Daniel Pastor-Galán

Daniel Pastor-Galán
University of Granada | UGR · Department of Geodynamics

PhD

About

107
Publications
30,384
Reads
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1,783
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - September 2018
Tohoku University
Position
  • Fellow
January 2013 - July 2016
Utrecht University
Position
  • Oroclinal bending and palaeolatitude reconstructions in the Eurasian-Arabian collision zone
Description
  • Postdoctoral position
January 2009 - December 2012
Universidad de Salamanca
Position
  • ODRE II
Description
  • http://odre.usal.es/
Education
September 2008 - June 2012
Universidad de Salamanca
Field of study
  • Geology
October 2002 - June 2007
Universidad de Salamanca
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (107)
Preprint
The Cambrian Explosion (541-515 Myr ago) is arguably the most significant evolutionary transition after the origin of life1-2. A variety of environmental perturbations have been correlated to this rapid animal species diversification1-3. Increased weathering fluxes from the continents to the oceans are hypothesized to cause these perturbations4-6,...
Data
Movie S2. Reconstruction movie showing deformation (strain rates) in the Variscan orogen during the late Carboniferous and Permian in the left and the finite strain in the right. Regions under deformation are shown in light to dark red colors (depending on the strain rate) if in extension whereas shortening is expressed in a scale of blue colors. T...
Data
Supplementary Fig. S1. Paleomagnetic declinations of different areas of the Variscan belt respect to Baltica (A). Paleolatitudes of the Variscan belt respect to Baltica (B). Reference location is county Cork, Ireland: 52° N, −9° E. The supercontinent cycle explains how landmasses amalgamate into supercontinents that dismember after a ~ 100 Myr ten...
Article
Full-text available
The supercontinent cycle explains how landmasses amalgamate into supercontinents that dismember after a ~ 100 Myr tenure in a quasi-periodic manner. Supercontinents are thought to be rigid superplates whose formation controls many of the Earth's secular variations, from long-term climate trends to global mantle circulation. Pangea, the latest conti...
Preprint
The Mongol–Okhotsk Belt, the youngest segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, formed by the evolution and closure of the Mongol–Okhotsk Ocean. The oceanic closure formed two volcanoplutonic belts: Selenge Belt in the north and Middle Gobi Belt in the south (in present day coordinates). However, the origin and tectonic evolution of the Mongol–Ok...
Article
The Mongol-Okhotsk Belt is the youngest segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which is the venue of the massive juvenile crust emplacement, and its formation and evolutions are still pending problems. This paper presents the first up-to-date U Pb zircon ages, Hf-in-zircon isotope, geochemical and whole-rock Nd isotope data from igneous rocks...
Article
Paleomagnetism is a versatile tool in the Earth sciences: it provides critical input to geological time scales and plate tectonic reconstructions. Despite its undeniable perks, paleomagnetism is not without complications. Remagnetizations overprinting the original magnetic signature of rocks are frequent, especially in orogens which tend to be the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Paleomagnetism is a versatile tool in the Earth sciences: it provides critical input to geological time scales and plate tectonic reconstructions. Despite its undeniable perks, paleomagnetism is not without complications. Remagnetizations overprinting the original magnetic signature of rocks are frequent, especially in orogens which tend to be the...
Article
Forearc basins preserve the geologic record relating strictly to arc magmatism. The provenance of forearc sediment can be used to differentiate periods of crustal growth, accretion, and destruction, enhanced magmatism, advancing and retreating subduction slabs, delamination, etc. These tectonic systems predict differing degrees of sedimentary rewor...
Article
Full-text available
The Mineoka Ophiolite Mélange is located at the intersection of the Pacific, Philippine Sea, Eurasian, and North American plates. The Mineoka ophiolite origin is disputed, and it has been ascribed to a fully subducted plate or part of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates. In this paper, we present a kinematic reconstruction of the Mineoka Ophiolit...
Preprint
The Mongol–Okhotsk Belt is the youngest segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which is the venue of the massive juvenile crust emplacement, and it is formation and evolutions are still pending problems. This paper presents the first up-to-date U-Pb zircon ages, Hf-in-zircon isotope, geochemical and whole-rock Nd isotope data from igneous rock...
