Daniel Schwartz

Daniel Schwartz
University of Chile · Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial

PhD (CMU)
Professor (Assistant)

About

27
Publications
15,495
Reads
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679
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
555 Citations
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Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Governments around the globe have taken different measures to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic, including the lockdown of people to decrease infections. The effect of such a strategy on transport demand is important not only for the current pandemic but also to understand changes in transport use and for future emergencies. We analyse a 2019–2020 datab...
Article
Full-text available
The paper examines a large-scale mandatory food labeling regulation to identify its effects on consumer behavior.
Article
Full-text available
Transport data is crucial for transport planning and operations. Collecting high-quality data has long been challenging due to the difficulty of achieving adequate spatiotemporal coverage within a representative sample. The increasingly integrated use of Information and Communication technologies in transport systems offers an opportunity to collec...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused great disruption to the service sector, and it has, in turn, adapted by implementing measures that reduce physical contact among employees and users; examples include home-office work and the setting of occupancy restrictions at indoor locations. The design of services in the context of a pandemic requires balancing...
Article
Organizations and policymakers increasingly rely on economic incentives to prompt participation in activities amongst those who were previously not engaged. We ran a field experiment with a recycling program to examine incentives' effectiveness to motivate new behavior—i.e., attract non-recyclers. We compared standard contingent incentives (payment...
Article
Households' insurance coverage against severe losses is central to their financial resilience. Features of the US National Flood Insurance Program offer insights into consumers' coverage over large stakes that are not typically possible in other markets. We examine the coverage limits (the amount of a home's value that is insured) of over 100,000 h...
Article
The design of effective incentive schemes that are both successful in motivating employees and keeping down costs is of critical importance. Research has demonstrated that prosocial incentives, where individuals’ effort benefits a charitable organization, can sometimes be more effective than standard monetary incentives. However, most research has...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transport data is crucial for transport planning and operations. Collecting high-quality data has long been challenging due to the difficulty of achieving adequate spatiotemporal coverage within a representative sample. The increasingly integrated use of communications technology in transport systems offers an opportunity to collect data using non-...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused great disruption to the service sector, which has in turn adapted by implementing measures that reduce physical distancing among employees and users; examples include home-office work and the setting of occupancy restrictions at indoor locations. The design of services in the context of a pandemic requires balancing...
Preprint
Full-text available
Organizations and policy makers are increasingly relying on economic incentives to prompt participation in activities amongst those who were previously not engaged. We ran a field experiment with a recycling program to examine incentives' effectiveness to motive new behavior-i.e., attract non-recyclers. We compared standard contingent incentives (p...
Article
Full-text available
Promoting products for ‘green’ people has become an important strategy to encourage sustainable consumption. We test the effectiveness of the green identity labelling technique, which encourages pro-environmental purchases by associating them with an eco-friendly image. We conducted four experiments (online, laboratory and two field experiments) in...
Chapter
In this chapter, the authors review and discuss the drivers that affect sustainable consumption by focusing on behavioural interventions employed in public policies by private organizations and governments. They differentiate interventions that may promote intrinsic (pro-environmental or prosocial) motivation from those that consider extrinsic fact...
Article
Full-text available
We take advantage of the gradual implementation of a comprehensive mandatory food labeling regulation introduced in Chile to identify its effects on consumer behavior. Using individual-level scandata from transactions in a big-box supermarket, we estimate a demand model for differentiated products in which a food label indicator captures the warnin...
Article
Full-text available
Many serious problems, including those associated with the environment, warrant a sustained response, but the emotions that motivate action are often transient. We conducted five online experiments examining the impact of affective ads about global warming on pro-environmental behaviors. We find that sadness-inducing videos led to more time devoted...
Research
Full-text available
Climate change is an almost perfect example of what economists call a " free rider problem. " Everyone would gain if everyone made relatively minor sacrifices. But the benefits of any one individual's sacrifices are spread over millions of individuals, including those in future generations. No one is motivated to sacrifice and everyone suffers. Nat...
Article
Full-text available
The social and behavioural sciences are critical for informing climate- and energy-related policies. We describe a decision science approach to applying those sciences. It has three stages: formal analysis of decisions, characterizing how well-informed actors should view them; descriptive research, examining how people actually behave in such circu...
Article
Many consumers have monetary and environmental motivations for saving energy. Indeed, saving energy produces both monetary benefits, by reducing energy bills, and environmental benefits, by reducing carbon footprints. We examined how consumers’ willingness and reasons to enroll in energy-savings programs are affected by whether advertisements empha...
