Daniel E Moerman

Daniel E Moerman
University of Michigan-Dearborn | UM-Dearborn · Department of Behavioral Sciences

PhD

About

91
Publications
57,488
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5,232
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
1614 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300

Publications

Publications (91)
Article
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Species from over a hundred genera found in North America have reported traditional uses as contraceptives or uses that suggest possible abortifacient or postcoital contraceptive activities. If any of these are both effective and relatively safe, that information ought to be preserved, both for its potential utility and because it would mean that t...
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Background and aim: Despite recent publications, practitioners remain unfamiliar with the current terminology related to the placebo and nocebo phenomena observed in clinical trials and practice, nor with the factors that modulate them. To cover the gap, the European Headache Federation appointed a panel of experts to clarify the terms associated...
Article
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three candidate explanations for the "placebo response": the "conditioned stimulus-response," Irving Kirsch's "re-sponse-expectancy" explanation, and the "meaning response." The meaning response, Moerman argued, was the only one of the three candidate explanations that could cover all the data, gained from decades of RCTs and centuries of historica...
Article
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The argument by Lake et al. to create more human-like robots is, first, implausible and, second, undesirable. It seems implausible to me that a robot might have friends, fall in love, read Foucault, prefer Scotch to Bourbon, and so on. It seems undesirable because we already have 7 billion people on earth and don't really need more.
Article
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We provide a new perspect ve with which to understand what for a half century has been known as the »placebo effect.« We argue that, as currently used, the concept includes much that has nothing to do with placebos, confusirig the most interesting and important aspects of the phenomenon. We propose a new way to understand those aspects of medical c...
Chapter
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We assert that the highest and best uses of ethnopharmacology – which we understand to be the study of the human uses of medicinal plants – are a rich avenue for anthropological understanding of important aspects of human life. We also contend that the movement of ethnopharmacological research almost exclusively to a laboratory science devoted to t...
Article
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In this paper I argue against continued use of the terms 'placebo effect' and 'placebo response'. I cite a broad range of evidence to indicate that such events are not caused by 'placebos' but by their meanings, what they represent to patients, clinicians, families, and communities.
Article
Symbolic healing, that is, responding to meaningful experiences in positive ways, can facilitate human healing. This process partly engages consciousness and partly evades consciousness completely (sometimes it partakes of both simultaneously). This paper, presented as the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness Distinguished Lecture at the 2...
Article
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The distinctions drawn by Vaesen are plausible when we are comparing chimpanzees and human beings somewhere between the middle Paleolithic and the Neolithic. But since then new kinds of organization have vastly outstripped these neurological differences to account for the enormous advancement of human technology - from cuneiform to the iPhone - lea...
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Yarrow ( Achillea millefolium L.): A Neglected Panacea? A Review of Ethnobotany, Bioactivity, and Biomedical Research. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.) is one of the most widely used medicinal plants in the world, primarily for wounds, digestive problems, respiratory infections, and skin conditions, and secondarily, among other uses, for liver dise...
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It has been noted by philosophers of science that the successes of "method" in the physical sciences were contingent upon a division of "physical" and "mental," with the relegation of the latter "to the limbo of a sort of secondary or epiphenomenal existence" (Feigl 1953:12) and the existence of the physical accepted as a fundamental empirical fact...
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Statistical analyses of a very large sample of uses of medicinal plants by Native Americans demonstrate a method by which we can determine which sorts of plants they were most or least likely to select for use as medicines. Comparison of the patterns of use of Poaceae (grasses), Ro‐saceae (apples and others), and Caprifoliaceae (honeysuckles) sugge...
Article
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Ethnopharmacology as a well-defined field has a relatively short history, but for centuries researchers have been interested in the observation, description, and experimental investigation of indigenous drugs and their biological activities. Today, such articles are published in a variety of journals among which the Journal of Ethnopharmacology has...
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editorial
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A group of 44 people from ethnobotany and associated disciplines participated in an Ethnobotanical Summit at the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Kaua‘i on 27-30 January 2007. Considering the grave environmental crisis facing the world today, the loss of biodiversity and the loss of culture, the group decided to issue a statement to stress the...
