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Daniel J. Rogers

Daniel J. Rogers
Department for Environment and Water, South Australian Government

PhD

About

23
Publications
5,045
Reads
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382
Citations
Introduction
My career has focused on applied ecology with a strong focus on problem solving for management. I am passionate about finding ways to bridge the gap between science and policy, and improving the application of ecological evidence in decision making. I currently work as an ecologist in the South Australian Government, with a focus on identifying what scientific evidence is required to inform government decisions, and finding ways to acquire this evidence through research partnerships.
Additional affiliations
January 2008 - February 2015
University of Adelaide
Position
  • Honorary Research Fellow
March 2005 - March 2006
Lund University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
March 1998 - February 2002
University of Adelaide
Field of study
  • Applied behavioural ecology

Publications

Publications (23)
Technical Report
Full-text available
One of South Australia’s Ramsar wetlands of international importance, the Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth (CLLMM), has been in decline due to human-driven changes in its hydrology and the use of surrounding landscapes. In 2010, the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) began a revegetation program (CLLMM Vegetation Pr...
Article
Fire and seral vegetation succession are known to influence the distribution and abundance of a wide range of arid and semi-arid mammal species. In Triodia hummock grasslands, the gradual increase in Triodia cover after fire is a significant factor influencing mammal distribution and abundance. However, the height of fire-adapted hummock grass spec...
Article
Full-text available
Determining what level of investment is required, and where and how it is used, to maintain biodiversity across vast areas is difficult. In response to this challenge, the South Australian Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources has developed an information framework known as the 'Aridlands Landscape Assessment Framework' (ALAF) to p...
Article
Full-text available
The Coorong, South Australia, is a globally significant wetland system, listed in the Ramsar Convention under a number of different criteria, including its importance to waterbird populations. Based on annual waterbird censuses conducted between 2000 and 2007, spatiotemporal analyses revealed that significant differences in waterbird community stru...
Article
The loss of wetlands and semi-natural grasslands throughout much of Europe has led to a historic decline of species associated with these habitats. The reinstatement of these habitats, however, requires spatially explicit predictions of the most suitable sites for restoration, to maximize the ecological benefit per unit effort. One species that dem...
Article
The Coorong and Lower Lakes are listed as a Wetland of International Significance under the Ramsar Convention. This wetland system was nominated because of the diversity of wetlands that were supported: fresh, estuarine and hypermarine; and because of the importance of the area to vast numbers of water birds: ducks, swans, pelicans, terns, grebes,...
Article
Rufous Bristlebirds (Dasyornis broadbenti), possess song repertoires of between 12 and 30 different song-types, only a proportion of which are shared between different individuals. As a result, the comparison of songs among individuals is complicated by the use of multiple song-types. Using both discriminant function analysis (DFA) and spectrograph...
Article
A strong pattern has emerged between sedentary behaviour and song sharing between territorial neighbours for avian species that possess song repertoires. This paper investigates song-repertoire size, and rates of song sharing and type matching, in the Rufous Bristlebird (Dasyornis broadbenti), a southern Australian species for which there is strong...
Chapter
The Mount Lofty Ranges and adjacent plains support an isolated woodland and open forest system that has been extensively cleared such that only 7% of the pre-European vegetation remains. The vegetation has been disproportionately cleared from the good quality agricultural land on lower elevations where only 2% remains. Within this region floral res...
Article
Using a combination of field study, published records covering the period 1984–2003 and vegetation data, the extent of occurrence of Dasyornis broadbenti broadbenti was estimated at 620 km2 and the area of occupancy at 205–245 km2. By mapping the location of calling birds the mean home range of paired adults in the Coorong National Park was estimat...
Article
This work investigated whether the songs of the rufous bristlebird, Dasyornis broadbenti, vary between populations that have become isolated through habitat clearance, in a similar way to that found between island populations of other bird species, separated by ocean. In addition, the extent of song variation between the two extant subspecies of D....
Article
Pseudophryne bibroni is a small terrestrial frog inhabiting southeast Australia, the males of which call from burrows, both to attract females and maintain territories. This study investigates the capacity for using advertisement calls of P. bibroni to census and monitor frog individuals, through analysis of individually distinct call features. Dis...

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