Daniel Edmiston

Daniel Edmiston
University of Leeds · School of Sociology and Social Policy

PhD

About

44
Publications
5,837
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
355
Citations
Introduction
Daniel Edmiston is a Lecturer in Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Full-text available
Since 2008, mature welfare states have, to varying degrees, pursued a strategy of welfare reform that has reconfigured the dominant praxis of social citizenship. Drawing on qualitative data from two studies, this paper explores what bearing this has had on the political subjectivity of welfare claimants in the New Zealand context. The findings sugg...
Book
Based on a study exploring lived experiences of poverty and prosperity, this book problematizes dominant policy thinking surrounding the functions and limits of welfare in austerity Britain. It does so by critically examining the distributional effects of welfare reform and fiscal recalibration to establish what bearing this has on the changing cha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Official statistics tend to rely on a headcount approach to poverty measurement, distinguishing ‘the poor’ from the ‘non-poor’ on the basis of an anchored threshold. Invariably, this does little to engage with the gradations of material hardship affecting those living, to varying degrees, below the poverty line. In response, this paper interrogates...
Article
Full-text available
Local state and third sector actors routinely provide support to help people navigate their right to social security and mediate their chequered relationship to it. COVID‐19 has not only underlined the significance of these actors in the claims‐making process, but also just how vulnerable those working within ‘local ecosystems of support’ are to ex...
Article
In recent years, resilience has been invoked as both a pre-emptive and responsive strategy to tackling socio-material insecurity. This article outlines a number of discursive and administrative features that distinguish the rise of resilience from longer-term shifts towards ‘active citizenship’ in British social policy. Within this context, we draw...
Article
Full-text available
Official statistics tend to rely on a headcount approach to poverty measurement, distinguishing ‘the poor’ from the ‘non-poor’ on the basis of an anchored threshold. Invariably, this does little to engage with the gradations of material hardship affecting those living, to varying degrees, below the poverty line. In response, this paper interrogates...
Article
How have changes to the benefits system affected low-income families over the last decade and what does this mean for their exposure to the economic fallout of COVID-19? What has happened to depth of poverty, particularly for the poorest BAME children? And what reform agenda does this set for social security beyond the pandemic?
Article
Organisations engaged in benefits, employment and crisis support play an important role in the lives of claimants and those financially struggling in the UK today. In this report, we answer two questions: what is the nature and extent of support received by benefit claimants? And how have benefits, employment and crisis support been affected by COV...
Article
There has been much scrutiny of the British benefits system during COVID-19, and most experts agree that the benefits system has performed well, even if historic weaknesses remain. Yet little attention has been paid to those who start a claim that is ultimately not successful. This report focuses on these ‘unsuccessful claimants’, using new YouGov...
Chapter
Citizenship as a status concerns who gets what from the terms of membership within a given community. Citizenship as a socio-cultural practice shines light on how and why some are recognized as (worthy) members whilst others are not. Reflecting on this distinction, this chapter starts by briefly outlining T. H. Marshall’s seminal account that has p...
Article
This report presents the first findings from the Welfare at a (Social) Distance project to look at how far benefit claimants are connected to the world of work, helping to better understand the emerging picture from recent UK labour market statistics. In this report, we investigate a range of questions including, how many new claimants have a job?...
Chapter
This chapter provides a detailed overview of the development of social innovation policy in the European Union. It makes an important analytical distinction between policy for social innovation and policy as social innovation. In the context of these two policy agendas, not only has social innovation been understood as a means to achieve an end in...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter addresses key issues that public policy seeking to support social innovation faces. Combining theoretical insights of the Extended Social Grid Model with empirical results obtained from EU policy surveys and case studies, it identifies key policy implications and recommendations. It first introduces key notions for social innovation po...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter revisits the Extended Social Grid Model based on empirical work exploring the model. It summarizes the main findings around four basic points: first, the need to move beyond economic space as markets if social innovation for the marginalized is to be analysed in its full complexity and the variety of provision appreciated beyond a redu...
Chapter
This chapter explores in detail the evolution of social impact bonds (SIBs) in the United Kingdom as an example of social policy as social innovation. Specifically, it presents new analysis of three empirical cases in the United Kingdom. The chapter examines some key claims made by policy actors concerning SIBs as social innovation and welfare refo...
Chapter
In recent years, social innovation has become an increasingly prominent concept employed by political leaders and administrations across the world. In 2003, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) supported a range of initiatives and research to promote inclusive entrepreneurship and ‘improve social cohesion through the id...
Article
Quantitative research has tended to explain attitudinal divergence towards welfare and redistribution through self-interested rationalities. However, such an approach risks abstracting individuals from the structural determinants of resource allocation and biographical experience. With that in mind, this paper draws on a qualitative study of fifty...
Article
Full-text available
Social impact bonds are payment by results contracts that leverage private social investment to cover the up-front expenditure associated with welfare services. The introduction of private principles and actors through outcome-based commissioning has received a great deal of attention in social policy research. However, there has been much less att...
Article
Full-text available
