Daniel Ewon Choe

Daniel Ewon Choe
University of California, Davis | UCD · Department of Human Ecology

Ph.D.

About

40
Publications
7,746
Reads
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720
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
633 Citations
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Introduction
I am a developmental psychologist (Ph.D., University of Michigan) and assistant professor of human development and family studies at the University of California, Davis. My research examines the development of children's self-regulation, executive functions, and externalizing symptoms in relation to parental and community influences (e.g., maternal depression, SES) using observational, behavioral, neuropsychological, and questionnaire measures. Twitter: @danieewonchoe
Additional affiliations
May 2012 - May 2014
University of Pittsburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2007 - April 2012
University of Michigan
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2007 - April 2012
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Developmental Psychology

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
This prospective longitudinal study provides evidence of preschool-age precursors of hostile attribution bias in young school-age children, a topic that has received little empirical attention. We examined multiple risk domains, including laboratory and observational assessments of children's social-cognition, general cognitive functioning, effortf...
Article
Full-text available
Emotional distress experienced by mothers increases young children's risk of externalizing problems through suboptimal parenting and child self-regulation. An integrative structural equation model tested hypotheses that mothers' parenting (i.e., low levels of inductive discipline and maternal warmth) would mediate adverse effects of early maternal...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal depression is an established risk factor for child conduct problems, but relatively few studies have tested whether children’s behavioral problems exacerbate mothers’ depression or whether other child behavioral characteristics (e.g., self-regulation) may mediate bidirectional effects between maternal depression and child disruptive behavi...
Article
Young children’s use of mobile devices (eg, smartphones, tablets) is prevalent and increasing.¹ Although television exposure can harm young children’s self-regulation,² little research has investigated associations between children’s use of mobile devices and this consequential capacity. We examined associations between multimethod assessments of s...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of studies of preschool-aged children’s self-regulation presume that their higher levels of self-regulation are concurrently and prospectively associated with fewer externalizing and internalizing problems. This assumes their relations are only linear in form and negative, but studies with community samples of mostly non-Hispanic White...
Article
Higher television exposure has been repeatedly linked to poorer self-regulation among young children. Recent studies show use of mobile screen media devices is also negatively related to self-regulation in early childhood. Despite the proliferation of mobile devices in households with young children, it is unclear whether children’s use of smartpho...
Article
Full-text available
Recent dimensional models of adversity informed by a neurobiological deficit framework highlights threat and deprivation as core dimensions, whereas models informed by an evolutionary, adaptational and functional framework calls attention to harshness and unpredictability. This report seeks to evaluate an integrative model of threat, deprivation, a...
Article
Though the use of mobile devices (e.g., tablets, smartphones) by young children is pervasive and increasing, research relating children's use of mobile devices to their development is only beginning to emerge. Learning, language development, and self-regulation skills among children aged zero to five are of particular interest to pediatric clinicia...
Article
Background: Recent advancements in pediatric mental health (MH) increased accessibility of evidence-based interventions. Yet, accessibility alone does not explain the rise in MH services use (MHSU). Maltreatment-related adversity, symptom severity, and access to early interventions have been linked to ongoing need for services, yet their joint cont...
Article
Many psychological constructs show heterotypic continuity—their behavioral manifestations change with development but their meaning remains the same (e.g., externalizing problems). However, research has paid little attention to how to account for heterotypic continuity. Conceptual and methodological challenges of heterotypic continuity may prevent...
Article
Many psychological constructs show heterotypic continuity-their behavioral manifestations change with development but their meaning remains the same. However, research has paid little attention to how to account for heterotypic continuity. A promising approach to account for heterotypic continuity is creating a developmental scale using vertical sc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Infants are uniquely vulnerable to maternal depression’s noxious effects, but few longitudinal studies have tried to identify discrete postnatal trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms (MDS) beginning in infancy. This study extends evidence of heterogeneous change in postnatal MDS by examining their cross-contextual antecedents in infancy and...
Article
Infants are uniquely vulnerable to maternal depression's noxious effects, but few longitudinal studies have tried to identify discrete postnatal trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms (MDS) beginning in infancy. This study extends evidence of heterogeneous change in postnatal MDS by examining their cross-contextual antecedents in infancy and...
Poster
Full-text available
Use of mobile screen media devices (e.g., tablets, smartphones) by young children is pervasive and increasing, but not replacing television time. Self-regulation, the ability to plan, monitor, and control behavior, emotions, and cognition, improves rapidly in the toddler and preschool years, predicts consequential developmental outcomes, and is lin...
Poster
Full-text available
Thanks to the wonders of modern technology, instant gratification is often a click away. In this sense, delayed gratification seems to be a cruel and unnecessary exercise, a relic of the past that need not be revived. The role of technology use, often operationalized as screen time, in self-control among adolescents and young adults is the subject...
Article
Preventing problem behavior requires an understanding of earlier factors that are amenable to intervention. The main goals of our prospective longitudinal study were to trace trajectories of child externalizing behavior between ages 3 and 10 years, and to identify patterns of developmentally significant child and parenting risk factors that differe...
Article
