Daniel S Park

Daniel S Park
Purdue University | Purdue · Department of Biological Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

87
Publications
53,547
Reads
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2,069
Citations
Citations since 2016
69 Research Items
2030 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
Additional affiliations
November 2020 - present
Purdue University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2018 - present
Harvard University
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2017 - August 2018
The University of Arizona
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2007 - November 2014
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • Plant Biology
March 2001 - August 2007
Seoul National University
Field of study
  • Human Resource Development / Biology

Publications

Publications (87)
Article
Full-text available
Species are characterized by their behavioral, physiological and ecological attributes, which determine their role in ecosystems. In turn, ecosystems and their functions are defined by the species that inhabit them. Thus, evaluating the functional diversity and distributions of species is of utmost importance to studies of biogeography, community e...
Article
Species occurrence records are essential to understanding Earth's biodiversity and addressing global environmental issues, but do not always reflect actual locations of occurrence. Certain geographical coordinates are assigned repeatedly to thousands of observation/collection records. This may result from imperfect data management and georeferencin...
Article
Full-text available
Massive biological databases of species occurrences, or georeferenced locations where a species has been observed, are essential inputs for modeling present and future species distributions. Location accuracy is often assessed by determining whether the observation geocoordinates fall within the boundaries of the declared political divisions. This...
Article
Plant phenology has been shifting dramatically in response to climate change, a shift that may have significant and widespread ecological consequences. Of particular concern are tropical biomes, which represent the most biodiverse and imperiled regions of the world. However, compared to temperate floras, we know little about phenological responses...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant phenology has been shifting dramatically in response to climate change, a shift that may have significant and widespread ecological consequences. Of particular concern are tropical biomes, which represent the most biodiverse and imperiled regions of the world. However, compared to temperate floras, we know little about phenological responses...
Article
Full-text available
The ecological and evolutionary processes that allow alien species to establish and dominate native communities (i.e., become invasive) have been a rich area of research. Past areas of inquiry have included identifying the traits necessary to invade a community and/or determining how phylogenetic relatedness of the introduced species with the resid...
Article
Plant-pollinator mutualisms rely upon the synchrony of interacting taxa. Climate change can disrupt this synchrony as phenological responses to climate vary within and across species. However, intra- and interspecific variation in phenological responses is seldom considered simultaneously, limiting our understanding of climate change impacts on int...
Article
Earth's most speciose biomes are in the tropics, yet tropical plant phenology remains poorly understood. Tropical phenological data are comparatively scarce and viewed through the lens of a 'temperate phenological paradigm' expecting phenological traits to respond to strong, predictably annual shifts in climate (e.g., between subfreezing and frost-...
Preprint
Full-text available
Massive biological databases of species occurrences, or georeferenced locations where a species has been observed, are essential inputs for modeling present and future species distributions. Location accuracy is often assessed by determining whether the observation geocoordinates fall within the boundaries of the declared political divisions. This...
Preprint
Full-text available
Massive biological databases of species occurrences, or georeferenced locations where a species has been observed, are essential inputs for modeling present and future species distributions. Location accuracy is often assessed by determining whether the observation geocoordinates fall within the boundaries of the declared political divisions. This...
Article
Full-text available
Addressing global environmental challenges requires access to biodiversity data across wide spatial, temporal and taxonomic scales. Availability of such data has increased exponentially recently with the proliferation of biodiversity databases. However, heterogeneous coverage, protocols, and standards have hampered integration among these databases...
Article
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There is a long‐standing idea that the timing of leaf production in seasonally cold climates is linked to xylem anatomy, specifically vessel diameter because of the hydraulic requirements of expanding leaves. We tested for a relationship between the timing of leaf out and vessel diameter in 220 plants in three common gardens accounting for species’...
Article
Full-text available
Competing phylogenetic models have been proposed to explain the success of species introduced to other communities. Here, we present a study predicting the establishment success of birds introduced to Florida, Hawaii and New Zealand using several alternative models, considering species' phylogenetic relatedness to source- and recipient-range taxa,...
Article
Full-text available
To meet the ambitious objectives of biodiversity and climate conventions, the international community requires clarity on how these objectives can be operationalized spatially and how multiple targets can be pursued concurrently. To support goal setting and the implementation of international strategies and action plans, spatial guidance is needed...
Preprint
Full-text available
Herbarium collections shape our understanding of the world's flora and are crucial for addressing global change and biodiversity conservation. The formation of such natural history collections, however, are not free from sociopolitical issues of immediate relevance. Despite increasing efforts addressing issues of representation and colonialism in n...
