Daniel W. Carstensen

Daniel W. Carstensen
University of Copenhagen · Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate

PhD

About

31
Publications
22,080
Reads
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1,743
Citations
Introduction
I am currently studying mutualistic species interactions across space and time.
Additional affiliations
March 2012 - present
São Paulo State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2012 - November 2015
Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP) Rio Claro
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2007 - May 2011
Aarhus University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
February 2007 - March 2011
Aarhus University
Field of study
  • Community ecology and biogeography

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
The campo rupestre is a Neotropical OCBIL (old, climatically buffered infertile landscape), a grassy-shrub vegetation with high species richness and endemism, characterized by rocky outcrops surrounded by grasslands distributed in South American ancient mountaintops. We tested one OCBIL prediction: the prevalence of long-distance pollinators ensuri...
Article
The campo rupestre is a Neotropical OCBIL (old, climatically buffered infertile landscape), a grassy-shrub vegetation with high species richness and endemism, characterized by rocky outcrops surrounded by grasslands distributed in South American ancient mountaintops. We tested one OCBIL prediction: the prevalence of long-distance pollinators ensuri...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Tradução do artigo original "Ecology and evolution of plant diversity in the endangered campo 26 rupestre: a neglected conservation priority. Plant and Soil 403: 192-152" que pode ser acessado aqui (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-015-2637-8). Em caso de citação, deve-se mencionar o artigo original. A permissão para a tradução foi...
Article
Full-text available
Que as mudanças climáticas influenciam a biodiversidade e os serviços ecossistêmicos não há qualquer sombra de dúvida. Mas quais são exatamente essas influências? Existem espécies mais vulneráveis? Há espécies capazes de se adaptar? Podemos aprender com elas? Quais ecossistemas e serviços ambientais são mais afetados? Podemos evitar ou minimizar os...
Article
Full-text available
Non-crop habitats play a key role in maintaining functional diversity and ecosystem services in farmland. However, the interplay between beneficial insects and landscape variables has rarely been investigated in Neotropical agroecosystems. We used flower flies as a model group to investigate the effects of landscape attributes on beneficial insects...
Article
Full-text available
The archipelagos that form the transition between Asia and Australia were immortalized by Alfred Russel Wallace's observations on the connections between geography and animal distributions, which he summarized in what became the first major modern biogeographic synthesis. Wallace traveled the island region for eight years, during which he noted the...
Article
Specialization of species is often studied in ecology but its quantification and meaning is disputed. More recently, ecological network analysis has been widely used as a tool to quantify specialization, but here its true meaning is also debated. However, irrespective of the tool used, the geographic scale at which specialization is measured remain...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Among the world’s three major nectar-feeding bird taxa, hummingbirds are the most phenotypically specialized for nectarivory, followed by sunbirds, while the honeyeaters are the least phenotypically specialized taxa. We tested whether this phenotypic specialization gradient is also found in the interaction patterns with their floral resources....
Data
The compressed file contains the shapefile of the campo rupestre map used in the paper Silveira et al 2016. Plant and Soil.
Article
Full-text available
Background Botanists, ecologists and evolutionary biologists are familiar with the astonishing species richness and endemism of the fynbos of the Cape Floristic Region and the ancient and unique flora of the kwongkan of south-western Australia. These regions represent old, climatically-buffered infertile landscapes (OCBILs) that are the basis of a...
Article
Full-text available
Mutualistic interaction networks have been shown to be structurally conserved over space and time while pairwise interactions show high variability. In such networks, modularity is the division of species into compartments, or modules, where species within modules share more interactions with each other than they do with species from other modules....
Article
Full-text available
Mutualistic interaction networks have been shown to be structurally conserved over space and time while pairwise interactions show high variability. In such networks, modularity is the division of species into compartments, or modules, where species within modules share more interactions with each other than they do with species from other modules....
Chapter
Phenology is the study of recurrent biological events in the life cycle of organisms. For plants, reproductive events such as flowering and fruiting are critical stages in their life cycles, which also greatly affect other organisms depending on these resources. Here, we present the first community level plant phenology study across an altitudinal...
Chapter
Full-text available
Mutualisms such as animal pollination and seed dispersal, and protection of plants and insects by ants are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. Currently, mutualistic interactions among plants and animals are recognized for their paramount importance in biodiversity maintenance, especially in tropical ecosystems. In this chapter, we review the lit...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology has achieved a prominent position in current scenarios of global change research given its role in monitoring and predicting the timing of recurrent life cycle events. However, the implications of phenology to environmental conservation and management remain poorly explored. Here, we present the first explicit appraisal of how phenology —...
