Daniel M. Haybron

Daniel M. Haybron
Saint Louis University | SLU · Department of Philosophy

About

55
Publications
57,354
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,213
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
726 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (55)
Chapter
Full-text available
Philosophy and Human Flourishing explores two pressing questions: What is a thriving, fulfilling, flourishing human life? What practices, associations, and institutions produce flourishing lives? These questions—in essence, “What are flourishing lives and how can we lead them?”—are long central to philosophy. Now, however, they can be addressed in...
Article
Interdisciplinary work in what we might call ‘prudential psychology’––which studies the psychology of what is good and bad for agents—has not received quite the attention that interdisciplinary work in moral psychology has had. This is understandable, but regrettable. To remedy the situation, we offer this chapter as a proposal for the future of in...
Article
Moral psychology is the study of how human minds make and are made by human morality. This state of the art volume covers contemporary philosophical and psychological work on moral psychology, as well as notable historical theories and figures in the field of moral psychology, such as Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, and the Buddha. The volume’s 50 chap...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper argues that a specifically environmental ethic is neither needed nor perhaps desirable for effecting the change in values for which many environmentalists have rightly called. Rather, familiar values such as beauty, and especially an outlook that regards those values as central aspects of a good life, may be all that is needed. The requi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper introduces a category of functional conditions to address certain difficulties that have arisen in philosophical work on the nature of happiness. In earlier work, I defended an emotional state theory of happiness on which being happy consists substantially in dispositional states, such as one's propensity for a relaxed or cheerful mood....
Article
Full-text available
A large empirical literature in psychology has established a two-dimensional model of measuring affect (positive and negative emotion) as well as circumplex-based models. The present series of studies begins with items developed from a philosophical theory of affect, which were iteratively reduced to a 6-factor, 18-item measure of emotional well-be...
Article
Full-text available
This paper argues that a specifically environmental ethic is neither needed nor perhaps desirable for effecting the change in values for which many environmentalists have rightly called. Rather, familiar values such as beauty and excellence, and especially an outlook that regards those values as central aspects of a good life, may be all that is ne...
Article
What makes a measure of well-being valid? The dominant approach today, construct validation, uses psychometrics to ensure that questionnaires behave in accordance with background knowledge. Our first claim is interpretive—construct validation obeys a coherentist logic that seeks to balance diverse sources of evidence about the construct in question...
Article
Full-text available
This introduction to the special issue on well-being and health explores the ways that philosophical inquiry into well-being can play a productive role in understanding health and medicine. We offer an explanation of the concept of well-being, central theories of well-being, and how these key topics, along with other cutting-edge issues such as dis...
Article
It is hard not to like a book that so outrageously and skilfully defies expectations. Richard Kraut is among the leading authorities on Aristotle’s ethics, and his recent volume, What Is Good and Why: The Ethics of Well-Being (Kraut (2007)) gave us one of the best contemporary articulations of the Aristotelian approach to well-being. The title of t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite a voluminous literature on happiness and well-being, there is still no scholarly consensus on whether happiness and well-being are purely psychological phenomena, or for that matter whether they are identical. Commentators frequently defend their views by reference to intuitions about the nature of happiness or well-being, raising the quest...
Chapter
This chapter examines the role of authenticity in well-being, focusing on issues raised by biotechnologies like gene editing. It is argued that there are good reasons to view authenticity as an aspect of well-being, and the chapter discusses some implications of this view for gene-editing technologies. Also briefly surveyed is the philosophical lit...
Article
Full-text available
Perfectionist views of well-being maintain that well-being ultimately consists, at least partly, in excellence or virtue. This paper argues that such views are untenable, focusing on Aristotelian perfectionism. The argument appeals, first, to intuitive counterexamples to perfectionism. A second worry is that it seems impossible to interpret perfect...
Article
Full-text available
What makes a measure of well-being valid? The dominant approach today, construct validation, uses psychometric tests to ensure that questionnaires behave in accordance with background knowledge. Our first claim is interpretive – construct validation obeys a coherentist logic that seeks to balance diverse sources of evidence about the construct in q...
Conference Paper
What makes a measure of well-being valid? The dominant approach today, construct validation, uses psychometrics to ensure that questionnaires behave in accordance with background knowledge. Our first claim is interpretive-construct validation obeys a coherentist logic that seeks to balance diverse sources of evidence about the construct in question...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the philosophical ideals animating eudaimonic psychology, arguing that eudaimonic measures of well-being reflect a reasonably coherent and defensible family of philosophical views centering on the notion of nature-fulfillment. Aristotelian theories are the best-known examples, but “eudaimonistic” views of well-being can take...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the norms that should guide policies aimed at promoting happiness or, more broadly, well-being. In particular, we take up the question of which conception of well-being should govern well-being policy (WBP), assuming some such policies to be legitimate. In answer, we lay out a case for ‘pragmatic subjectivism’: given widely acce...
Article
Full-text available
Few would deny that happiness arises from a complex interaction of internal and external factors, like optimism on the one hand and money on the other. Yet research, as well as practical strategies for promoting happiness, tends to focus narrowly on one side or the other. A typical study, for instance, might examine the correlation between happines...
