Daniel I Rubenstein

Daniel I Rubenstein
Princeton University | PU · Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

PhD. Duke University 1977

About

292
Publications
92,419
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 1980 - present
Princeton University
Position
  • Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology

Publications

Publications (292)
Article
The potential for groups to outperform the cognitive capabilities of even highly skilled individuals, known as the “wisdom of the crowd”, is crucial to the functioning of democratic institutions. In recent years, increasing polarization has led to concern about its effects on the accuracy of electorates, juries, courts, and congress. While there is...
Article
Although social-ecological fisheries research is growing, comparatively little attention is paid to fisheries in urban environments. We aim to address this imbalance, because as cities expand worldwide, we expect urban fisheries to become more widespread and important in providing food/nutrition security, recreation, community well-being, and other...
Article
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Predation is one of the main evolutionary drivers of social grouping. While it is well appreciated that predation risk is likely not shared equally among individuals within groups, its detailed quantification has remained difficult due to the speed of attacks and the highly-dynamic nature of collective prey response. Here, using high-resolution tra...
Article
Here, we revise Pietraszewski's model of groups by assigning participant pairs with two triplets, denoting: (1) the type of game that models the interaction, (2) its critical switching point between alternatives (i.e., the game's similarity threshold), and (3) the perception of strategic similarity with the opponent. These triplets provide a set of...
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Although the COVID-19 vaccine has dramatically changed the fight against the pandemic, many exhibit vaccination-hesitancy. At the same time, continued human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases pose an alarming threat to humanity. Based on the theory of Subjective Expected Relative Similarity (SERS) and a recent international study that drasticall...
Preprint
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This paper combines deep learning techniques for species detection, 3D model fitting, and metric learning in one pipeline to perform individual animal identification from photographs by exploiting unique coat patterns. This is the first work to attempt this and, compared to traditional 2D bounding box or segmentation based CNN identification pipeli...
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CONTEXT Farm numbers are steadily declining in Europe and globally while farms become larger and more intensive. Driven in part by worsening macroeconomic conditions, these structural changes and the associated rationalization of agricultural supply chains have affected social relations in rural areas. In turn, farmers' social contacts influence fa...
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Macroecological studies that require habitat suitability data for many species often derive this information from expert opinion. However, expert‐based information is inherently subjective and thus prone to errors. The increasing availability of GPS tracking data offers opportunities to evaluate and supplement expert‐based information with detailed...
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The success of market-based mechanisms in reducing conflicts and internalizing externalities depends on their ability to clarify property rights amongst heterogenous resource users. We investigate the effectiveness of novel markets in achieving their goals using the case study of grazing markets in Laikipia County, Kenya. In this system, sheep- and...
Article
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For grazing herbivores, dung density in feeding areas is an important determinant of exposure risk to fecal-orally transmitted parasites. When host species share the same parasite species, a nonrandom distribution of their cumulative dung density and/or nonrandom ranging and feeding behavior may skew exposure risk and the relative selection pressur...
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Aim: Comprehensive, global information on species' occurrences is an essential biodiversity variable and central to a range of applications in ecology, evolution, biogeography and conservation. Expert range maps often represent a species' only available distributional information and play an increasing role in conservation assessments and macroeco...
Preprint
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Levels of sociality in nature vary widely. Some species are solitary; others live in family groups; some form complex multi-family societies. Increased levels of social interaction can allow for the spread of useful innovations and beneficial information, but can also facilitate the spread of harmful contagions, such as infectious diseases. It is n...
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(read-only version: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/share/author/5KWZUPEPKC4RUVWP2YCS?target=10.1002/fsh.10695) The Ten Steps to Responsible Inland Fisheries are global recommendations to address the subordinate position of inland fisheries in sustainability dialogues. Regional and local perspectives are essential for implementing global initiativ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Predation is one of the main evolutionary drivers of social grouping. While it is well appreciated that predation risk is likely not shared equally among individuals within groups, its detailed quantification has remained difficult due to the speed of attacks and the highly-dynamic nature of collective prey response. Here, using high-resolution tra...
Article
Full-text available
Polygyny is the most common mating system in mammals, and many species form uni-male multi-female groups (UM-MF units). Polygynous systems are traditionally distinguished according to male reproductive strategies, such as “resource defense” or “female defense,” both of which are often described in the literature as forming “harems.” However, this f...
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The forage maturation hypothesis (FMH) states that energy intake for ungulates is maximised when forage biomass is at intermediate levels. Nevertheless, metabolic allometry and different digestive systems suggest that resource selection should vary across ungulate species. By combining GPS relocations with remotely sensed data on forage characteris...
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Equids are chronically infected with parasitic strongyle nematodes. There is a rich literature on horse strongyles, but they are difficult to identify morphologically and genetic studies on strongyles infecting other equid species are few, hampering studies of host specificity. We sequenced expelled worms from two sympatric zebra species in central...