Article
Full-text available
Although species and their interactions in unison represent biodiversity and all the ecological and evolutionary processes associated with life, biotic interactions have, contrary to species, rarely been integrated into the concepts of spatial β-diversity. Here, we examine β-diversity of ecological networks by using pollination networks sampled acr...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions between species form complex networks that vary across space and time. Even without spatial or temporal constraints mutualistic pairwise interactions may vary, or rewire, across space but this variability is not well understood. Here, we quantify the beta diversity of species and interactions and test factors influencing the probabilit...
Article
Full-text available
Island biogeography has greatly contributed to our understanding of the processes determining species' distributions. Previous research has focused on the effects of island geography (i.e., island area, elevation, and isolation) and current climate as drivers of island species richness and endemism. Here, we evaluate the potential additional effect...
Article
Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship between species traits and large-scale species distributi...
Article
Full-text available
The species pool concept has played a central role in the development of ecological theory for at least 60 yr. Surprisingly, there is little consensus as to how one should define the species pool, and consequently, no systematic approach exists. Because the definition of the species pool is essential to infer the processes that shape ecological com...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity is organised into complex ecological networks of interacting species in local ecosystems, but our knowledge about the effects of habitat fragmentation on such systems remains limited. We consider the effects of this key driver of both local and global change on both mutualistic and antagonistic systems at different levels of biological...
Article
Full-text available
Aim  In order to advance our understanding of the assembly of communities on islands and to elucidate the function of different islands in creating regional and subregional distribution patterns, we identify island biogeographical roles on the basis of the distribution of the islands’ biota within the archipelago. We explore which island characteri...
Article
Full-text available
Características florales de las plantas visitadas por el zunzuncito (Mellisuga helenae). INTRODUCTION Hummingbirds and their food-plants rely to a large extent on each other for food supply and pollination service, respectively. This mutual relationship has co-evolved for mil-lions of years and across the Americas involv-ing over 330 hummingbird sp...
Article
On the island of Lombok, Indonesia, three nectarivorous birds partially coexist: the two closely related and very similar Lichmera honeyeaters and a sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis). We investigated how these species segregated ecologically in areas where they coexisted by evaluating foraging visits and aggressive interactions at rich and poor nectar r...
Article
On the island of Lombok, Indonesia, three nectarivorous birds partially coexist: the two closely related and very similar Lichmera honeyeaters and a sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis). We investigated how these species segregated ecologically in areas where they coexisted by evaluating foraging visits and aggressive interactions at rich and poor nectar r...
Article
Many birds visit flowers for nectar and pollen, and, in addition, may serve as pollinators. In fact, after insects, birds are the most important pollinators of flowering plants in the world (Proctor et al., 1996). Most flower-visiting birds belong to a few families, which predominantly consume nectar and, to a minor extent, pollen. However, birds f...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
he e-phenology is a multidisciplinary project that explores innovative solutions for plant monitoring in the tropics, combining research in Computer Science, Phenology, and Ecology. On-the-ground phenological observations preclude large areas of study and are laborious and time consuming. Near-surface remote phenology with digital cameras is still area-limited but reduces considerably manpower. Furthermore, it has proven to be an important tool for monitoring several species and accurately accessing leaf changes. In this project, we aim to apply new technologies to enhance the capabilities of near-surface remote phenological observation to detect changes on various scales, from leaves to ecosystems. Our goal is to address theoretical and practical problems involving the combination of two remote phenology monitoring systems: digital and hyperspectral cameras at three scales: on-the-ground, phenology tower, and near-space using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). It is geared towards four innovative objectives: (a) to develop a protocol for extracting spectral data from the RGB color channels, improving the information that can be derived from low-cost digital monitoring systems; (b) to apply those technologies to extract plant ecophysiological data advancing our knowledge of plant seasonal responses to environmental drivers in the tropics to climate change; (c) to develop near-surface monitoring system for reproductive phenophases i.e., flowering and fruiting, based on digital and hyperspectral images truth-grounded by species-specific spectral data; and (d) to advance and to apply novel database, image processing, machine learning, and visualization models, methods, and algorithms to support acquisition, management, integration, and analysis of phenology data systems from various scales. The research team is composed of Computer Scientists and researchers in Plant Ecology and Phenology.