenetic based models to construct evolutionary history from living species offers a solution for evaluating hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of diversity patterns evaluating extrinsic and intrinsic drivers of species diversity. Recent years have been witness of a significant shift from descriptive to probabilistic approaches in attempt to explain long-standing questions in evolutionary biology across various temporal and spatial scales, and the origin and patterns of biodiversity at macroevolutionary level. The Bayesian revolution and likelihood-based statistical inference have been credited for much of this change. In addition, the use of evolutionary Bayesian inferences will allow researchers to quantify the uncertainty of specific evolutionary hypotheses accounting for observed biodiversity patterns and their intrinsic drivers. Also, this approach allows the forecasting of the effects of environmental factors or extrinsic drivers by studying its potential impact on diversification rates. The impetus behind this proposal is the use of probabilistic modeling approaches to study the underlying evolutionary processes and evaluate the causes that explain patterns of biodiversity among terrestrial vertebrates from South America BHs we observe today. In order to estimate the effect of evolutionary history on the observed biodiversity patterns we will use several data bases currently available for environmental and ecological factors, the genetic and phylogeny of different vertebrates as study models.