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The horses of Shackleford Banks, NC, United States are harassed by many species of biting flies. Apart from being a nuisance, their bites can lead to blood loss and transmit disease. As a result, these horses tend to avoid areas where fly abundances are high. Like other free-ranging horse populations, environmental factors such as low wind speeds a...
Article
The distribution and abundance of different wildlife herbivores was studied in Samburu-Laikipia landscape. The study sites included; Mpala and Oljogi, both commercial ranches in Laikipia district; Oldonyiro and Kipsing community areas in Isiolo district; West Gate Conservancy, Ngaroni Community area, Kalama Community area and Sessia-Barsalinga Comm...
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Collective behavior provides a framework for understanding how the actions and properties of groups emerge from the way individuals generate and share information. In humans, information flows were initially shaped by natural selection yet are increasingly structured by emerging communication technologies. Our larger, more complex social networks n...
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ContextReduced connectivity across grassland ecosystems can impair their functional heterogeneity and negatively impact large herbivore populations. Maintaining landscape connectivity across human-dominated rangelands is therefore a key conservation priority.Objective Integrate data on large herbivore occurrence and species richness with analyses o...
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Fisheries are coupled human-natural systems locally, regionally, and globally. However, human-nature interactions within and between adjacent and distant systems (metacouplings) are rarely studied in fisheries despite their prevalence and policy relevance. We filled this knowledge gap by using network models to identify how the severe acute respira...
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Climate change-induced bush encroachment into grasslands has profound impacts on herbivores in African grasslands through changing their food and water supplies and influencing their perception of predation risk, and thus modulating the trade-off between resource acquisition and predator avoidance. For plains zebras (Equus quagga), bush is usually...
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Small cetaceans face persistent threats from fisheries interactions, making effective mitigation a priority for conservation. In southwest Florida, interactions come primarily from small-scale recreational hook and line and trap/pot fisheries, with regional stranding network partners working with federal agency managers to assess and intervene as p...
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Analysis of the intestinal microbiota and physiological parameters in mammalian infancy can reveal health status. In this study, we used a combination of molecular and immunochemical approaches to assess fecal microbiota as well as Cortisol (Cor), Triiodothyronine (T3) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels of young forest musk deer (FMD), from birth to...
Article
https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1cKk4biU1p3jk -- Fisheries contribute to food and nutrition security, livelihoods, and poverty alleviation for billions of people globally. However, human-environmental interactions in fisheries are rarely assessed locally, regionally, and globally at the same time, limiting social-ecological resilience in fisheries...
Article
One of the most iconic wild equids, the plains zebra occupies a broad region of sub-Saharan Africa and exhibits a wide range of phenotypic diversity in stripe patterns that have been used to classify multiple sub-species. After decades of relative stability, albeit with a loss of at least one recognized subspecies, the total population of plains ze...
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ContextThe global drylands cover 41% of the terrestrial surface and support millions of pastoralists and host diverse flora and fauna. Ongoing socioeconomic and environmental transformations in drylands make it imperative to understand how to achieve the twin goals of food security and ecosystem health.Objectives The review focuses on examining the...
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Following the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, governments around the globe coerced their citizens to adhere to preventive health behaviours, aiming to reduce the effective reproduction numbers of the virus. Driven by game theoretic considerations and inspired by the work of US National Research Council's Committee on Food Habits (1943) during WWII,...
Article
Social connectivity is important for measuring the fitness of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). While interactions in fission‐fusion societies vary between individuals, studies show that repeated interactions enhance reproduction and foraging success. Injuries that potentially remove an individual from its association network may dis...
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Marine fisheries are social-ecological systems important for human health and livelihoods. However, research approaches that consider human–nature interactions within as well as between adjacent and distant fisheries are scarce. As such, we measured and modeled marine fisheries catches at local and regional scales over 65 years (1950–2014), assesse...
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Human health and livelihoods are threatened by declining marine fisheries catches, causing substantial interest in the sources and dynamics of fishing. Catch analyses in individual exclusive economic zones (EEZs) and the high seas are abundant, and research across multiple EEZs is growing. However, no previous studies have systematically compared c...
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Eco-immunological research is encumbered by a lack of basic research in a wild context and by the availability of few non-invasive tools to measure the internal state of wild animals. The recent development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measuring immunoglobulins in faecal samples from Soay sheep prompted us to optimize such an assay t...
Article
Multilevel societies (MLSs), stable nuclear social units within a larger collective encompassing multiple nested social levels, occur in several mammalian lineages. Their architectural complexity and size impose specific demands on their members requiring adaptive solutions in multiple domains. The functional significance of MLSs lies in their memb...
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Acoustic signaling plays an important role in mother-offspring recognition and subsequent bond-formation. It remains unclear, however, if mothers and offspring use acoustic signaling in the same ways and for the same reasons throughout the juvenile stage, particularly after mutual recognition has been adequately established. Moreover, despite its c...