Article
Interactions between species can influence successful reproduction, resulting in reproductive character displacement, where the similarity of reproductive traits – such as flowering time – among close relatives growing together differ more so than when growing apart. Evidence for the overall prevalence and direction of this phenomenon, and its stab...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity contributes to the ecological and climatic stability of the Amazon Basin1,2, but is increasingly threatened by deforestation and fire3,4. Here we quantify these impacts over the past two decades using remote-sensing estimates of fire and deforestation and comprehensive range estimates of 11,514 plant species and 3,079 vertebrate specie...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim: Addressing global environmental challenges requires access to biodiversity data across wide spatial, temporal and biological scales. Recent decades have witnessed an exponential increase of biodiversity information aggregated by biodiversity databases (hereafter ‘databases’). However, heterogeneous coverage, protocols, and standards of databas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Competing phylogenetic models have been proposed to explain the success of species introduced to other communities. Here, we present a study predicting the establishment success of birds introduced to Florida, Hawaii, and New Zealand using several alternative models, considering species' phylogenetic relatedness to source and recipient range taxa,...
Article
Full-text available
The last two decades have seen growing use of phylogenetic patterns to test hypotheses predicting the success of introduced species. Nearly all of these tests have focused on hypotheses pertaining to phylogenetic relatedness between introduced species and those of the recipient community, largely neglecting hypotheses regarding phylogenetic relatio...
Article
Phenology, or the timing of life history events, can be heterogeneous across biological communities and landscapes and can vary across a wide variety of spatiotemporal scales. Here, we synthesize information from landscape phenology studies across different scales of measurement around a set of core concepts. We highlight why phenology is scale dep...
Preprint
Full-text available
Phenology, the study of the timing of cyclical life history events and seasonal changes, is a fundamental aspect of how individual species, communities, and ecosystems will respond to climate change. Both biotic and abiotic phenological patterns are changing rapidly in response to changing seasonal temperatures and other climate-related drivers, an...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) constitute the most common class of models across ecology, evolution and conservation. The advent of ready‐to‐use software packages and increasing availability of digital geoinformation have considerably assisted the application of SDMs in the past decade, greatly enabling their broader use for informing conservat...
Article
Generic delimitations within the cosmopolitan Carduus-Cirsium group (i.e., "thistles") have a long history of taxonomic confusion and debate. We present the most comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the group to date to test generic limits, reconstruct the evolution of pappus type, and elucidate the role of chromosomal evolution. We offer two solut...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species are a major threat to biodiversity and ecosystem function. Thus, understanding their spread and ecological impacts is critical for management and control. Strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum Sabine) is an aggressive invader across the tropics and has been rapidly spreading throughout the eastern rainforests of Madagascar. However...
Preprint
Full-text available
Interactions between species can influence access to resources and successful reproduction. One possible outcome of such interactions is reproductive character displacement. Here, the similarity of reproductive traits - such as flowering time - among close relatives growing in sympatry differ more so than when growing apart. However, evidence for t...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology—the timing of life-history events—is a key trait for understanding responses of organisms to climate. The digitization and online mobilization of herbarium specimens is rapidly advancing our understanding of plant phenological response to climate and climatic change. The current practice of manually harvesting data from individual specime...
Preprint
Full-text available
Phenology, the timing of life-history events, is a key trait for understanding responses of organisms to climate. The digitization and online mobilization of herbarium specimens is rapidly advancing our understanding of plant phenological response to climate and climatic change. The current practice of manually harvesting data from individual speci...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) constitute the most common class of models across ecology, evolution and conservation. The advent of ready-to-use software packages and increasing availability of digital geoinformation have considerably assisted the application of SDMs in the past decade, greatly enabling their broader use for informing conservat...
Article
Full-text available
Darwin proposed two seemingly contradictory hypotheses regarding factors influencing the outcome of biological invasions. He initially posited that nonnative species closely related to native species would be more likely to successfully establish, because they might share adaptations to the local environment (preadaptation hypothesis). However, bas...
Article
Within the ivory tower, the COVID-19 pandemic stands to disproportionately impact the invisible workforce of postdoctoral researchers. Faced with university closures, hiring freezes and a general lack of support and benefits, an entire generation of Ph.Ds. and their knowledge and skills may be lost to academia without intervention.
Article
Full-text available
Fruit‐eating animals play important roles as seed dispersal agents in terrestrial systems. Yet, the extent to which seed dispersal by nocturnal omnivores may facilitate germination and the recruitment of plant communities has rarely been investigated. Characterizing their roles in seed dispersal is necessary to provide a more complete picture of ho...