Article
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This study provides a critical perspective on "informant agreement (consensus) analysis" as it is used in ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology. It recasts the concept at a higher cultural level, and it describes the cultural agreement about reported medicinal plant use for the native peoples of North America. It examines some plant use categories arou...
Article
Aim To investigate the distribution of local flowering plant species richness in areas surrounding American universities. Methods Species richness in university counties was compared with neighbouring counties. Data were derived from Synthesis of the North American Flora (http://www.phylosystems.com/prepublication). Probabilities of the resultant d...
Article
The author recalls how he came to do one of the first statistical analyses of native American medicinal plants, published in volume 1 of Journal of Ethnopharmacology. The background of that paper, "Symbols and Selectivity," involved a great deal of serendipity.
Article
A broad view of the “placebo effect” incorporating neurobiology, individual psychology, epistemology, history, and culture deeply enriches our understanding of these complex and powerful forces and, indeed, urges us to abandon that narrow and logically inconsistent concept for a much more interesting one. We review some of the data and background f...
Article
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We test the hypothesis that the choice by traditional people of species of plants for medicinal use does or does not depend on the families to which those species belong. Our geographic context is continental North America north of the Rio Grande River. Our plant context is flowering plants. Our ethnological context is Native American traditions. O...
Article
Comments on the article by F. Benedetti et al (see record 2003-07872-001) concerning how treatment outcomes are affected by "hidden" vs "open" medical treatments. The several studies reported in Benedetti et al's article urge us to think very carefully about our use of words and, in particular, encourage us to refrain from the use of the phrase "p...
Article
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Because the "placebo effect" seems to result from "deception," it is often disparaged and despised. Rethinking this and realizing that these benefits flow largely from the meaning of medical encounters (and are far better understood as "meaning responses"); realizing that there need be no deception to elicit them and that they are often very desira...
Conference Paper
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Ethnobiology is the scientific study of dynamic relationships among peoples, biota, and environments. Ethnobiology is multidisciplinary; the Ethnobiology Working Group (see insert) includes representatives from systematics, population biology, ecology, mathematical biology, cultural anthropology, ethnography, archaeology, geography, pharmacology, n...
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Posted July 15, 2002. This comment addresses an unusual feature of the data compared by I. Kirsch, T. J. Moore, A. Scoboria, & S. S. Nicholls (2002)-the fact that there seems to be no correlation between drug and control group outcomes. It also addresses the implicit practice recommendations in the article, arguing that even though these drugs may...
Article
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Posted July 15, 2002. This comment addresses an unusual feature of the data compared by I. Kirsch, T. J. Moore, A. Scoboria, & S. S. Nicholls (2002)-the fact that there seems to be no correlation between drug and control group outcomes. It also addresses the implicit practice recommendations in the article, arguing that even though these drugs may...
Article
Full-text available
We provide a new perspective with which to understand what for a half century has been known as the "placebo effect." We argue that, as currently used, the concept includes much that has nothing to do with placebos, confusing the most interesting and important aspects of the phenomenon. We propose a new way to understand those aspects of medical ca...
Book
Full-text available
Daniel E. Moerman presents an innovative and enlightening discussion of human reaction to the meaning of medical treatment. Many things happen in medicine that cannot be attributed to specific elements, such as drugs or surgical procedures. The same drug can workdifferently when presented in different colors; inert drugs (placebos, dummies) often h...
Article
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Objectives: The objectives of this paper were: a) to determine what can be learned from conclusions of systematic reviews about the evidence base of medicine; and b) to determine whether two readers draw similar conclusions from the same review, and whether these match the authors' conclusions.
Article
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Tropical primary forest is often considered to be the most important habitat for traditional peoples to gather medicinal plants. However, the role of weeds, commonly found in disturbed areas, in traditional medicinal floras has been overlooked. Data are presented showing the significant representation of weeds in the medicinal floras of the Highlan...
Article
The Department of Defense (DoD) is responsible for administering more than 25 million acres of federally owned land in the United States. As a land manager, the DoD must comply with the intent and directives of a number of cultural resources related statutes, regulations, and policy memoranda. Because of these statutes, regulations, and policy memo...
Article