Article
The Kitomyo Schist from Kurosegawa Belt, Shikoku, has been long considered as the oldest records of subduction metamorphism in Japan, based on an early 1970s K–Ar dating of white mica. The schist consists of mafic and pelitic layers and occurs as a tectonic block within serpentinite. Reappraisal of the schist confirmed the schist is characterized b...
Article
Full-text available
The Ubendian Belt between the Archaean Tanzania Craton and the Bangweulu Block, represents a Paleoproterozoic orogeny of these two constituents of the Congo craton at ~1.8 Ga, forming the Central African Shield, during the Columbia Supercontinent cycle and consolidated during the Gondwana assembly. Metagranitic rocks from the Southern and Northern...
Article
Full-text available
The amalgamation of Pangea formed the contorted Variscan-Alleghanian orogen, suturing Gondwana and Laurussia during the Carboniferous. From all swirls of this orogen, a double curve in Iberia stands out, the coupled Cantabrian Orocline and Central Iberian curve. The Cantabrian Orocline formed at ca. 315–290 Ma subsequent to the Variscan orogeny. Th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The collision between Gondwana and Laurussia that formed the latest supercontinent, Pangea, occurred during Devonian to Early Permian times and resulted in large-scale orogeny that today transects Europe, northwest Africa and eastern North America. This orogen is characterized by an S shape corrugated geometry in Iberia. The northern curv...
Article
Full-text available
The collision between Gondwana and Laurussia that formed the latest supercontinent, Pangea, occurred during Devonian to early Permian times and resulted in a large-scale orogeny that today transects Europe, northwest Africa, and eastern North America. This orogen is characterized by an "S" shaped corrugated geometry in Iberia. The northern curve of...
Article
The Cantabrian Zone, in the Variscan belt of Western Europe, has one of the most continuous Ediacaran-Palaeozoic stratigraphic successions in the world. This succession has been previously extensively studied, including several detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological studies on with detrital zircon geochronology with 30 available samples spanning the...
Article
The Talesh Mountains (NW Iran) witnessed a long deformation history from the Triassic Cimmerian orogeny to the ongoing Arabia-Eurasia collision. This protracted multi-stage deformation has generated a remarkably curved orogen with a puzzling kinematic and deformational history. In this study, we investigate the origin of the Talesh curvature throug...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific communities are placing an increasing emphasis on the implementation of data management protocols concerning data archiving and distribution. For instance, every proposal submitted to the European Horizon 2020 program, as well as to the National Science Foundation in the USA, requires a dedicated section that outlines project data manage...
Preprint
The amalgamation of Pangea formed the contorted Variscan-Alleghanian orogen, suturingGondwana and Laurussia during the Carboniferous. From all swirls of this orogen, a doublecurve stands out in Iberia, the coupled Cantabrian Orocline and Central Iberian Curve. TheCantabrian Orocline formed subsequent to Variscan orogeny (ca. 315-295 Ma). Themechani...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Paleozoic geology of Iberia is dominated by the tectonics of the Variscan orogeny and its aftermath. This defining geologic event was the result of large-scale collision that involved amalgamation of multiple continents and micro-continents, the closure of oceanic basins and eventual orogenic collapse, and finally modification and oroclinal ben...
Article
Supercontinents are usually interpreted to be single and rigid continental plates. How and when Pangea became a rigid supercontinent is disputed, and age estimations vary from ~330 to ~240 Ma. The Gondwana-Laurussia collision formed the Variscan-Alleghanian belt, the most prominent witness of Pangea's amalgamation. In Iberia, this orogen draws an “...
Article
Full-text available
There is an emerging consensus that Earth's landmasses amalgamate quasi-periodically into supercontinents, interpreted to be rigid super-plates essentially lacking tectonically active inner boundaries and showing little internal lithosphere–mantle interactions. The formation and disruption of supercontinents have been linked to changes in sea-level...
Preprint
Supercontinents are usually interpreted to be single and rigid continental plates. How and when Pangea became a rigid supercontinent is disputed, and age estimations vary from ~330 to ~240 Ma. The Gondwana-Laurussia collision formed the Variscan-Alleghanian belt, the most prominent witness of Pangea’s amalgamation. In Iberia, this orogen draws an “...
Article
The amalgamation of Pangea during the Carboniferous produced a winding mountain belt: the Variscan orogen of W Europe. In the Iberian Peninsula this tortuous geometry is dominated by two major structures: the Cantabrian Orocline, to the north and the Central Iberian curve to the south. Here, we perform a detailed structural analysis of an area with...