Preprint
Full-text available
paragraph To meet the ambitious objectives of biodiversity and climate conventions, countries and the international community require clarity on how these objectives can be operationalized spatially, and multiple targets be pursued concurrently ¹ . To support governments and political conventions, spatial guidance is needed to identify which areas...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Though substantial effort has gone into predicting how global climate change will impact biodiversity patterns, the scarcity of taxon‐specific information has hampered the efficacy of these endeavors. Further, most studies analyzing spatiotemporal patterns of biodiversity focus narrowly on species richness. We apply machine learning approaches to a...
Article
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Limiting climate change to less than 2°C is the focus of international policy under the climate convention (UNFCCC), and is essential to preventing extinctions, a focus of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The post-2020 biodiversity framework drafted by the CBD proposes conserving 30% of both land and oceans by 2030. However, the combin...
Article
Full-text available
Limiting climate change to less than 2°C is the focus of international policy under the climate convention (UNFCCC), and is essential to preventing extinctions, a focus of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The post‐2020 biodiversity framework drafted by the CBD proposes conserving 30% of both land and oceans by 2030. However, the combin...
Article
Full-text available
Natural history collections (NHCs) are the foundation of historical baselines for assessing anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity. Along these lines, the online mobilization of specimens via digitization—the conversion of specimen data into accessible digital content—has greatly expanded the use of NHC collections across a diversity of disciplines....
Article
Full-text available
Synthesizing trait observations and knowledge across the Tree of Life remains a grand challenge for biodiversity science. Species traits are widely used in ecological and evolutionary science, and new data and methods have proliferated rapidly. Yet accessing and integrating disparate data sources remains a considerable challenge, slowing progress t...
Article
Full-text available
A key feature of life’s diversity is that some species are common but many more are rare. Nonetheless, at global scales, we do not know what fraction of biodiversity consists of rare species. Here, we present the largest compilation of global plant diversity to quantify the fraction of Earth’s plant biodiversity that are rare. A large fraction, ~36...
Article
Full-text available
Reporting specific modelling methods and metadata is essential to the reproducibility of ecological studies, yet guidelines rarely exist regarding what information should be noted. Here, we address this issue for ecological niche modelling or species distribution modelling, a rapidly developing toolset in ecology used across many aspects of biodive...
Preprint
Full-text available
A key feature of life’s diversity is that some species are common but many more are rare. Nonetheless, at global scales, we do not know what fraction of biodiversity consists of rare species. Here, we present the largest compilation of global plant species observation data in order to quantify the fraction of Earth’s extant land plant biodiversity...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological niche models are widely used in ecology and biogeography. Maxent is one of the most frequently used niche modeling tools, and many studies have aimed to optimize its performance. However, scholars have conflicting views on the treatment of predictor collinearity in Maxent modeling. Despite this lack of consensus, quantitative examination...
Preprint
Full-text available
Natural history collections (NHCs) are the foundation of historical baselines for assessing anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity. Along these lines, the online mobilization of specimens via digitization–the conversion of specimen data into accessible digital content–has greatly expanded the use of NHC collections across a diversity of disciplines....
Preprint
Full-text available
Natural history collections (NHCs) are the foundation of historical baselines for assessing anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity. Along these lines, the online mobilization of specimens via digitization–the conversion of specimen data into accessible digital content–has greatly expanded the use of NHC collections across a diversity of disciplines....
Preprint
Full-text available
Synthesising trait observations and knowledge across the Tree of Life remains a grand challenge for biodiversity science. Despite the well-recognised importance of traits for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions, trait-based approaches still struggle with several basic data requirements to deliver openly accessible, reproducible, and tr...
Article
Aim A common approach for prioritizing conservation is to identify concentrations (hotspots) of biodiversity. Such hotspots have traditionally been designated on the basis of species‐level metrics (e.g., species richness, endemism and extinction vulnerability). These approaches do not consider phylogenetics explicitly, although phylogenetic relatio...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology is a key biological trait that can determine an organism's survival and provides one of the clearest indicators of the effects of recent climatic change. Long time-series observations of plant phenology collected at continental scales could clarify latitudinal and regional patterns of plant responses and illuminate drivers of that variati...
Preprint
Full-text available
One contribution of 16 to a theme issue 'Biological collections for understanding biodiversity in the Anthropocene'. These authors contributed equally to this work. Electronic supplementary material is available online at https://dx. Phenology is a key biological trait that can determine an organism's survival and provides one of the clearest indic...
Data
Data S1 List of metabolites and metabolic reactions in ginseng genome‐scale metabolic network.