Chapter
Full-text available
The power of situations to influence individual behavior and psychology has gotten a great deal of attention in the moral psychology literature. Far less noticed has been the implications of situationist research for the study of well-being. Yet this work may if anything be more significant for understanding human well-being than moral behavior. Th...
Article
Full-text available
What are the norms governing the pursuit of happiness? Presumably not just anything goes. But are the rules any more interesting than platitudes like "do what works, as long as you don't hurt anyone"? Such questions have become especially salient in light of the development of positive psychology. Yet so far these matters have received relatively l...
Chapter
How can we define happiness? We could say, to be happy is to have a favourable emotional condition. Is this a good definition? ‘What is happiness?’ suggests that this provides a useful starting point to a study of what happiness is, although there are alternatives available. Happiness can be divided into three elements: a state of attunement (feeli...
Book
Happiness: A Very Short Introduction considers the true nature of happiness and the current thinking on the subject, from psychology to philosophy. What is happiness? Is it subjective or can we put an objective value on it? How can and should we pursue happiness? Happiness is an everyday term in our lives, and most of us strive to be happy, but def...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the normative principles that should guide policies aimed at promoting happiness or, more broadly, well-being. After arguing that well-being policy is both legitimate and necessary, we lay out a case for "pragmatic subjectivism": given widely accepted principles of respect for persons, well-being policy may not assume any view o...
Article
Full-text available
The science of well-being studies an evaluative kind, well-being, which raises natural worries about the ability of empirical research to deliver. This paper argues that well-being research can provide important information about how people are doing without entangling itself very deeply in controversial normative claims. Most life satisfaction res...
Article
Full-text available
In an earlier paper I defended an emotional state theory of happiness. In a basic form, emotional state theories identify happiness with a person’s moods and emotions. To this formulation I added a second component, “mood propensity”: roughly, an individual’s disposition to experience moods, which can vary with the circumstances. Scott Hill argues...
Article
Full-text available
Economists are notoriously averse to paternalism. Yet the reigning methods of policy analysis in normative economics frequently counsel profoundly paternalistic policies. Or so we shall argue. We take our cue from the current debate over the use of happiness and other psychological measures of well-being in economics. The debate concerns those who...
Article
Full-text available
The psychological condition of happiness is normally considered a paradigm subjective good, and is closely associated with subjectivist accounts of well-being. This article argues that the value of happiness is best accounted for by a non-subjectivist approach to welfare: a eudaimonistic account that grounds well-being in the fulfillment of our nat...
Article
Full-text available
This paper aims to show that widespread, serious errors in the self-assessment of affect are a genuine possibility—one worth taking very seriously. For we are subject to a variety of errors concerning the character of our present and past affective states, or “affective ignorance.” For example, some affects, particularly moods, can greatly affect t...
Article
Full-text available
Modern reflection about the good life and the good society has been dominated by a spirit of liberal optimism, according to which people typically know what's good for them and make prudent choices in pursuit of their interests. As a result, people tend to do best, and pretty well at that, when given the greatest possible freedom to live as they wi...
Article
Full-text available
Life satisfaction is widely considered to be a central aspect of human welfare. Many have identified happiness with it, and some maintain that well-being consists largely or wholly in being satisfied with one’s life. Empirical research on well-being relies heavily on life satisfaction studies. The paper contends that life satisfaction attitudes are...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
The psychological condition of being happy is best understood as a matter of a person's emotional condition. I elucidate the notion of an emotional condition by introducing two distinctions concerning affect, and argue that this “emotional state” view is probably superior on intuitive and substantive grounds to theories that identify happiness with...
Article
Full-text available
I defend a methodology for theorizing about happiness. I reject three methods: conceptual analysis; scientific naturalism; and the “pure normative adequacy” approach, where the best conception of happiness is the one that best fills a role in moral theory. The concept of happiness is a folk notion employed by laypersons who have various practical i...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
This paper argues against hedonistic theories of happiness. First, hedonism is too inclusive: many pleasures cannot plausibly be construed as constitutive of happiness. Second, any credible theory must count either attitudes of life satisfaction, affective states such as mood, or both as constituents of happiness; yet neither sort of state reduces...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I defend the propriety of explaining the behavior of distributed connectionist networks by appeal to selected data stored therein. In particular, I argue that if there is a problem with such explanations, it is a consequence of the fact that information storage in networks is superpositional, and not because it is distributed. I then...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper two philosophical issues are discussed that hold special interest for empirical researchers studying happiness. The first issue concerns the question of how the psychological notion(s) of happiness invoked in empirical research relates to those traditionally employed by philosophers. The second concerns the question of how we ought to...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I examine the psychological traits that can play a constitutive role in hav-ing an evil character, using a recent affect-based account by Colin McGinn as my starting point. I distinguish several such traits and defend the importance of both affect and action-based ap-proaches. I then argue that someone who possesses these characterist...

Network

Cited By