Using a cohort of 310 low-income male adolescents living in an urban community and followed prospectively from 18 months through adolescence (ages 15–18 years), the current study examined whether individual, family, and community risk factors from ages 18 to 42 months were associated with adolescents' violent behavior, as indexed by juvenile petiti...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies demonstrate that boys' monoamine oxidase A ( MAOA ) genotype interacts with adverse rearing environments in early childhood, including punitive discipline, to predict later antisocial behavior. Yet the mechanisms by which MAOA and punitive parenting interact during childhood to amplify risk for antisocial behavior are not well unde...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies suggest that neighborhood deprivation is a unique risk factor in child and adolescent development of problem behavior. We sought to examine whether previously established intervention effects of the Family Check-Up (FCU) on child conduct problems at age 7.5 would persist through age 9.5, and whether neighborhood deprivation would mo...
Article
Few researchers have explored future educational aspirations as a promotive factor against exposure to community violence in relation to adolescents' violent behavior over time. The present study examined the direct and indirect effect of exposure to community violence prior to 9th grade on attitudes about violence and violent behavior in 12th grad...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Maladaptive social information processing, such as hostile attributional bias and aggressive response generation, is associated with childhood maladjustment. Although social information processing problems are correlated with heightened physiological responses to social threat, few studies have examined their associations with neural th...
Article
Full-text available
Although previous studies have shown that interactions between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype and childhood maltreatment predict Caucasian boys’ antisocial behavior, the generalizability of this gene-environment interaction to more diverse populations and more common parenting behaviors, such as punitive discipline in early childhood, is not c...
Article
Full-text available
Family conflict is a salient risk factor for African American adolescents' mental health problems. No study we are aware of has estimated trajectories of their family conflict and whether groups differ in internalizing and externalizing problems during the transition to young adulthood, a critical antecedent in adult mental health and psychopatholo...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined bidirectional associations between mothers' depressive symptoms and children's externalizing behavior and whether they were moderated by preschool-age effortful control and gender. Mothers and teachers reported on 224 primarily White, middle-class children at ages 3, 5, and 10. Effortful control was assessed via behavioral batte...
Article
Full-text available
This is the first longitudinal study of urban African American adolescents that has examined bidirectional effects between their family conflict and violent behavior across all of high school. Structured interviews were administered to 681 students each year in high school at ages 15, 16, 17, and 18 years. We used structural equation modeling to te...
Article
Full-text available
This longitudinal study of 251 families examined bidirectional associations between maternal depressive symptoms and toddler behavioral problems. Functional regulatory problems in infancy and gender were examined as moderators. Mothers rated children's regulatory problems of crying, feeding, and sleeping in infancy, toddler-age externalizing behavi...
Article
Full-text available
Children who are physically disciplined are at elevated risk for externalizing problems. Conversely, maternal reasoning and reminding of rules, or inductive discipline, is associated with fewer child externalizing problems. Few studies have simultaneously examined bidirectional associations between these forms of discipline and child adjustment usi...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to violence is common in South Africa. Yet, few studies examine how violence exposure contributes to South African adolescents' participation in youth violence. The aims of this study were to examine effects of different violence exposures on violent attitudes and behavior, to test whether attitudes mediated effects of violence exposures o...
Article
Full-text available
Family psychosocial stressors are key risk factors for children???s externalizing symptoms, yet we understand relatively little of their transactional interplay or their interaction with children???s individual characteristics. Recent evidence has indicated that children???s externalizing problems exacerbate family risk factors, and that children w...
Thesis
Family psychosocial stressors are key risk factors for children's externalizing symptoms, yet we understand relatively little of their transactional interplay or their interaction with children's individual characteristics. Recent evidence has indicated that children's externalizing problems exacerbate family risk factors, and that children with po...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Extensive research indicates family conflict increases risk of violent behavior during adolescence (Andreas & Watson, 2009). Furthermore, family conflict and violence exacerbate adolescents' mental health and make the transition to adulthood more difficult (Aisenberg & Herrenkohl, 2008). Thus, family conflict contributes to violent behavior during...
Article
Examined a cognitive-behavioral pathway by which depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers increase risk for later child externalizing problem behavior via parents' appraisals of child behavior and physical discipline. Participants were 245 children (118 girls) at risk for school-age conduct problems, and their parents and teachers. Children were...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Originally intended as a pilot study to calibrate laboratory-based behavioral measures of effortful control to preschoolers in Davis, CA, the PACT Study is now a small-scale longitudinal study of self-regulation and socioemotional adjustment, spanning early childhood with three waves of data collection. On each occasion, parents complete standardized questionnaires about their child's temperament, adjustment, their own caregiving practices, depressive symptoms, parenting stress, household chaos, and socioeconomic background. At wave 1 (age 2.5 to 3.5 years) and wave 2 (age 3.5 to 5), children are administered behavioral tasks of effortful control and neuropsychological tests of working memory, receptive language, and spatial ability. At wave 2, parents and children are asked to wear mobile monitors for psychophysiological data collection (e.g., respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period measured with electrocardiography and impedance cardiography, respectively) during rest, individual assessments of self-regulation and executive functions, and parent–child interactions. Preschool teachers are also asked to rate children's adjustment problems. At wave 3 (age 6), parents are emailed online questionnaires, and with parent approval, kindergarten teachers are mailed paper questionnaires assessing child adjustment, self-regulation, and social competence.