Article
Since the late Eocene, convergence and subsequent collision between Arabia and Eurasia was accommo-dated both in the overriding Eurasian plate forming the Greater Caucasus orogen and the Iranian plateau, and by subduction and accretion of the Neotethys and Arabian margin forming the East Anatolian plateau and the Zagros. To quantify how much Arabia...
Article
Full-text available
The winding Variscan belt in Iberia, featuring the Cantabrian orocline (NW Iberia) and the Central Iberian curve, is a foremost expression of the late Carboniferous amalgamation of Pangea, which produced remagnetizations spanning almost the entire globe. Also in Iberia, late Carboniferous remagnetizations are widespread often hindering paleomagneti...
Article
Full-text available
Most mountain belts on Earth show some degree of curvature in plan view, from a slight bend to horseshoe shapes. Such curvatures may occur on different scales, from individual thrust sheets to entire plate boundaries. Curvature may be acquired by vertical-axis rotation during or after orogenesis, or reflect primary lateral variations in shortening...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Greater Caucasus, extending from the Black Sea in the West to the Caspian Sea in the East, is the world's second largest active collisional orogen. It differs from traditional orogens in its relatively short length (~1100km) and its location >350 km away from a plate boundary (Arabia-Eurasia). Causes for its formation since the Late Eocene are...
Article
The Variscan mountain belt in Iberia defines a large “S” shape with the Cantabrian Orocline in the north and the Central Iberian curve, an alleged orocline belt of opposite curvature, to the south. The Cantabrian Orocline is kinematically well constrained, but the geometry and kinematics of the Central Iberian curve are still controversial. Here, w...
Article
The Cantabrian orocline is a large structure that bends the Variscan orogen of Western Europe in NW Iberia. The extensively studied kinematics of its core, the foreland of the orogen, indicates that the structure is secondary, i.e. acquired after the formation of the orogenic edifice. However, the extent of the Cantabrian orocline away from its cor...
Article
Regional Variscan structure in southern Ireland follows a gentle arcuate trend of ca. 25 • concave to the SE that apparently follows the geometry of the Cantabrian Orocline (NW Iberia) when Iberia is restored to its position prior to the opening of the Biscay Bay. We report paleomagnetic results from Devonian and Carboniferous rocks in southern Ire...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The Lesser Caucasus fold-and-thrust belt – part of the former Eurasian margin ‒ displays a peculiar northward arc-shaped geometry that was defined as an orocline in an earlier study. The Lesser Caucasus was affected by two main tectonic events that could have caused orocline formation: 1) late Cretaceous-Paleocene collision of the South Ar...
Article
Full-text available
The supercontinent Pangea formed in the late Carboniferous as a result of the Gondwana-Laurussia collision, producing the strongly sinuous Variscan–Alleghanian orogen. Iberia is interpreted to comprise two Variscan bends, forming an S-shaped orogenic belt: the Canta-brian orocline to the north and the Central Iberian bend to the south. Coeval forma...
Article
Full-text available
Seven samples of Siluro-Devonian sedimentary rocks from the Cantabrian and Central Iberian zones of the Iberian Variscan belt have been investigated for provenance and contain four main age populations in variable relative proportion: Ediacaran–Cryogenian (c. 0.55–0.8 Ga), Tonian–Stenian (0.85–1.2 Ga), Palaeoproterozoic (c. 1.8–2.2 Ga) and Archaean...