Social impact bonds are payment by results contracts that leverage private social investment to cover the up-front expenditure associated with welfare services. The introduction of private principles and actors through outcome-based commissioning has received a great deal of attention in social policy research. However, there has been much less att...
Article
Since the global financial crisis in 2008, an ‘austerity consensus’ has emerged across many advanced capitalist economies (Farnsworth and Irving, 2012). Despite differing institutional settings, there has been a notable degree of convergence on fiscal consolidation (Farnsworth and Irving, 2012; Taylor-Gooby, 2012). Alongside this, political adminis...
Article
Full-text available
This paper demonstrates that the capabilities approach offers a number of conceptual and evaluative benefits for understanding social innovation and – in particular, its capacity to tackle marginalisation. Focusing on the substantive freedoms and achieved functionings of individuals introduces a multidimensional, plural appreciation of disadvantage...
Article
A growing body of research quantifies the recent impact of fiscal consolidation and public service reform in liberal welfare regimes. However, less is known about how this is affecting the common terms upon which citizenship status is granted and experienced. With this in mind, this article examines what bearing the political crafting of welfare au...
Article
Social innovation is often conceived as a unifying policy concept around which cross-sectoral stakeholders can coalesce and organise. The emphasis placed on ‘new’ and ‘novel’ approaches to social problems is presented as a departure from established modes of thinking and action that transcend existing political and socio-economic divisions. Rather...
Article
Full-text available
Viewed within their historical context, recent cuts to public social spending and increasingly governmental welfare reforms reflect and beget a shift in the praxis of social citizenship in the UK. This review article demonstrates how greater conceptual attention to the constitutive features of social citizenship can help clarify some of the claims...
Chapter
This chapter draws on lessons learnt from a mixed methods research project exploring the lived experiences of those negotiating affluence and deprivation in their day-to-day life. Edmiston considers the potential of a new methodological approach that seeks to overcome some of the challenges of researching poverty and vulnerability in divergent cont...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates how privatisation trends have affected the right to social security in the UK since 1979. Privatisation has regularly been posited as a solution to more efficiently and effectively target public services. However, the procedural effects of social security privatisation have been the opposite, with increased social spending a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the policy of austerity in three European welfare regimes with differing levels of social spending and fiscal balance: Italy; Sweden; and the UK. In spite of significant material differences between the three countries, the paper begins by illustrating that there is ultimately convergence in their responses to the economic crisi...
Article
Full-text available
The balance between private and public sectors in welfare activity in the UK has been documented by Burchardt (1997) and Smithies (2005) for three time periods; 1979/1980, 1995/1996 and 1999/2000. The existing evidence suggested that a welfare mix has previously been in existence but that the balance had been shifting. This paper explores this phen...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Considerable shifts in the depth and socio-demographic composition of UK poverty are not currently captured by dominant methods of poverty measurement across central government. Funded by a British Academy/Wolfson Fellowship, this project explores the changing significance of deep poverty in the UK and the varying ways in which it is distinct from the more general challenges of life on a low income. Drawing on a mixed methods longitudinal design, this project will generate a new evidence base on the extent, causes and consequences of deep poverty.
Project
Based on a study exploring lived experiences of poverty and prosperity, this book problematizes dominant policy thinking surrounding the functions and limits of welfare in austerity Britain. It does so by critically examining the distributional effects of welfare reform and fiscal recalibration to establish what bearing this has on the changing character and logic of social citizenship in Britain today. Drawing on testimonies of those experiencing relative deprivation and affluence, the book provides an account of the everyday language, ideals and practices that underpin social citizenship and structural inequality. Patterned divergence in the lived realities, political subjectivity and civic engagement of the ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ offers insight into the manifold ways in which welfare austerity secures and maintains institutional legitimacy amidst rising structural inequality. The book presents evidence to suggest that affluent citizens are able to engage with the prevailing terms of social citizenship from within, and in ways that meet their material and discursive ends. By contrast, those at the sharp end of welfare austerity lack the socio-material resources and means of collective identification to engage in sustained political struggle for their rights, identity and recognition. The book reflects on the implications of this for social policy design and delivery as well as the broader health of public deliberation surrounding welfare and inequality in advanced capitalist economies.
Project
CrESSI explores the economic underpinnings of social innovation with a particular focus on how policy and practice can enhance the lives of marginalized and disempowered citizens. Between 2014 and 2018, our team of researchers from Oxford, Budapest, Delft, Greifswald, Heidelberg, Pavia and Vienna will work on the question of creating economic space for social innovation. For our conceptual framework we take inspiration from three sources: We approach social innovation as a question of an interrelated grid of actors, institutions and cognitive frames drawing on Jens Beckert's social grid model of social change. We analyze the complex ends and means of social innovation drawing on the capabilities approach. This approach, pioneered by Martha Nussbaum and Amartya Sen, takes people's capabilities - their real opportunities to do and be what they have reason to value - to be of primary importance for ethical evaluation. We further analyze the ends and means of social innovation as embedded in redistributions of distributive and collective power in historical context, as pioneered by Michael Mann's work on the social sources of power. Further information: http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/faculty-research/research-projects/creating-economic-space-social-innovation-cressi