Data
Figure S1 Integrated pipeline for genome annotation (IPGA). Figure S2 Number of coding exons (CDS) comparison between plant species. Figure S3 Alternative splicing (AS) events in P. ginseng. Figure S4 The Ks distribution of paralog gene pairs and orthologs of five dicot plants. Figure S5 An example of zigzag extension of scaffold sequence. Fig...
Data
Table S1 Whole genome sequencing (WGS) data generated in this study. Table S2 Statistics of P. ginseng draft genome sequence ver.1.0. Table S3 Mapping status of mate‐pair reads. Table S4 Validation summary of the P. ginseng genome assembly using 13 BAC clones. Table S5 Statistics of BUSCO assessment of genome assembly and gene set prediction in...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis) is native to northeastern Asia. In Korea, F. sachalinensis is confined to two volcanic islands, Ullung and Dok islands, where it occurs as dodecaploids (2n = 132). We investigated the molecular variation in 104 accessions from 94 populations of F. sachalinensis and its relatives throughout their nati...
Article
Determining the mechanisms that underlie species distributions and assemblages is necessary to effectively preserve biodiversity. This cannot be accomplished by examining a single taxonomic group, as communities comprise a plethora of interactions across species and trophic levels. Here, we examine the patterns and relationships among plant, mammal...
Article
Aim: Self‐pollinating plants (‘selfers’) have larger geographical ranges and inhabit higher latitudes than their outcrossing relatives. This finding has led to the hypothesis that selfers also have broader climatic niches (‘niches’) because the increased likelihood of successful colonization into new areas and the initial purging of deleterious m...
Article
Full-text available
Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, reputed as the king of medicinal herbs, has slow growth, long generation time, low seed production, and complicated genome structure that hamper its study. Here, we unveil the genomic architecture of tetraploid P. ginseng by de novo genome assembly, representing 2.98 Gbp with 59,352 annotated genes. Resequencing data indi...
Article
Full-text available
Ecologists are increasingly making use of molecular phylogenies, especially in the fields of community ecology and conservation. However, these phylogenies are often used without full appreciation of their underlying assumptions and uncertainties. A frequent practice in ecological studies is inferring a phylogeny with molecular data from taxa only...
Article
Full-text available
Nonrandom collecting practices may bias conclusions drawn from analyses of herbarium records. Recent efforts to fully digitize and mobilize regional floras online offer a timely opportunity to assess commonalities and differences in herbarium sampling biases. We determined spatial, temporal, trait, phylogenetic, and collector biases in c. 5 million...
Article
A key step in understanding the distribution of biodiversity is the grouping of regions based on their shared elements. Historically, regionalization schemes have been largely species centric. Recently, there has been interest in incorporating phylogenetic information into regionalization schemes. Phylogenetic regionalization can provide novel insi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Non-random collecting practices may bias conclusions drawn from analyses of herbarium records. Recent efforts to fully digitize and mobilize regional floras offer a timely opportunity to assess commonalities and differences in herbarium sampling biases. We determined spatial, temporal, trait, phylogenetic, and collector biases in ∼5 million herbari...
Preprint
Self-pollinating plants (“selfers”) have larger geographic ranges and inhabit higher latitudes than their outcrossing relatives. This finding has led to the hypothesis that selfers also have broader climatic niches. It is possible that the increased likelihood of successful colonization into new areas and the initial purging of deleterious mutation...
Article
Full-text available
When precise coordinate data for training species distribution models (SDMs) are lacking, climatic variables are often assigned to centroids of geopolitically defined regions, frequently counties. This is problematic because approximations using centroids may not be representative of the regional climate or the locality from where species actually...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology is a key aspect of plant success. Recent research has demonstrated that herbarium specimens can provide important information on plant phenology. Massive digitization efforts have the potential to greatly expand herbarium-based phenological research, but also pose a serious challenge regarding efficient data collection. Here, we introduce...
Article
Full-text available
Regions with a mediterranean climate are among the most species-rich regions in the world. They are also among the regions with the greatest number of non-native invasive species. However, not all introduced species become invasive. Previously, we found that non-native Asteraceae closely related to native species are more likely to establish and sp...
Article
The number of exotic plant species that have been introduced into the United States far exceeds that of other groups of organisms, and many of these have become invasive. As in many regions of the globe, invasive members of the thistle tribe, Cardueae, are highly problematic in the California Floristic Province, an established biodiversity hotspot....
Article
Full-text available
Significance Invasive species negatively impact both natural ecosystems and human society and are notoriously difficult to control once established. Thus, identifying potentially invasive taxa and preventing their dislocation is the most efficient management method. Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis, which predicts that the less closely related to...