Article
Orogenic curvature is a ubiquitous feature of mountain belts, and the plate tectonic and geodynamic setting responsible for the development of curved orogens is a subject of debate. In order to distinguish between different models of orocline formation it is necessary to tightly constrain the absolute timing of oroclinal development. However, deter...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Western European Variscan belt shows two coupled oroclines arranged in an "S"-shaped pattern consisting of northern (Cantabrian) and southern (Central Iberian) arcs. Paleomagnetic and structural constraints provide evidence that the northern arc was developed during the Late Pennsylvanian after the closure of the Rheic Ocean and the formation a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia preserves a voluminous, almost continuous, sedimentary sequence that ranges in age from Ediacaran to Early Permian. Its tectonic setting is controversial and recent hypotheses include (i) passive margin deposition along the northern margin of Gondwana, (ii) an active continental margin, (iii) the margin of a driftin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Seven Silurian and Devonian samples from the Cantabrian and Central Iberian zones of the Variscan belt have been investigated for paleogeographic purposes using detrital zircon U-Pb ages. A total of 764 analyses were performed. All samples contain four main age populations in variable relative proportions: Ediacaran–Cryogenian (ca. 0.55–0.8 Ga), To...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Western European Variscan shows a lithospheric-scale “S”-shaped map pattern and has been interpreted as two coupled oroclines; a northern Cantabrian orocline and southern Central Iberian orocline. The northern Cantabrian orocline shows a striking 180°curvature that is concave towards the east. The orocline model for this relies on a wealth of p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding the causes of the opening and closure of oceanic tracts is a major ongoing endeavour in contemporary Earth Science. Ancient oceans are an important part of this process because they preserve a record of the different processes involved and so shed light on the causes of ocean opening and widening, and the subsequent dynamic flip towar...
Article
Full-text available
Ediacaran and Early Cambrian sedimentary rocks from NW Iberia have been investigated for detrital zircon U–Pb ages. A total of 1,161 concordant U–Pb ages were obtained in zircons separated from four Ediacaran samples (3 from the Cantabrian Zone and one from the Central Iberian zone) and two Lower Cambrian samples (one from the Cantabrian Zone and o...
Article
Full-text available
Oroclines are the largest scale folds on Earth, and the process of oroclinal formation is a key topic in tectonics. However, most studies of oroclines have focused on the hinge areas, where the changes in strike, and therefore the orocline shape, are most obvious. In this paper, we investigate the deformation mechanisms, the timing, and the structu...
Article
Full-text available
Detrital zircon laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry U-Pb age data from the Lower Ordovician Armorican Quartzite (deformed passive margin strata of Gondwanan affinity) of the Iberian Massif are presented herein. The S-shaped coupled Iberian oroclines defined within these zones palinspastically restore to a 2300 km linear Vari...
Article
The Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia preserves a voluminous, almost continuous, sedimentary sequence that ranges in age from Ediacaran to Early Permian. Its tectonic setting is controversial and recent hypotheses include (i) pas-sive margin deposition along the northern margin of Gondwana, (ii) an active continental margin, or (iii) the margin of a dri...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The north Gondwanan passive margin sequence of the Iberian Massif is one of the most complete and well-studied Ediacaran-Paleozoic sections in the world. Detrital zircon U-Pb age analysis of 20 samples spanning each geologic time period from the Ediacaran through Permian have provided a consistent set of group ages, mainly Ediacaran-Cryogenian (ca....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
n the tectonic community, accepted paleogeographic reconstructions are founded in the idea of continental lithospheric rigidity. Nevertheless, recent work has conclusively shown that continental lithosphere can accommodate large deformations, especially related with differential rotations around vertical axes. Present-day geodetic measurements and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia preserves a voluminous, almost continuous, sedimentary sequence that ranges from Neoproterozoic to Early Permian in age. Its tectonic setting is controversial and recent hypotheses include (i) passive margin deposition along the northern margin of Gondwana or (ii) an active continental margin or (iii) a drifting rib...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Cantabrian Arc, situated in the SW Variscan Belt of Europe, has been recently defined as a true orocline, constraining kinematics and deformation timing. The core of the Cantabrian Orocline is characterized by two different fold sets: (1) that runs parallel to the outcrops of the main thrusts and describes a horseshoe shape concave towards the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Paleozoic Variscan orogeny was a large-scale collisional event involving amalgamation of multiple continents and micro-continents. Existing data, suggests oroclinal buckling of an originally near-linear convergent margin during the last stages of Variscan deformation in the late Paleozoic. Closure of the Rheic Ocean resulted in E-W shortening (...
Poster
Full-text available
The Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia preserves a voluminous, almost continuous, sedimentary sequence that ranges from Neoproterozoic to Early Permian in age. Its tectonic setting is controversial and recent hypotheses include (i) passive margin deposition along the northern margin of Gondwana or (ii) an active continental margin or (iii) a drifting rib...
Article
The Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia preserves a voluminous, almost continuous, sedimentary sequence that ranges from Neoproterozoic to Early Permian in age. Its tectonic setting is controversial and recent hypotheses include (i) passive margin deposition along the northern margin of Gondwana or (ii) an active continental margin or (iii) a drifting rib...