Daniel Pollak

Daniel Pollak
University of Massachusetts Amherst | UMass Amherst · Department of Psychology

Bachelor of Science

About

5
Publications
909
Reads
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37
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
37 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
Introduction
Interests in computational neuroethology and visual ecology. I am an extracellular electrophysiologist, maker, and science communicator who has worked with songbirds, some arthropods, and hopefully more to come!

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Citizen Science or community science has been around for a long time. The scope of community involvement in Citizen Science initiatives ranges from short-term data collection to intensive engagement to delve into a research topic together with scientists and/or other volunteers. Although many volunteer researchers have academic training, it is not...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Mantis shrimp are aggressive, burrowing crustaceans that hunt using one the fastest movements in the natural world. These stomatopods can crack the calcified shells of prey or spear down unsuspecting fish with lighting speed. Their strike makes use of power-amplification mechanisms to move their limbs much faster than is possible by muscles alone....
Article
Full-text available
Mantis shrimp are aggressive, burrowing crustaceans that hunt using one the fastest movements in the natural world. These stomatopods can crack the calcified shells of prey or spear down unsuspecting fish with lighting speed. Their strike makes use of power-amplification mechanisms to move their limbs much faster than is possible by muscles alone....
Article
Breast cancer patients using aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as an adjuvant therapy often report side effects including hot flashes, mood changes, and cognitive impairment. Despite long-term use in humans, little is known about the effects of continuous AI administration on the brain and cognition. We used a primate model of human cognitive aging, the c...

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