Daniela Iglesias

Daniela Iglesias
University of Leeds · School of Physics and Astronomy

Ph.D. in Astrophysics

About

22
Publications
1,259
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149
Citations
Introduction
My research interests are exoplanets, circumstellar disks, exocomets, debris disks, astrospheres, astrobiology and star and planet formation. I am currently searching for the presence of gas in debris disks. This gas might be due to Falling Evaporating Bodies (FEBs) or exocomets releasing new gas in the disks. I use high resolution spectroscopy in the UV-optical range to detect this gas. I search for narrow absorption features produced by the transit of the gas in front of the star.

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
We present optical spectroscopy observations of 145 high-mass pre-main-sequence candidates from the catalog of Vioque et al. 2020 From these, we provide evidence for the Herbig nature of 128 sources. This increases the number of known objects of the class by ∼50%. We determine the stellar parameters of these sources using the spectra and Gaia EDR3...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present optical spectroscopy observations of 145 high-mass pre-main sequence candidates from the catalogue of Vioque et al. (2020). From these, we provide evidence for the Herbig nature of 128 sources. This increases the number of known objects of the class by $\sim50\%$. We determine the stellar parameters of these sources using the spectra and...
Article
Full-text available
Exocomets are small bodies releasing gas and dust which orbit stars other than the Sun. Their existence was first inferred from the detection of variable absorption features in stellar spectra in the late 1980s using spectroscopy. More recently, they have been detected through photometric transits from space, and through far-IR/mm gas emission with...
Preprint
Full-text available
Exocomets are small bodies releasing gas and dust which orbit stars other than the Sun. Their existence was first inferred from the detection of variable absorption features in stellar spectra in the late 1980s using spectroscopy. More recently, they have been detected through photometric transits from space, and through far-IR/mm gas emission with...
Article
Full-text available
Context. While exoplanets are now routinely detected, the detection of small bodies in extrasolar systems remains challenging. Since the discovery of sporadic events, which are interpreted to be exocomets (falling evaporating bodies) around β Pic in the early 1980s, only ∼20 stars have been reported to host exocomet-like events. Aims. We aim to exp...
Preprint
Full-text available
While exoplanets are now routinely detected, the detection of small bodies in extrasolar systems remains challenging. Since the discovery of sporadic events interpreted as exocomets (Falling Evaporating Bodies) around $\beta$ Pic in the early 80s, only $\sim$20 stars have been reported to host exocomet-like events. We aim to expand the sample of kn...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present the detection of an unusually large transient gas absorption in several ionized species in the debris disc star HD 37306 using high-resolution optical spectra. We have been analysing a large sample of debris discs searching for circumstellar gas absorptions aiming to determine the frequency of gas in debris discs. HD 37306 stood out show...
Article
Full-text available
We present the detection of an unusually large transient gas absorption in several ionized species in the debris disc star HD 37306 using high-resolution optical spectra. We have been analysing a large sample of debris discs searching for circumstellar gas absorptions aiming to determine the frequency of gas in debris discs. HD 37306 stood out show...
Article
Context. Debris disks are the natural by-products of the planet formation process. Scattered or polarized light observations are mostly sensitive to small dust grains that are released from the grinding down of bigger planetesimals. Aims. High angular resolution observations at optical wavelengths can provide key constraints on the radial and azimu...
Article
Context. Debris disks are the natural by-products of the planet formation process. Scattered or polarized light observations are mostly sensitive to small dust grains that are released from the grinding down of bigger planetesimals. Aims. High angular resolution observations at optical wavelengths can provide key constraints on the radial and azimu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Debris disks are the natural by-products of the planet formation process. Scattered or polarized light observations are mostly sensitive to small dust grains that are released from the grinding down of bigger planetesimals. High angular resolution observations at optical wavelengths can provide key constraints on the radial and azimuthal distributi...
Article
Debris discs can be seen as the leftovers of giant planet formation and the possible nurseries of rocky planets. While M-type stars outnumber more massive stars we know very little about the time evolution of their circumstellar discs at ages older than ∼10 Myr. Sub-millimetre observations are best to provide first order estimates of the available...
Article
Full-text available
Debris disks are second generation dusty disks thought to be devoid of gas. However, this idea has been challenged in the last years by gas detections in some systems. We compiled a database of 301 debris disks and collected high–resolution optical spectra for ∼77% of them. From the analysis of these data we identified a group of 23 debris disks pr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Debris disks are second generation dusty disks thought to be devoid of gas. However, this idea has been challenged in the last years by gas detections in some systems. We compiled a database of 301 debris disks and collected high--resolution optical spectra for $\sim77\%$ of them. From the analysis of these data we identified a group of 23 debris d...
Preprint
Debris disks can be seen as the left-overs of giant planet formation and the possible nurseries of rocky planets. While M-type stars out-number more massive stars we know very little about the time evolution of their circumstellar disks at ages older than $\sim 10$\,Myr. Sub-millimeter observations are best to provide first order estimates of the a...
Article
Full-text available
Context. Debris discs have often been described as gas-poor discs as the gas-to-dust ratio is expected to be considerably lower than in primordial, protoplanetary discs. However, recent observations have confirmed the presence of a non-negligible amount of cold gas in the circumstellar (CS) debris discs around young main-sequence stars. This cold g...
Article
Full-text available
Context. The search for extrasolar planets has been limited so far to close orbit (typ. ≤5 au) planets around mature solar-type stars on the one hand, and to planets on wide orbits (≥10 au) around young stars on the other hand. To get a better view of the full giant planet population, we have started a survey to search for giant planets around a sa...
Article
We present an intensive monitoring of high-resolution spectra of the Ca {\sc ii} K line in the A7IV shell star $\Phi$ Leo at very short (minutes, hours), short (night to night), and medium term (weeks, months) timescales. The spectra show remarkable variable absorptions on timescales of hours, days and months. The characteristics of these sporadic...
Article
Full-text available
The intrinsically faint M dwarfs are the most numerous stars in the Galaxy, have main-sequence lifetimes longer than the Hubble time, and host some of the most interesting planetary systems known to date. Their identification and classification throughout the Galaxy is crucial to unravel the processes involved in the formation of planets, stars and...

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