Article
Full-text available
The feeling of being observed or merely participating in an experiment can affect individuals' behavior. Referred to as the Hawthorne effect, this inconsistently observed phenomenon can both provide insight into individuals' behavior and confound the interpretation of experimental manipulations. Here, we pursue both topics in examining how the Hawt...
Article
With the enactment of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, U.S. President Obama made a public commitment to a new approach to energy production and transmission in the United States. It features installing smart meters and related technologies in residential homes, as part of transforming the current electrical grid into a “smart grid.”...
Article
Full-text available
Data mining techniques provide a popular and powerful tool set to generate various data-driven classification systems. In this paper, we investigate the combined use of self-organizing maps (SOM) and nonsmooth nonconvex optimization techniques in order to produce a working case of a data-driven risk classification system. The optimization approach...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Data mining techniques provide a popular and powerful toolset to address both clinical and management issues in the area of health care. This paper describes the study of assigning prostate cancer patients into homogenous groups with the aim to support future clinical treatment decisions. The cluster analysis based model is suggested and an applica...
Conference Paper
Accurate classification of prostate cancer patients into risk groups is important to assist in the identification of appropriate treatment paths. Current rules used to classify patients into low, intermediate and high risk groups have been developed by clinical experts using an evidence based approach. The available data from the Alfred Hospital is...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The minimum payment warning, a notice that informs credit cardholders of the downside of making the minimum payment, has been described as a perverse nudge because it negatively affects those who would pay more than the minimum, presumably due to the anchoring bias. This issue is tackled in a massive field experiment by introducing a novel ``statement balance warning." The experiment used email payment reminders that randomly added minimum payment or statement balance warnings. Results indicate that the messages shifted actual payment distribution depending on the warning and that payments increased when the statement balance warning was added. The analysis is combined with causal random forests to examine heterogeneous treatment effects, underlying mechanisms, and the optimum policy in different scenarios, and with an online experiment to further examine conditions in which the warnings affect payment behavior. The statement balance warning makes debtors give priority to paying a higher amount, which significantly increases payments by cardholders who are more likely to make deliberate decisions every billing cycle and improves the understanding of the consequences of not paying the statement balance. Furthermore, the optimal policy to decrease interest charges or debt delinquency indicates that cardholders should receive a combination of warning messages depending on their payment history. The results provide evidence that the statement balance warning offers a new element for financial market regulation to improve the decision-making of indebted households. The experiment was conducted in 2019 and was pre-registered in AsPredicted.
Project
Companies and policymakers are increasingly relying on economic incentives as a means of changing people’s behavior. For example, workplace wellness programs use incentives to encourage a healthier lifestyle and municipalities offer financial incentives to fund recycling programs. The goal of these incentives is to motivate previous non-compliers—to participate in an activity that they were not engaged in before. We ran a field experiment with a recycling program to examine which types of incentives are more effective in motivating new behavior, in the form of attracting previous non-recyclers. We compared the effects of standard incentives (payment contingent on recycling) to non-contingent incentives (upfront unconditional payment). We found that a high contingent incentive was as effective as a non-contingent incentive (of any size), but this masked substantial differences in who participated in the program. Over 20% of those participating under non-contingent incentives were new recyclers, compared to only 4% under contingent incentives. This difference was particularly stark when incentives were relatively small: close to 20% of participants under non-continent incentives had never recycled before, compared to 0 new recyclers under contingent incentives. Follow-up surveys suggest that non-contingent incentives were effective in developing long-term dynamics as well, with new recyclers reporting that they continued to do so. A second experiment conceptually replicated this effect in an online job market. A back-of-the-envelope calculation reveals that non-contingent incentives were substantially more effective in attracting “new” participants.
Project
*Authors: Daniel Schwartz (University of Chile), George Loewenstein (Carnegie Mellon University), and Loreto Agüero (University of Chile) *Abstract: Promoting products for “green” people has become an important strategy to encourage sustainable consumption. We test the effectiveness of the green labeling technique, which encourages pro-environmental purchases by associating them with an eco-friendly image. We conducted several experiments, across different settings, in which individuals could purchase green products that, in some conditions, were accompanied by a green label (e.g., “this product is for green shoppers”). We find that the green label increases purchase of green products across the consumer settings examined in our experiments. We also examine market factors that can moderate this effect and find that green labels only increases sales when there is no advertised price discount on the green product and that green labels have a bigger impact on people with demographics associated with pro-environmental values.