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The objectives of this paper were: a) to determine what can be learned from conclusions of systematic reviews about the evidence base of medicine; and b) to determine whether two readers draw similar conclusions from the same review, and whether these match the authors' conclusions. Three methodologists (two per review) rated 160 Cochrane systemati...
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An analysis of the control groups in double-blind trials of medicines demonstrates broad variation--from 0 to 100 percent--in placebo effectiveness rates for the same treatment for the same condition. In two cases considered here, drug healing rates covary with placebo healing rates; placebo healing is the ultimate and inescapable "complementary me...
Article
The placebo effect is about healing. The human healing process can be substantially influenced in actual medical practice by appropriate kinds of caring, communication, and patient empowerment. The creation of "meaning" and of "representations" by physicians and their patients can have dramatic effects on patients for good or ill. These effects are...
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To assess whether frequency of placebo administration is associated with duodenal ulcer healing. A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials was undertaken. 79 of 80 trials that met the inclusion criteria. The pooled 4 week placebo healing rate of all duodenal ulcer trials that employed a four times a day regimen was compared with...
Article
This work is NOT from Taxon. It is a book published by Timber Press in 1989, 908 pages, listing 46,000 uses of plants by native American people.
Article
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The Land Condition Trend Analysis (LCTA) program is the Army's standard for land inventory and monitoring, employing standardized methods of natural resources data collection, analyses, and reporting designed to meet multiple goals and objectives. LCTA data has been used to characterize installation natural resources, evaluate the effects of Army m...
Article
Goody, Jack The Culture of Flowers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1993. xvii + 462 pp. including references and index. $54.95 cloth, $18.95 paper.
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Priestess, Mother, Sacred Sister: Religions Dominated by Women. SUSAN STARR SERED. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. 330 pp., photographs, notes, references, index.
Article
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Native American people developed a sophisticated plant-based medical system in the ten milennia before the European conquest of America. Many of the plants they used are familiar medicinal species, and have taken a role in modern medicinal treatments. Many others, even though not commonly in use at present, are interesting plants worthy of close st...
Article
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This paper compares the medicinal and food floras of the native peoples of North America. There is a surprising overlap of these floras by both family and taxon. Yet there are also substantial differences-food and medicine tend to involve different plant parts, plant habit, and plant character. The similarities and differences are considered in an...
Article
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Dans cet article, nous comparons deux protocoles de régression linéaire pour l'étude des usages des plantes médicinales par les populations indigènes d'Amérique. Dans le premier protocole, la variable est le nombre d'espèces médicinales utilisées dans chaque famille botanique et, dans l'autre protocole, la variable est le nombre d'usages des différ...
Article
Book reviewed in this article:Herbal Medicine Past and Present, Volume 1: Trying to Give Ease. John K. Crellin and Jane Philpott.Herbal Medicine Past and Present, Volume 2: A Reference Guide to Medicinal Plants. John K. Crellin and Jane Philpott.
Article
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This paper describes an analysis of the plants of North America which have been used medicinally by Native North Americans. A method using regression residuals is developed for analyzing large quantities of data, divided into subgroups of varying sorts and sizes. The analysis shows that the medicinal species utilized by Native North Americans are d...
Article
Ethnographic research at two work activity centers revealed the hidden connotations of "functioning" in production supervisors' discussions of high functioning and lower functioning clients. Teachers at the centers defined functioning in narrowly academic terms, whereas supervisors used the term to connote a whole set of mental, physical, and moral...
Article
Use of therapies to improve an individual's appearance is not a new medical concept. Androgenetic alopecia has been recognized as a disorder since the time of Hippocrates,1 and since that time, a variety of preparations and surgical procedures have been used as treatments. Recently, both the popular press and the professional literature2 have given...
Article
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Native Americans use a wide range of plants medicinally. Many of these plants have profound meaning to their users. Does this mean, as some assert, that tribal medicine is "all placebo"? Since the essential character of meaning is the arbitrariness of the sign, then insofar as this medicine is symbolic, the plants used medicinally will be a random...
Article
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The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
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In this paper I argue that the "placebo effect" doesn't exist; placebos do, but they are inert so they have no effects (that's what "inert" means). Yet we know that often enough, things do happen after placebo administration. Among various causes for such change, I attribute some effects to the meanings the placebos convey to the participants in th...

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