Article
Interfemale competition regimes in primate societies have been described as despotic or egalitarian based on female social behaviour. Hierarchies and nepotism are typical of despotic primates, where dominance rank and kinship are known to be strong drivers of who grooms whom and who fights with whom. However, a general theory for what structures fe...
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Predator restorations often result in apparent competition, where co-occurring prey populations experience asymmetric predation pressure driven by predator preferences. In many rangeland ecosystems, livestock share the landscape with wildlife, including ungulates and the large carnivores that consume them. We examined whether apparent competition r...
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Many social animal species produce vocalizations believed to facilitate group contraction when one or more group members have become distant. However, the mechanisms underlying this function remain unclear for many species. We examined this question with data on a semi-free ranging group of 16 adult domesticated goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) inhabi...
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Citizen science has been touted as an effective means to collect large-scale data while engaging the public. We demonstrate that children as young as 9 years old can collect valuable mammal monitoring data using camera traps while connecting with nature and learning through their own scientific discoveries. Indian, Kenyan, Mexican, and American stu...
Article
Prey animals often face a trade-off between investing time in antipredator behaviour and performing self-maintenance activities, such as foraging. Parents face particularly high stakes as they must protect highly vulnerable offspring while also meeting elevated energetic demands. To optimize this trade-off, the risk allocation hypothesis predicts t...
Article
Rangelands and the wildlife and livestock they support are critical to human livelihoods, but rangeland ecosystems increasingly suffer from overgrazing and degradation. Planned grazing, a strategy that commonly involves time-controlled rotations of high-density (bunched) groups of cattle across a pasture, is marketed as a method to enhance rangelan...
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When predators are removed or suppressed for generations, prey populations tend to increase and when predators are re-introduced, prey densities should fall back to pre-control levels. In cases of apparent competition where there are alternate abundant and rare prey species, rare species may decline further than expected or disappear altogether. Re...
Data
Hourly movement data. Hourly movement data for African lions, Grevy’s zebras and Plains zebras used in simulations of encounter rates. (XLSX)
Data
Comparison of ecological conditions. The compatibility of temporally disconnected movement data. (DOCX)
Data
Details of lion collar operation. Dates that collars were operational, number of sample days, hourly distance traveled (SD), and daily distance traveled (SD) for female lions, Plains zebra and Grevy's zebra. Lions with numbers were recaptured more than once and collar either changed or repaired during study. (DOCX)
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Rotational grazing management approaches are regarded as strategies for sustaining rangeland productivity and continue to be applied across many parts of the world. In Africa, livestock farmers implementing rotational grazing often switch from traditional loosely bunched herding (LBH), in which animals within a herd are allowed to spread out natura...
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In many ant–plant mutualisms, ants establish colonies in hollow thorns, leaf pouches, or other specialized structures on their host plants, which they then defend from herbivores. Resource heterogeneity could affect the maintenance of these mutualisms if it leads to one or both partners altering their investment in the interaction. Such a phenomeno...
Article
The study of functional trait plasticity and optimal allocation strategies in a water competition context may help to explain the mechanisms relating plant competition to ecological semi-arid patterns. We measured four functional plant traits –root to shoot ratio, superficial to deep roots ratio, root diameter, and root estimated surface area to sh...
Article
Strong relationships exist between social connections and information transmission [1-9], where individuals' network position plays a key role in whether or not they acquire novel information [2, 3, 5, 6]. The relationships between social connections and information acquisition may be bidirectional if learning novel information, in addition to bein...
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Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint wer...
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en Effective population size, a central concept in conservation biology, is now routinely estimated from genetic surveys and can also be theoretically predicted from demographic, life‐history, and mating‐system data. By evaluating the consistency of theoretical predictions with empirically estimated effective size, insights can be gained regarding...
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Pastoral livelihoods are evolving rapidly. The emergence of globalized markets and the integration of globalized production in developing countries have forced many pastoralists, along with the rest of the world’s consumers, to shift their economic strategies of production to accommodate these evolving markets. The objective of this paper is to ill...
Article
Group members interact with each other during multiple social behaviours that range from aggressive to affiliative interactions. It is not known, however, whether an individual's suite of social behaviours consistently covaries through time and across different types of social interactions. Consistent social behaviour would be advantageous in group...
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Photographs, taken by field scientists, tourists, automated cameras, and incidental photographers, are the most abundant source of data on wildlife today. Wildbook is an autonomous computational system that starts from massive collections of images and, by detecting various species of animals and identifying individuals, combined with sophisticated...
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Though morphologically very similar, equids across the extant species occupy ecological niches that are surprisingly non-overlapping. Occupancy of these distinct niches appears related to subtle physiological and behavioural adaptations which, in turn, correspond to significant differences in the social behaviours and emergent social systems charac...